U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

Technology Innovation News Survey

Entries for May 16-31, 2014

Market/Commercialization Information
LUCKEY FUSRAP REMEDIATION
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, USACE District, Buffalo, NY.
Federal Business Opportunities, FBO-4551, Solicitation W912P4-14-R-0002, 2014

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is providing a presolicitation notice for the Luckey FUSRAP remediation at Luckey, Ohio, which will involve decontamination and demolition of beryllium-impacted structures and remediation of beryllium-contaminated soil, fill, and debris. Release of the solicitation is anticipated in July 2014 as a small business set-aside. The resulting contract will be a $100 million, 10-year, single-award task-order contract. Draft background files on the Luckey remediation are attached to the notice at FBO.gov. https://www.fbo.gov/?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=101af937145eebd47fe9a88a6c465d20&tab=core&_cview=0


SMALL BUSINESS EVENT: EPA VENDOR OUTREACH SESSION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SMALL BUSINESSES
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Small Business Programs, Washington, DC.
Federal Business Opportunities, FBO-4563, Solicitation Environmental_Outreach_2014, 2014

The U.S. EPA's Office of Small Business Programs will present a vendor outreach session for environmental small businesses on July 17, 2014, from 10 am to 12 pm at EPA WJC East, 1201 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20004, in Room 1153. The Federal Triangle Metro stop is nearest. "Doing Business with EPA: Upcoming Procurements & Small Business Set-Asides" will be presented by Lamont Norwood, POST Team Leader, and David Allen, Program Analyst, Office of Acquisition Management. Visit the OSBP website at http://www.epa.gov/smallbusiness/ and the Forecast Database at http://yosemite1.epa.gov/oarm/oam/forecastdatabase.nsf. Bring business cards, a capabilities statement, and a state-issued ID. Space is limited, and only 2 individuals per firm will be admitted. Those interested but unable to attend in person can register to participate via webinar at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/vendoroutreachwebinar. https://www.fbo.gov/notices/ff7f42a9bbb4c318e712f4ea1b970613


WASHINGTON COUNTY LEAD DISTRICT: POTOSI, OLD MINES, AND RICHWOODS SITES, OU-1
U.S. EPA, Office of Acquisition Management, Region VII, Lenexa, KS.
Federal Business Opportunities, FBO-4507, Solicitation SOL-R7-14-00008, 2014

This requirement will be a 100% HUBzone set-aside under NAICS 562910 for the performance of environmental remediation services at lead-contaminated properties at three NPL sites: Potosi, Old Mines, and Richwoods. All three are part of a family of Superfund sites in Washington County, Missouri. This remedial action will address the cleanup of ~450,000 tons of Pb-contaminated residential soil (=400 ppm Pb). EPA anticipates issuing an indefinite quantity contract with fixed unit prices consisting of a one-year base period and two one-year option periods. Estimated dollar value for this procurement is between $30M and $35M. Posting of the solicitation/RFP is anticipated during the 3rd quarter of FY 2014. https://www.fbo.gov/spg/EPA/OAM/RegVII/SOL-R7-14-00008/listing.html


ENVIRONMENTAL CONTRACT FOR FY14 DEFENSE ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM (DERP): RURAL ALASKA
Department of the Army, National Guard Bureau, USPFO for Alaska, Camp Denali, Fort Richardson, AK.
Federal Business Opportunities, FBO-4590, Solicitation W91ZRU-14-B-0001, 2014

A combined synopsis/solicitation has been issued for an environmental contract for the FY14 Defense Environmental Restoration Program. The contractor will perform all environmental remediation services required to remediate eight petroleum-contaminated sites located throughout rural Alaska. This project is being solicited as 100% small business set-aside, NAICS code 562910. The project magnitude is $5M to $10M for a period of performance five years from the date of award. Responses are due by July 22, 2014. https://www.fbo.gov/spg/USA/NGB/DAHA51/W91ZRU-14-B-0001/listing.html


MULTIPLE AWARD TASK ORDER CONTRACT (MATOC) FOR MULTIPLE ENVIRONMENTAL GOVERNMENT ACQUISITION (MEGA): HUNTSVILLE, CONTAINING CHEMICAL WARFARE MATERIAL (CWM)
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, USACE HNC, Huntsville, AL.
Federal Business Opportunities, FBO-4591, Solicitation W912DY14R0068, 2014

