U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

Training & Events

Upcoming Internet Seminars
More Information

Participant Comments

CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
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ERT Presents Development of Ecological Preliminary Remediation Goals

This seminar provides an overview of Ecological Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs) for common terrestrial and aquatic receptors. The seminar begins with a general discussion and background information about ecological PRGs. Topics included in the presentation include description of performance measures, criteria with which PRGs must comply, how PRGs are derived and used, and how background is incorporated into the PRG process. In addition, there will be a brief discussion pertaining to how risk management in considered in the PRG process.

NARPM Presents...Evaluating Completion of Groundwater Restoration Remedial Actions

This session is designed to assist RPMs, EPA technical support staff, and states in understanding EPA's new guidance for evaluating remedial action completion for groundwater restoration projects. The training will be based on the "Guidance for Evaluating Completion of Groundwater Restoration Remedial Action," November 2013; "Recommended Approach for Evaluating Completion of Groundwater Restoration Remedial Actions," August 2014; and the Groundwater Statistical Tool, August 2014.

This training will assist participants in understanding how groundwater contaminant well data and site-specific conditions may be evaluated to assess whether restoration of a contaminated aquifer is complete. By taking this webinar, participants will achieve the following objectives:
  • Understand EPA's recommendations for determining if a groundwater restoration remedial action is complete;
  • Understand recommendations for evaluating contaminant of concern concentration levels on a well-by-well basis;
  • Be exposed to the groundwater statistics tool and understand how it may be used to evaluate well-specific data; and
  • Understand how well-specific conclusions may be used to make a determination that the restoration remedial action is complete.

NARPM Presents...ICs in Decision Documents

Join in this seminar to learn about effective documentation of Institutional Controls (ICs) in Superfund decision documents. This webinar will help Remedial Project Managers (RPMs) and IC Coordinators better understand the specific requirements for formally documenting ICs in Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD), Record of Decision (ROD) Amendments, and RODs. Participants will hear both the regional and headquarters' perspective on the appropriate use of ICs in remedy decisions, as well as be provided with site-specific examples. The presenters will identify the expectations of the NCP, as well as explore additional policy and guidance to assist RPMs in documenting ICs. Finally, participants will understand how properly documented ICs can help ensure meaningful public involvement as well as facilitate the development of the Institutional Control Implementation and Assurance Plans (ICIAPs).

NARPM Presents...Interactions between Superfund and RCRA - Case Studies and Review

The interface between RCRA and Superfund is diverse, whether it is waste analysis and disposal or an adjacent RCRA Corrective Action site with co-mingling plumes. The goal of this webinar is to inform Superfund RPMs, and others, of the RCRA process be it regulation, guidance or personal interactions between the programs. Case Studies from Superfund RPMs and RCRA Corrective Action PMs will provide real world examples of this interaction. In addition, a high-level overview of RCRA is provided to set up each case study example.

Porewater Concentrations and Bioavailability: How You Can Measure Them and Why They Influence Contaminated Sediment Remediation - Session II - PSDs for Organic Contaminants

This is the second session of the Porewater Concentrations and Bioavailability: How You Can Measure Them and Why They Influence Contaminated Sediment Remediation seminar series. This session is titled: PSDs for Organic Contaminants. NARPM Presents and Risk e-Learning are offering a four-part webinar series to help you understand why, how, and when to measure porewater concentrations and bioavailability as part of contaminated sediment assessment and management. Hosted jointly by the EPA Contaminated Sediments Forum and the National Institute of Environmental Health Science’s Superfund Research Program, this webinar series will also focus on the use of passive sampling devices (PSD) and what they tell us about contaminant bioavailability. Previously held as a course at the National Association for Remedial Project Managers (NARPM) Training Program meeting, the webinar series features experts in the field of porewater and bioavailability and includes lectures and case studies, including practical tips to maximize the utility of porewater and bioavailability measurements. Presenters will explain the basics of chemical fate, transport, and uptake, with a focus on porewater as a key route of exposure and a strong indicator of bioavailability. PSDs are a promising technology for measuring porewater concentrations and assessing bioavailability, particularly for common sediment contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), chlorinated pesticides, and dioxin-like compounds. The webinar series will include information about direct measurements of porewater, such as centrifuging sediment samples or Henry Samplers, which may also be used and are particularly useful for measuring metals.