This procurement is being offered as an unrestricted acquisition, NAICS code 562910. The proposed IDIQ MATOC consists of one 3-year base period and one 2-year option period. The government anticipates award to around 10 eligible offerors (5 large businesses and 5 small businesses). Task orders issued under this MATOC will be firm-fixed-price, cost-plus-fixed-fee (CPFF) term form, CPFF completion form, or any combination of thereof, and may include options. Task orders under this contract will be issued for various sites known or suspected to be affected by hazardous, toxic, and radioactive waste and/or munitions and explosives of concern to support existing and future USACE customers throughout the United States, including Alaska and Hawaii, the U.S. territories, and outlying areas as defined by FAR 2.101. The solicitation likely will be issued early in July 2014 in electronic format only. https://www.fbo.gov/spg/USA/COE/DACA87/W912DY14R0068/listing.html


MULTIPLE AWARD TASK ORDER CONTRACT (MATOC) FOR MULTIPLE ENVIRONMENTAL GOVERNMENT ACQUISITION (MEGA): OMAHA
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, USACE HNC, Omaha District, Omaha, NE.
Federal Business Opportunities, FBO-4591, Solicitation W912DY14R0100, 2014

This procurement will be offered as an unrestricted acquisition. The proposed IDIQ MATOC for environmental remediation support services consists of one 3-year base period and one 2-year option period. Task orders will be issued for various sites known or suspected to be affected by hazardous, toxic, and radioactive waste, and/or munitions and explosives of concern. The Government anticipates award to a target of 10 eligible offerors (5 large businesses and 5 small businesses), NAICS code 562910. The pool of contractors will share the total contract capacity of $400M. Task orders issued under this MATOC will be firm-fixed-price, cost-plus fixed fee (CPFF) term form, CPFF completion form, or any combination of thereof, and may include options. The solicitation likely will be issued in early July 2014 in electronic format only. https://www.fbo.gov/spg/USA/COE/DACA87/W912DY14R0100/listing.html


BAXTER SPRINGS SUBSITE, OPERABLE UNIT #03
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region VII, Lenexa, KS.
Federal Business Opportunities, FBO-4593, Solicitation SOL-R7-14-00007, 2014

A remedial action will be performed for a portion of the mine waste located at the Baxter Springs Kansas subsite, Operable Unit #03, of the Cherokee County Superfund site. The selected remedy consists of excavation, consolidation, and disposal of ~309,000 cubic yards of mine waste and associated soils contaminated with heavy metals, mainly lead, cadmium, and zinc. The site is part of the Tri-State Mining District of southeast Kansas, southwest Missouri, and northeast Oklahoma. EPA anticipates issuing a fixed-price contract for a period of 36 months (1-year base period with 2-one year options). Estimated dollar value for this procurement is between $2.5M to $3.5M. This procurement will be set aside for service-disabled, veteran-owned small business, NAICS code 562910 (500). The solicitation likely will be issued in mid-July 2014 at http://www.epa.gov/oam/regions/index.htm and will also be available through the search interface at https://www.fedconnect.net/. https://www.fbo.gov/spg/EPA/OAM/RegVII/SOL-R7-14-00007/listing.html


SUPERFUND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE RESEARCH AND TRAINING PROGRAM (P42)
National Institutes of Health, Funding Opportunity RFA-ES-14-007, 2014

The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) is announcing the continuation of the Superfund Hazardous Substance Research and Training Program, referred to as Superfund Research Program Centers. NIEHS has posted a list of suggested research topics at http://www.niehs.nih.gov/research/supported/assets/docs/r_s/suggested_research_and_activities.pdf. Four awards are anticipated from total estimated program funding of $8,500,000. The closing date for applications is September 3, 2014. http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-ES-14-007.html


REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFPS) FOR U.S. PERSONAL SERVICES CONTRACTOR (PSC): ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION SPECIALIST, USAID/VIETNAM
U.S. Agency for International Development, Overseas Missions, Hanoi, Viet Nam.
Federal Business Opportunities, FBO-4600, Solicitation SOL-440-14-000011, 2014

The airports at Da Nang, Bien Hoa, and Phu Cat have been referred to as dioxin hotspots due to high dioxin concentrations remaining decades after large volumes of Agent Orange and other defoliants were handled at these sites. USAID is seeking proposals from U.S. citizens interested in providing services as the USAID/Vietnam technical expert on environmental remediation. Details are provided in the file attached to the notice at FBO.gov. The award of a contract is subject to the availability of funds. The closing date is July 25, 2014, 4:00 pm, Hanoi, Vietnam, local time. https://www.fbo.gov/notices/1bce66557f056a542e65cfd83eec5308



Cleanup News
JENNINGS PASSIVE TREATMENT SYSTEM REHABILITATION
Dunn, M.H., T.P. Danehy, C.A. Neely, R.M. Mahony, S.L. Busler, B.J. Page, and C.F. Denholm.
Exploring New Frontiers in Reclamation: 2014 National Meeting of the American Society of Mining and Reclamation, Oklahoma City, OK, June 14-20, 2014. Book of Abstracts, p 33, 2014

In 1997, the Jennings vertical flow pond (VFP) passive treatment system was installed at the Jennings Environmental Education Center in Butler County, Pennsylvania. The hydraulic design life of the media was estimated at 7-10 years, with exhaustion of the acid mine drainage (AMD) neutralizing capacity at ~14 years. Occasional maintenance activities, such as stirring the treatment media, is believed to have extended media life, but after almost 15 years of near-continuous operation, the treatment media of the VFP at Jennings experienced a significant loss of permeability. In 2012, media from the VFP was removed and encapsulated in Harsco's Mineral CSA, an alkaline material byproduct produced during recovery of metals from steel slag. Next, a new underdrain, bedding stone, and treatment media (spent mushroom compost, high-calcium limestone, and single-shredded woodchips) were installed. Post-rehabilitation water quality monitoring indicates that the system is functioning well. Additional information: http://www.paenvironmentdigest.com/newsletter/default.asp?NewsletterArticleID=26804

USING ENVIRONMENTAL FRACTURING TO ACHIEVE SUSTAINABLE REMEDIATION IN DIFFICULT LITHOLOGIES
Bures, G.H.
SMART 2013: Smart Methods in Advanced Remediation Technologies, Calgary, Canada. 32 slides, 2013

This presentation provides an overview of how environmental fracturing technologies can overcome the limitations of in situ remediation in low-permeability lithologies. Two case studies showcase the integrated and synergistic use of fracture enhancement techniques for attaining sustainable and cost-effective remediation: (1) gasoline in shallow clays and (2) TCE in deep bedrock. Physical, biological, and chemical (reductive and oxidative) treatment technologies are addressed in the context of both subsurface extraction and delivery techniques to optimize contact with contaminants for their conversion to innocuous and natural end products.
Slides: http://www.smartremediation.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/Using-Environmental-Fracturing-To-Achieve-Sustainable-Remediation-In-Difficult-Lithologies_-G-Bures.pdf

CLEANUP ACTION PLAN: BEE JAY SCALES, SUNNYSIDE, WASHINGTON
Hepner, N.
Washington State Department of Ecology, 36 pp, 2013

The selected cleanup action for the Bee-Jay Scales site comprises shallow source-zone soil excavation, in situ bioremediation injection wells/borings (for delivery of a sodium acetate solution or calcium acetate to address nitrate and pesticide contamination in groundwater (e.g., 1,2-dichloropropane) and soil (e.g., 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene)), institutional controls, natural attenuation, and vertical permeable reactive barrier(s) or other Ecology-approved treatment method for the off-property groundwater plume attributable to the site. A biologically operated PRB consisting of sand mixed with phosphate and some type of organic material (mulch, compost, wood chips) would be appropriate for this site. A bench-scale study and field pilot (introduction of sodium acetate into four injection wells on the property) were conducted as part of the Phase II remedial investigation to guide potential nitrate and herbicide remediation activities. The treatability study determined the most effective treatment was denitrification using acetate as an electron donor. The pilot study demonstrated that injection of acetate was successful in remediating nitrate and nitrite concentrations to below detectable limits in groundwater within a 10-ft radius of the affected well for the duration of the monitoring period and also reducing concentrations of those constituents in saturated soils. https://fortress.wa.gov/ecy/gsp/DocViewer.ashx?did=10578
Find more information in the site document repository: https://fortress.wa.gov/ecy/gsp/CleanupSiteDocuments.aspx?csid=3641.