Porewater Concentrations and Bioavailability: How You Can Measure Them and Why They Influence Contaminated Sediment Remediation - Session IV - Case Studies: PSDs for Organic Contaminants

This is the fourth session of the Porewater Concentrations and Bioavailability: How You Can Measure Them and Why They Influence Contaminated Sediment Remediation seminar series. This session is titled Case Studies: PSDs for Organic Contaminants. NARPM Presents and Risk e-Learning are offering a four-part webinar series to help you understand why, how, and when to measure porewater concentrations and bioavailability as part of contaminated sediment assessment and management. Hosted jointly by the EPA Contaminated Sediments Forum and the National Institute of Environmental Health Science’s Superfund Research Program, this webinar series will also focus on the use of passive sampling devices (PSD) and what they tell us about contaminant bioavailability. Previously held as a course at the National Association for Remedial Project Managers (NARPM) Training Program meeting, the webinar series features experts in the field of porewater and bioavailability and includes lectures and case studies, including practical tips to maximize the utility of porewater and bioavailability measurements. Presenters will explain the basics of chemical fate, transport, and uptake, with a focus on porewater as a key route of exposure and a strong indicator of bioavailability. PSDs are a promising technology for measuring porewater concentrations and assessing bioavailability, particularly for common sediment contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), chlorinated pesticides, and dioxin-like compounds. The webinar series will include information about direct measurements of porewater, such as centrifuging sediment samples or Henry Samplers, which may also be used and are particularly useful for measuring metals.

Porewater Concentrations and Bioavailability: How You Can Measure Them and Why They Influence Contaminated Sediment Remediation - Session III - Metals and PSDs

This is the third session of the Porewater Concentrations and Bioavailability: How You Can Measure Them and Why They Influence Contaminated Sediment Remediation seminar series. This session is titled: Metals and PSDs. NARPM Presents and Risk e-Learning are offering a four-part webinar series to help you understand why, how, and when to measure porewater concentrations and bioavailability as part of contaminated sediment assessment and management. Hosted jointly by the EPA Contaminated Sediments Forum and the National Institute of Environmental Health Science’s Superfund Research Program, this webinar series will also focus on the use of passive sampling devices (PSD) and what they tell us about contaminant bioavailability. Previously held as a course at the National Association for Remedial Project Managers (NARPM) Training Program meeting, the webinar series features experts in the field of porewater and bioavailability and includes lectures and case studies, including practical tips to maximize the utility of porewater and bioavailability measurements. Presenters will explain the basics of chemical fate, transport, and uptake, with a focus on porewater as a key route of exposure and a strong indicator of bioavailability. PSDs are a promising technology for measuring porewater concentrations and assessing bioavailability, particularly for common sediment contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), chlorinated pesticides, and dioxin-like compounds. The webinar series will include information about direct measurements of porewater, such as centrifuging sediment samples or Henry Samplers, which may also be used and are particularly useful for measuring metals.

Overview of New EPA Superfund Groundwater Guidance and Tools

Groundwater remediation is a component of more than 90 percent of active Superfund sites and achieving remedial action objectives can take years or even decades. Collectively federal agencies, states and potentially responsible parties (PRPs) spend hundreds of millions of dollars each year to address contaminated groundwater. Given the importance of groundwater, the challenges and costs associated with groundwater remedies, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recently issued a new suite of guidance and tools to help focus resources on the information and decisions needed to effectively complete groundwater remedies and to ensure that these remedies protect human health and the environment. This 1 hour webinar will describe the benefits and utility of the following recently issued EPA guidance and tools:

  • Guidance for Evaluating Completion of Groundwater Restoration Actions (Nov. 2013)
  • Groundwater Remedy Completion Strategy (May 2014)
  • Recommended Approach for Evaluating Completion of Groundwater Restoration Remedial Actions at a Groundwater Monitoring Well (Aug. 2014)
  • Groundwater Statistical Tool (Aug. 2014)

The above EPA groundwater guidance and other resources are available on EPA's website at http://www.epa.gov/superfund/health/conmedia/gwdocs/.

Participants may also be interested in the webinar on Evaluating Completion of Groundwater Restoration Remedial Actions on November 12, 2014, 1:00PM-3:00PM, EDT (18:00-20:00 GMT).

Mining Remediation and Sustainability

This webinar features three presentations delivered at the 2014 National Conference on Mining Influenced Waters (MIW). The session highlights EPA's efforts to identify lower-maintenance and innovative MIW treatment technologies, work being conducted by the International Network for Acid Prevention (INAP), and efforts undertaken by Barrick Gold Corporation to clean up and implement best industry practices at a mining-impacted river in the Dominican Republic.