SMALLEY-PIPER NPL SITE
Annual Legislative Report for July 1, 2012 - June 30, 2013. Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Division of Remediation, p 7, 2013

The Smalley-Piper site, ~9 acres in size, is located in Collierville, Shelby County, Tennessee. Among various industrial activities conducted at the site from the 1950s to 1980s, the manufacture of magnesium battery casings utilizing caustic soda, acetic acid, chromium acid, and water led to the contamination of soil, surface water pathways, and groundwater in the Memphis aquifer in the site vicinity. All on-site operations at the facility ceased in 2007. The amended Superfund State Contract (SSC) addresses the previously performed soil remedy of excavation and ex situ stabilization/solidification and adds a soil flushing component. The amended SSC has a total current estimated cost of $7,781,970, with the State's 10% match being $778,197. The original SSC addressing soil remedial action was performed at a cost of $1,982,915. The intent of the in situ flushing remedy is to reduce remaining Cr(VI) subsurface soil concentrations that might continue to leach into groundwater. Water will be extracted by on-site recovery wells; treated by chemical reduction, precipitation, and ion exchange treatment modules; and then re-injected into the former source area via an infiltration gallery. The system is expected to operate for one year, with July 31, 2015, the goal for remedy completion. http://www.tn.gov/environment//docs/dor/annual_leg_report_fy_2012_2013.pdf

OPTIMIZATION REVIEW: GROVELAND WELLS NUMBERS 1 AND 2 SUPERFUND SITE, TOWN OF GROVELAND, ESSEX COUNTY, MASSACHUSETTS
EPA 542-R-13-001, 78 pp, 2013

An in situ thermal treatment remedy in the source area removed the majority of contaminant mass and reduced TCE concentrations in soil and groundwater near the source area accordingly; however, TCE concentrations in confirmation soil samples are nearly two orders of magnitude higher than the site-specific soil cleanup standard for TCE, which suggests that contamination remains in vadose zone soil. The August 2011 TCE concentration of 78 µg/L in monitoring well RW-05 (based on the most recent round of sampling at that location available to the optimization review team), further suggests the potential that a source of groundwater contamination remains in this area. The reviewers provided recommendations to improve remedy effectiveness and accelerate site closure. http://clu-in.org/Optimization/reportsDetail.cfm?opEvalID=128


Demonstrations / Feasibility Studies
ASSESSMENT OF THE NATURAL ATTENUATION OF NAPL SOURCE ZONES AND POST-TREATMENT NAPL SOURCE ZONE RESIDUALS
Johnson, P., R. Ekre, R. Krajmalnik-Brown, B. Rittman, P. Lundegard, and R. Hinchee.
ESTCP Project ER-200705, 416 pp, 2013

This project demonstrated a generalized data-driven paradigm for the assessment of source zone natural attenuation (SZNA) at chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon (CAH) cleanup sites. The method uses multiple lines of evidence and macroscopic mass balances, leading to confirmation of SZNA and quantification of the total mass loss rate resulting from degradation, dissolved-phase transport, and volatilization. Application of the method was demonstrated at three field sites, with multiple events per site spread out over about three years. The mass loss rates were relatively consistent over time for each site, but varied from site to site, ranging between about 1 to 10 kg/y at two sites and as high as about 600 kg/y at the third site. http://www.estcp.com/content/download/27662/274807/file/ER-200705-FR.pdf


SOLVING MINE WATER PROBLEMS WITH PEAT-BASED SORPTION MEDIA
Eger, P., P. Jones, and D. Green.
West Virginia Mine Drainage Task Force Symposium, Morgantown, West Virginia, March 25-26, 2014. Abstract and 41 slides, 2014

A patented carbonization process is used to convert raw reed sedge peat into APTsorb™, a granular, hardened ion-exchange material with high affinity for trace metals, particularly lead. An APTsorb™ pilot test was initiated at a base metal mine in North America in October 2013. The pilot was designed to model both an active (pressurized tank) and a passive (biocell) treatment system approach. A pressurized sand filter was installed before both systems. Input mine water had a pH >7 and contained about 1,500 µg/L Pb, 100 µg/L Zn, and 1.5 µg/L Cd. The sand filter essentially removed all suspended metals, but removal decreased as the pressure drop over the filter increased. Both pilot systems removed >99% of the Pb and reduced all metals to below permit values. In a model of full-scale treatment for a mine discharge of 8,000 gpm, capital costs were ~$5 million, about a factor of three less than a standard chemical treatment plot.
Slides: http://wvmdtaskforce.com/proceedings/14/Eger-1030-wv-task-force-2014-aptsorb-3-14.pdf
Longer abstract: http://wvmdtaskforce.com/proceedings/14/Eger-peat-based-absorption.pdf


PASSIVE BIOREMEDIATION OF MINING INFLUENCED WATER USING SULFATE REDUCING BIOREACTORS
Lee, I., L. Figueroa, E. Weiland, and D. Ramey.
West Virginia Mine Drainage Task Force Symposium, Morgantown, West Virginia, March 25-26, 2014. Abstract and 28 slides, 2014

The subject full-scale sulfate-reducing bioreactor (SRBR) had a volume of ~1,300 m3 and contained a mixture of wood chips, sawdust, hay, and manure. The influent flow rate varied from ~0.4 to 30 L/min, and influent iron and zinc concentrations varied by more than an order of magnitude. The passive, full-scale system was installed in 2009. The accumulation of aluminum and iron precipitates at the inlet piping and distribution system initially affected SRBR performance such that the influent zone was modified in the first year. During three additional years of operation, aluminum and iron minerals continued to precipitate in the distribution piping, albeit at a lesser rate. From this investigation of full-scale SRBR operation, the necessity of pre- and post-treatment for more efficient treatment of mine effluent is recommended.
Longer abstract: http://wvmdtaskforce.com/proceedings/14/Lee-Abstract-for-Passive-Bioremediation-of-Mining-Influenced-Water-Using-Sulfate-Reducing-Bioreactors.pdf
Slides: http://wvmdtaskforce.com/proceedings/14/Lee-1100-WV-Passive-SRBR-0326-14.pdf


IDAHO POLE COMPANY: PROPOSED IN SITU ENHANCED AEROBIC DEGRADATION PILOT STUDY
U.S. EPA Region 8, 66 pp, 2014

Groundwater monitoring at the Idaho Pole Company (Bozeman, Montana) indicates that pentachlorophenol (PCP) concentrations are declining at a rate likely to require several decades or more to achieve cleanup standards. Site conditions are favorable for using the current pump-and-treat system to deliver amendments to the aquifer that could accelerate PCP degradation. Following a detailed technology evaluation and screening, two aerobic degradation technologies involving injection of amended water (hydrogen peroxide solution and ex situ aerated) were retained for pilot testing. This work plan details the methods proposed for evaluating the effectiveness of the two technologies for enhancing aerobic degradation of PCP in the Idaho Pole groundwater. The evaluation will be conducted by performing a pilot study over a period of ~4 months just upgradient of an area where PCP concentrations recently have been observed up to 2,000 ppb. http://www2.epa.gov/region8/idaho-pole-co-pilot-study-work-plan-aerobic-degradation-pcp-groundwater



Research
VALIDATION OF A NOVEL BIOASSAY FOR LOW-LEVEL PERCHLORATE DETERMINATION
Coates, J.D.
ESTCP Project ER-201030, 191 pp, 2014

An enzymatic bioassay for determining the amount of perchlorate in an aqueous sample was developed initially under SERDP Project ER-1530. Under ESTCP Project ER-201030, the method was examined further to (1) compare benchtop bioassay results from testing in the primary investigator's lab to results from a reference analytical method performed by a commercial lab, and (2) compare results with a benchtop bioassay kit format tested by site field personnel to the site's routine perchlorate detection method (results varied). Because performance of the bioassay was insufficient to warrant proceeding with its field testing in a kit format, the focus of activities shifted to attempting to identify factors that interfere with the benchtop bioassay in order to determine whether operations and performance could be improved. http://www.estcp.com/content/download/27663/274817/file/Final%20Report%20ER-201030.pdf


ASSESSMENT OF SOIL MICROBIAL ACTIVITY BY NON- OR LOW INVASIVE METHODS
Schurig, Christian, Ph.D. dissertation, Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research - UFZ, Leipzig, Germany. ISSN: 1860-0387, 154 pp, 2013