Water Treatment: Iron Mountain Mine and Bunker Hill Mining and Metallurgical Complex Superfund Sites

This webinar features three presentations on mining-influenced water (MIW) treatment delivered at the 2014 National Conference on Mining Influenced Waters. The session focuses on approaches to MIW treatment, operations and maintenance (O&M) challenges, and characterization and remediation of MIW treatment issues at two Superfund sites.
Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


Soil Sampling and Decision Making Using Incremental Sampling Methodology - Part 1

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council When sampling soil at potentially contaminated sites, the goal is collecting representative samples which will lead to quality decisions. Unfortunately traditional soil sampling methods don't always provide the accurate, reproducible, and defensible data needed. Incremental Sampling Methodology (ISM) can help with this soil sampling challenge. ISM is a structured composite sampling and processing protocol that reduces data variability and provides a reasonable estimate of a chemical's mean concentration for the volume of soil being sampled. The three key components of ISM are systematic planning, field sample collection, and laboratory processing and analysis. The adequacy of ISM sample support (sample mass) reduces sampling and laboratory errors, and the ISM strategy improves the reliability and defensibility of sampling data by reducing data variability.

ISM provides representative samples of specific soil volumes defined as Decision Units. An ISM replicate sample is established by collecting numerous increments of soil (typically 30 to 100 increments) that are combined, processed, and subsampled according to specific protocols. ISM is increasingly being used for sampling soils at hazardous waste sites and on suspected contaminated lands. Proponents have found that the coverage afforded by collecting many increments, together with disciplined processing and subsampling of the combined increments, yields consistent and reproducible results that in most instances have been preferable to the results obtained by more traditional (e.g. discrete) sampling approaches.

This 2-part training course along with ITRC's web-based Incremental Sampling Methodology Technical and Regulatory Guidance Document (ISM-1, 2012) is intended to assist regulators and practitioners with the understanding the fundamental concepts of soil/contaminant heterogeneity, representative sampling, sampling/laboratory error and how ISM addresses these concepts. Through this training course you should learn:

  • basic principles to improve soil sampling results
  • systematic planning steps important to ISM
  • how to determine ISM Decision Units (DU)
  • the answers to common questions about ISM sampling design and data analysis
  • methods to collect and analyze ISM soil samples
  • the impact of laboratory processing on soil samples
  • how to evaluate ISM data and make decisions

In addition this ISM training and guidance provides insight on when and how to apply ISM at a contaminated site, and will aid in developing or reviewing project documents incorporating ISM (e.g., work plans, sampling plans, reports). You will also be provided with links to additional resources related to ISM.

The intended users of this guidance and training course are state and federal regulators, project managers, and consultant personnel responsible for and/or directly involved in developing, identifying or applying soil and sediment sampling approaches and establishing sampling objectives and methods. In addition, data end users and decision makers will gain insight to the use and impacts of ISM for soil sampling for potentially contaminated sites.

Recommended Reading: We encourage participants to review the ITRC ISM document(http://www.itrcweb.org/ISM-1/) prior to participating in the training classes. If your time is limited in reviewing the document in advance, we suggest you prioritize your time by reading the Executive Summary, Chapter 4 "Statistical Sampling Designs for ISM," and Chapter 7 "Making Decisions Using ISM Data" to maximize your learning experience during the upcoming training classes.

Project Risk Management for Site Remediation

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Remediation Risk Management (RRM) is a course of action through which all risks related to the remediation processes (site investigations, remedy selection, execution, and completion) are holistically addressed in order to maximize the certainty in the cleanup process to protect human health and the environment. Remediation decisions to achieve such a goal should be made based on threshold criteria on human health and ecological risks, while considering all the other potential project risks. Through this training course and associated ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance Document: Project Risk Management for Site Remediation (RRM-1, 2011), the ITRC RRM team presents tools and processes that can help the site remediation practitioner anticipate, plan for, and mitigate many of the most common obstacles to a successful site remediation project. Examples of project risks include remediation technology feasibility risks; remedy selection risks; remedy construction, operation and monitoring risks; remedy performance and operations risks; environmental impacts of systems during their operation; worker safety risk, human health and ecological impacts due to remedy operation; as well as costs and schedules risks including funding and contracting issues. You should learn: the principles and elements of Remediation Risk Management (RRM); the importance and benefits of RRM; how to implement RRM based on a discussion of case studies: how RRM can help you achieve more successful remediation; and how to use the ITRC RRM information to your benefit.