This project investigated less invasive methods for the assessment of soil microbial activity under in situ conditions using the well-established BACTRAP® in situ microcosm system adapted to direct-push technology. A field test revealed that the DP-BACTRAP probe is applicable to use in an aquifer and compares better to in situ soil conditions than conventional use of the BACTRAP system. In the laboratory, the DP-BACTRAP probe established hydraulic equilibration with the surrounding soil under vadose zone conditions within 2-3 days, thereby facilitating microbial colonization of the supplied activated carbon. Hexadecane was used as a model compound for crude oil contamination at a field site in a comparison experiment between BACTRAPs and other commonly used soil incubation microcosms. Results indicated similar performance, thus demonstrating the general applicability of the approach for this type of contaminant under vadose zone conditions. https://www.ufz.de/export/data/global/55998_ufz-diss_07-2013.pdf


REJUVENATE: CROP BASED SYSTEMS FOR SUSTAINABLE RISK BASED LAND MANAGEMENT FOR ECONOMICALLY MARGINAL DEGRADED LAND: SHORT GUIDE FOR DECISION SUPPORT TOOL
Andersson-Skoeld, Y., R.P. Bardos, and T. Track.
SNOWMAN (Sustainable management of soil and groundwater under the pressure of soil pollution and soil contamination), 126 pp, 2013

The Rejuvenate project (http://projects.swedgeo.se/r2/) was carried out by organizations from the United Kingdom, Sweden, Rumania, the Netherlands, Germany, and Belgium. The Rejuvenate decision support tool is designed to provide a framework for assessing the opportunities and risks of using nonfood crops as a management method for marginal or degraded land, particularly brownfields and other previously developed or contaminated areas. The tool offers a systematic analysis of opportunities and health, environmental, social, and economic risks based on impacts and constraints ranging from site-specific to regional. The tool is set up in four broad stages, and each can be used to refine choices for biorenewables on marginal land. http://www.snowmannetwork.com/upload/documents/call2vienna/Rejuvenate%20%20DST%20guide_130329.pdf


PHYTOREMEDIATION OF SALT AND PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON IMPACTED SOIL
Metzger, M., P. Gerwing, B. Greenberg, X.-D. Huang, P. Mosley, K. Gerhardt, X.-M. Yu, S. Liddycoat, X. Lu, B. McCallum, G. MacNeill, and N. Kroetsch. SMART 2013: Smart Methods in Advanced Remediation Technologies, Calgary, Canada. 43 slides, 2013

Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR)-enhanced phytoremediation systems (PEPS) have been deployed at over 35 sites in Canada for full-scale removal of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) and salt from soil. PEPS provide large amounts of root biomass in contaminated soil, which promotes growth of rhizosphere microorganisms. The root and rhizosphere biomass allows rapid partitioning of contaminants out of the soil and their subsequent uptake and/or metabolism by microbes and plants. These processes result in degradation of PHCs in soil and large amounts of biomass for sequestration of salt into plant foliage. PEPS deployment has achieved ~35% remediation per year of PHC from soil (mostly F2, F3, and F4). Both grasses and cereals take up sufficient amounts of salt to result in 10-20% remediation per year. PEPS implementation has demonstrated that it is very effective for treatment of a wide variety of PHC- and salt-impacted sites, including sites with co-contaminants. Slides: http://www.smartremediation.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/Phytoremediation-of-Salt-and-Petroleum-Hydrocarbon-Impacted-Soil_Perry-Gerwing.pdf


SPECIAL SERIES: PASSIVE SAMPLING METHODS FOR CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS
Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management, Vol 10 No 2, 163-236, 2014

This special series of six Open Access papers was generated from the SETAC Technical Workshop, "Guidance on Passive Sampling Methods to Improve Management of Contaminated Sediments," held November 2012 in Costa Mesa, California. Forty-five experts&emdash;passive sampling method (PSM) developers, users, and decision-makers from academia, government, and industry&emdash;convened to review the state of science to gain consensus on PSM applications in assessing management actions on contaminated sediments. Recent advances in PSMs offer an improvement in risk-based decision-making because bioavailability of sediment contaminants can be directly quantified. The following topics are covered:
  1. Building consensus to improve decision making (pp 163-166).
  2. State of the science for organic contaminants (pp 167-178).
  3. State of the science for metals (pp 179-196).
  4. Scientific rationale supporting use of freely dissolved concentrations (pp 197-209).
  5. Practical guidance for selection, calibration, and implementation (pp 210-223).
  6. Risk assessment and management (pp 224-236).
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ieam.v10.2/issuetoc


CALCULATING THE DIFFUSIVE FLUX OF PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS BETWEEN SEDIMENTS AND THE WATER COLUMN ON THE PALOS VERDES SHELF SUPERFUND SITE USING POLYMERIC PASSIVE SAMPLERS
Fernandez, L.A., W. Lao, K. Maruya, and R.M. Burgess.
Environmental Science & Technology, Vol 48 No 7, 3925-3934, 2014

Passive samplers were used to determine water concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the surface sediments and near-bottom water of a marine Superfund site on the Palos Verdes Shelf, California. Measured concentrations in the porewater and water column at four stations were used to calculate the flux of POPs, including DDE, DDD, DDMU, and selected PCB congeners, across the sediment-water interface due to molecular diffusion. Three passive sampling materials were compared: polyethylene (PE) strips, polyoxymethylene (POM) strips, and solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers. Performance reference compounds (PRCs) were used with PE and POM to correct for incomplete equilibration, and the resulting POP concentrations determined by each material agreed within one order of magnitude. SPME fibers, without PRC corrections, produced values that were generally much lower (one to two orders of magnitude) than those measured using PE and POM. In addition, diffusive fluxes measured within the Superfund site using PE strips at stations outside a pilot remedial sand cap area were similar to those measured at a station inside the capped area: 240 to 260 ng/cm2/y for p,p'-DDE. This work demonstrates the utility of passive samplers for making in situ flux measurements at contaminated sediment sites.


SPECIAL SERIES: ECOLOGICAL SOIL CLEAN-UP VALUES FOR METALS
Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management, Vol 10 No 3, 342-414, 2014

This special series of six Open Access papers documents the results of group discussions at the workshop, "Ecological Soil Levels: Next Steps in the Development of Metal Clean-Up Values," held September 17-21, 2012, in Sundance, Utah.
  1. Next steps in the development of ecological soil clean-up values for metals (pp 342-345).
  2. Deriving site-specific clean-up criteria to protect ecological receptors (plants and soil invertebrates) exposed to metal or metalloid soil contaminants via the direct contact exposure pathway (pp 346-357).
  3. Furthering the derivation of predictive wildlife toxicity reference values for use in soil cleanup decisions (pp 358-371).
  4. Recommendations to improve wildlife exposure estimation for development of soil screening and cleanup values (pp 372-387).
  5. Deriving site-specific soil clean-up values for metals and metalloids: Rationale for including protection of soil microbial processes (pp 388-400).
  6. Regulatory considerations for the potential development and application of metal cleanup values (pp 401-414).
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ieam.v10.3/issuetoc



General News
CHECKLIST: HOW TO ADDRESS CHANGING CLIMATE CONCERNS IN AN ANALYSIS OF BROWNFIELD CLEANUP ALTERNATIVES (ABCA)
EPA 560-Q-14-001, 2 pp, 2014

To ensure that brownfield cleanups remain effective despite climate changes EPA has added a new term and condition to its cooperative agreements, starting with the FY13 Cleanup and Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grants, that requires recipients to "evaluate the resilience of the remedial options in light of reasonably foreseeable changing climate conditions (e.g., sea level rise, increased frequency and intensity of flooding, and/or extreme weather events, etc.)." EPA has created a brownfield cleanup alternatives checklist to help Cleanup and RLF grant recipients meet this new term and condition. http://www.epa.gov/brownfields/sustain_plts/factsheets/EPA_OBLR_Climate_Adaptation_Checklist.pdf


WETPOL 2013: 5TH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON WETLAND POLLUTANT DYNAMICS AND CONTROL, 13-17 OCTOBER 2013, NANTES, FRANCE
Ecole des Mines de Nantes, GEPEA laboratory, 365 pp, 2013

The capacity of wetlands to retain, accumulate, and degrade pollutants in both urban and rural environments has been recognized for decades. The WETPOL symposium, established in 2005, has become a reference forum for the fundamental knowledge on pollutant dynamics and control inside wetland systems, with an emphasis on wetlands constructed specifically to control or mitigate the impact of pollutants on the environment. Every two years, leading experts meet and present their research activities and experiences and discuss new concepts and new technologies. The extended abstracts from WETPOL 2013 are posted in 10 separate PDF chapters at http://www.emn.fr/z-ener/wetpol2013/index.php?page=book-of-abstracts.