Integrated DNAPL Site Strategy

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Sites contaminated by chlorinated solvents present a daunting environmental challenge, especially at sites with dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) still present. Restoring sites contaminated by chlorinated solvents to typical regulatory criteria (low parts-per-billion concentrations) within a generation (~20 years) has proven exceptionally difficult, although there have been successes. Site managers must recognize that complete restoration of many of these sites will require prolonged treatment and involve several remediation technologies. To make as much progress as possible requires a thorough understanding of the site, clear descriptions of achievable objectives, and use of more than one remedial technology. Making efficient progress will require an adaptive management approach, and may also require transitioning from one remedy to another as the optimum range of a technique is surpassed. Targeted monitoring should be used and re-evaluation should be done periodically.

This ITRC Integrated Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquid Site Strategy (IDSS-1, 2011) technical and regulatory guidance document will assist site managers in development of an integrated site remedial strategy. This course highlights five important features of an IDSS including:

  1. A conceptual site model (CSM) that is based on reliable characterization and an understanding of the subsurface conditions that control contaminant transport, reactivity, and distribution
  2. Remedial objectives and performance metrics that are clear, concise, and measureable
  3. Treatment technologies applied to optimize performance and take advantage of potential synergistic effects
  4. Monitoring based on interim and final cleanup objectives, the selected treatment technology and approach, and remedial performance goals
  5. Reevaluating the strategy repeatedly and even modifying the approach when objectives are not being met or when alternative methods offer similar or better outcomes at lower cost

This IDSS guidance and training is intended for regulators, remedial project managers, and remediation engineers responsible for sites contaminated by chlorinated solvents. Because the subject matter is complex, this guidance assumes a functional understanding of the field and is targeted towards experienced users; however, novices will benefit through descriptions and references of the latest evolution of site characterization challenges; realistic planning of site restoration; evolving treatment techniques; and evaluating, monitoring and interpreting mass transport in the subsurface aqueous and vapor phases. While the primary focus of the document is on DNAPL sites, other types of contaminated sites (e.g. petroleum, mixed contaminants, etc.) can use the same fundamental process described in this guidance.

For reference during the training class, participants should have a copy of the flow diagram, Figure 1-2 on page 6 of the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance document, ITRC Integrated Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquid Site Strategy (IDSS-1, 2011) and available as a 1-page PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/IDSS/ITRC-IDSS-1-Figure1-2.pdf.

Mining Waste Treatment Technology Selection

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Mining produces millions of tons of waste each year. Contaminants from unreclaimed or unremediated areas have affected millions of acres of land and over 10,000 miles of stream. Historical mining practices and the absence of routine mined-land reclamation, remediation, and restoration have led to legacy sites with significant environmental and human health impacts. New mining operations continue to have severe waste issues that must be addressed during and after the actual mining operation. Conventional remedial solutions are often lengthy, expensive, and unacceptable to the regulated and regulatory communities, as well as to the public.

ITRC's Mining Waste Team developed the ITRC Web-based Mining Waste Technology Selection site to assist project managers in selecting an applicable technology, or suite of technologies, which can be used to remediate mine waste contaminated sites. Decision trees, through a series of questions, guide users to a set of treatment technologies that may be applicable to that particular site situation. Each technology is described, along with a summary of the applicability, advantages, limitations, performance, stakeholder and regulatory considerations, and lessons learned. Each technology overview links to case studies where the technology has been implemented. In this associated Internet-based training, instructors provide background information then take participants through the decision tree using example sites. Project managers, regulators, site owners, and community stakeholders should attend this training class to learn how to use the ITRC Web-based Mining Waste Technology Selection site to identify appropriate technologies, address all impacted media, access case studies, and understand potential regulatory constraints.

Biochemical Reactors for Treating Mining Influenced Water

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Mining influenced water (MIW) includes aqueous wastes generated by ore extraction and processing, as well as mine drainage and tailings runoff. MIW handling, storage, and disposal is a major environmental problem in mining districts throughout the U.S and around the world. Biochemical reactors (BCRs) are engineered treatment systems that use an organic substrate to drive microbial and chemical reactions to reduce concentrations of metals, acidity, and sulfate in MIWs. The ITRC Biochemical Reactors for Mining-Influenced Water technology guidance (BCR-1, 2013) and this associated Internet-based training provide an in-depth examination of BCRs; a decision framework to assess the applicability of BCRs; details on testing, designing, constructing and monitoring BCRs; and real world BCR case studies with diverse site conditions and chemical mixtures. At the end of this training, you should be able to complete the following activities:
  • Describe a BCR and how it works
  • Identify when a BCR is applicable to a site
  • Use the ITRC guidance for decision making by applying the decision framework
  • Improve site decision making through understanding of BCR advantages, limitations, reasonable expectations, regulatory and other challenges
  • Navigate the ITRC Biochemical Reactors for Mining-Influenced Water technology guidance (BCR-1, 2013)

For reference during the training class, participants should have a copy of Figure 2-1, decision flow process for determining the applicability of a biochemical reactor. It is also available as a 1-page PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/BCR/ITRC-BCRforMIW-DecisionFlow.pdf.

Participants should also be familiar with the ITRC technology and regulatory guidance for Mining-Waste Treatment Technology Selection (MW-1, 2010) and associated Internet-based training that helps regulators, consultants, industry, and stakeholders in selecting an applicable technology, or suite of technologies, which can be used to remediate mining sites.

Remedy Selection for Contaminated Sediments

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council The sediments underlying many of our nation’s major waterways are contaminated with toxic pollutants from past industrial activities. Cleaning up contaminated sediments is expensive and technically-challenging. Sediment sites are unique, complex, and require a multidisciplinary approach and often project managers lack sediments experience. ITRC developed the technical and regulatory guidance, Remedy Selection for Contaminated Sediments (CS-2, 2014), to assist decision-makers in identifying which contaminated sediment management technology is most favorable based on an evaluation of site specific physical, sediment, contaminant, and land and waterway use characteristics. The document provides a remedial selection framework to help identify favorable technologies, and identifies additional factors (feasibility, cost, stakeholder concerns, and others) that need to be considered as part of the remedy selection process. This ITRC training course supports participants with applying the technical and regulatory guidance as a tool to overcome the remedial challenges posed by contaminated sediment sites. Participants learn how to:
  • Identify site-specific characteristics and data needed for site decision making
  • Evaluate potential technologies based on site information
  • Select the most favorable contaminant management technology for their site
For reference during the training class, participants should have a copy of Figure 2-1, Framework for Sediment Remedy Evaluation. It is available as a 1-page PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/ContSedRem/ITRC-SedimentRemedyEvaluation.pdf.

Participants should also be familiar with the ITRC technology and regulatory guidance for Incorporating Bioavailability Considerations into the Evaluation of Contaminated Sediment Sites Website (CS-1, 2011) and associated Internet-based training that assists state regulators and practitioners with understanding and incorporating fundamental concepts of bioavailability in contaminated sediment management practices.

Groundwater Statistics for Environmental Project Managers

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Statistical techniques may be used throughout the process of cleaning up contaminated groundwater. It is challenging for practitioners, who are not experts in statistics, to interpret, and use statistical techniques. ITRC developed the Technical and Regulatory Web-based Guidance on Groundwater Statistics and Monitoring Compliance (GSMC-1, 2013, http://www.itrcweb.org/gsmc-1/) and this associated training specifically for environmental project managers who review or use statistical calculations for reports, who make recommendations or decisions based on statistics, or who need to demonstrate compliance for groundwater projects. The training class will encourage and support project managers and others who are not statisticians to:

ITRC's Technical and Regulatory Web-based Guidance on Groundwater Statistics and Monitoring Compliance (GSMC-1, 2013) and this associated training bring clarity to the planning, implementation, and communication of groundwater statistical methods and should lead to greater confidence and transparency in the use of groundwater statistics for site management.
The Training Exchange (Trainex)

The Training Exchange website (Trainex) is designed to provide a wide range of training information to EPA, other federal agency, state, tribal, and local staff involved in hazardous waste management and remediation. Trainex focuses on free training directed to federal and state staff. This site includes training schedules for deliveries of many courses, both classroom and Internet-based.

EPA works in partnership with organizations, such as the Interstate Technology Regulatory Council (ITRC), and other agencies, such as the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), to offer training relevant to hazardous waste remediation, site characterization, risk assessment, emergency response, site/incident management, counter-terrorism, and the community's role in site management and cleanup.

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