ANALYSIS OF SUPERFUND SITE ASSESSMENT PROGRAM COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH STATES: BENEFITS OF EFFECTIVE STATE AND FEDERAL PARTNERSHIPS
ASTSWMO Site Evaluation Focus Group.
Association of State and Territorial Solid Waste Management Officials, 73 pp, 2014

This report follows up on the findings of the Superfund Site Assessment Program: Benefits beyond NLP Listing reports. The previous reports collected and reported the numbers of non-NPL outcomes on a national scale, however, their scope did not include investigating how these beneficial outcomes occur. This analysis reports how states (1) leverage CERCLA site assessment work products to achieve cleanup outcomes, both NPL and non-NPL; (2) use their site assessment cooperative agreement funding; (3) employ efficiencies and best practices to improve the site assessment program; and (4) track non-NPL beneficial outcomes of sites evaluated with their site assessment cooperative agreement funding. http://www.astswmo.org/Files/Policies_and_Publications/CERCLA_and_Brownfields/2014-05-Site_Evaluation_FG-Analysis_of_Superfund_Site_Assessment_CAs_w_States.pdf


PREDICTION AND MINIMIZATION OF EMISSIONS DURING DECONSTRUCTION MEASURES: TECHNICAL GUIDELINE
Hagemann, P., M. Kuehne, and S. Bartke.
TIMBRE Project WP5 status-D5.3, 56 pp, 2013

Each demolition or refurbishment measure at a brownfield site causes emissions (e.g., gases, liquids, solids, noise, heat, vibration, light) that affect people, technical equipment and infrastructure directly related to the construction site and the surrounding area. This report describes typical emissions resulting from brownfield site redevelopment, emission prediction methods, and measures for minimization. http://www.andrea-kubitz.de/timbre/tl_files/timbre/Intern/4%20Work%20Packages/WP8/Deliverables/timbre_265364_D5.3_v3.pdf


LEAD-BASED PAINT GUIDANCE: FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
Naval Facilities Engineering Command, NAVFAC Ltr 5090 Ser 13008/EV3-KB, Jan 2014

Many Navy installations receive requests to evaluate lead-based paint at cleanup sites. Each RPM is encouraged to discuss site-specific conditions with the respective Facilities Engineering Command ER manager to determine if circumstances allow for Environmental Restoration eligibility. This FAQ guide assists with identifying issues and promoting a consistent approach for dealing with lead-based paint at Navy Environmental Restoration sites. http://www.navfac.navy.mil/content/dam/navfac/Specialty%20Centers/Engineering%20and%20Expeditionary%20Warfare%20Center/Environmental/Restoration/er_pdfs/gpr/navfac-ev-guid-lbp-20140131f.pdf


TOOLKIT FOR PREPARING FIVE-YEAR REVIEWS
Naval Facilities Engineering Command, 17 pp, Dec 2013

The Navy has developed a toolkit to provide its RPMs with a resource to help improve the transparency and clarity of five-year reviews developed in accordance with CERCLA. The toolkit presents the use of visual communication methods that can enhance the review's overall presentation and emphasize the data, analysis, and rationale used to ensure protection of human health and the environment. Each of the 13 exhibits contains a "Toolkit Tip" to improve the quality and transparency of data presentation. The examples in the document neither replace existing Navy policy and EPA guidance nor substitute statutory and regulatory requirements for a five-year review. It is important during development of a review to include the level of detail recommended by EPA's Comprehensive Five-Year Review Guidance (OSWER 9355.7-03B-P, 2001) and consider the use of streamlining and visualization tools for better presentation of electronic data. http://www.navfac.navy.mil/navfac_worldwide/specialty_centers/exwc/products_and_services/ev/erb/5-yr-rvw.html



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Mention of non-EPA documents, presentations, or papers does not constitute a U.S. EPA endorsement of their contents, only an acknowledgment that they exist and may be relevant to the Technology Innovation News Survey audience.