U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

Training & Events

Upcoming Internet Seminars
More Information

Participant Comments

CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
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SRI Webinar Series: Green Infrastructure: Reusing Superfund Sites and Promoting Sustainable Communities

This webinar will introduce green infrastructure elements in the context of reusing and revitalizing Superfund sites. Presenters will share site-specific reuse projects with green infrastructure elements such as habitat conservation, stormwater management, and recreational opportunities that increase quality of life for communities near the contaminated land. The webinar will also share green infrastructure considerations and opportunities for future projects looking to sustainably return contaminated lands to productive and beneficial use for communities.

SRI Webinar Series: Potentially Responsible Party (PRP) Perspectives on Superfund Site Reuse

A potentially responsible party, or PRP, is an individual or company that is potentially responsible for contamination problems at a Superfund site. Whenever possible, EPA requires PRPs to clean up hazardous waste sites the PRP may have contaminated. Many PRPs not only perform the cleanup, but also seek ways to return the site to beneficial use for the community and maximize the extent of land use on the site. Presenters on this webinar will include representatives from several PRP groups who have taken an active role in facilitating the beneficial use of sites they manage and who have worked collaboratively with EPA over many years to ensure that both the cleanup and the reuse of the property remain protective of human health and the environment.

Progress in Research: Reducing Exposure to Mercury, Arsenic, and Asbestos

This Superfund Research Program (SRP) Progress in Research webinar highlights exciting research from two SRP Centers. Scientists at the Dartmouth College SRP Center are working to reduce exposures to arsenic and mercury and to better understand how exposure to these contaminants leads to disease. You will also hear from scientists at the University of Pennsylvania SRP Center who are conducting research on asbestos waste, and how that waste affects human health.

Sources and Protracted Effects of Early Life Exposure to Arsenic and Mercury (Dartmouth College SRP Center, P42ES007373)

Despite growing concern and increasing research on arsenic and mercury, there are significant knowledge gaps, especially with regard to the very low levels of exposure found in the U.S. The Dartmouth College Toxic Metals SRP Center conducts multidisciplinary research to identify major sources of arsenic and mercury exposure and to better understand how early life exposure to these contaminants affects health. One project is studying a group of pregnant women who use private wells in New Hampshire where arsenic is a known contaminant to determine whether arsenic influences glucose and blood pressure control during pregnancy and to identify potential genetic susceptibility for these effects. Center members are also researching arsenic exposure from drinking water, rice, and other foods, and the effects of arsenic on the immune response to bacterial infections of the lungs. Their work also includes evaluation of the uptake, transport, and storage of arsenic in rice that could inform the development of new types of rice that accumulate less arsenic. Another area of study is methylmercury accumulation in fish and how environmental factors affect mercury in estuarine food webs, which are important pathways of exposure to humans. The Dartmouth SRP Center conducts research at three Superfund sites: the Androscoggin River in Berlin, New Hampshire, the Callahan Mine in Brooksville, Maine, and the Berry's Creek mercury site in Hackensack, New Jersey.

Asbestos Fate, Exposure, Remediation, and Adverse Health Effects (University of Pennsylvania SRP Center, P42ES023720)

The University of Pennsylvania (Penn) SRP Center is conducting research to solve problems and find solutions related to chrysotile asbestos fate, exposure, remediation, and adverse health effects, such as mesothelioma. The Center is driven by community-based concerns from people in Pennsylvania who live close to one of the largest asbestos Superfund sites in the country — the Ambler BoRit site. Each project in the Penn-SRP is driven by six community-based questions. Thus, Center researchers are working to identify biomarkers that indicate a person's risk to asbestos exposure and could potentially improve human health in the community. Researchers are also examining how social, lifestyle, and economic factors influence asbestos exposure and incidence of mesothelioma as well as developing safe, non-toxic agents such as flaxseed that might offer protection against asbestos-induced lung diseases. A tumor suppressor gene knockout mouse model, which is susceptible to mesothelioma is being used to study the pathogenesis of disease. Finally, researchers are investigating the remediation of asbestos-contaminated sites using fungi (Fusarium oxysporum and Verticillium leptobactrum) and the mobility and fate of asbestos particles through soil and groundwater. The Penn SRP is focused on the BoRit EPA region 3 Superfund site in the Ambler Borough, Upper Dublin, and Whitpain townships. Findings will be generally applicable to the other asbestos Superfund sites in the nation.

Progress in Research: TCE, PCBs, and Phthalates - Exposure, Mechanisms of Disease, and Clean-Up Remedies

This Superfund Research Program (SRP) Progress in Research webinar highlights exciting research from two SRP Centers. Scientists at the Dartmouth College SRP Center are working to reduce exposures to arsenic and mercury and to better understand how exposure to these contaminants leads to disease. You will also hear from scientists at the University of Pennsylvania SRP Center who are conducting research on asbestos waste, and how that waste affects human health.

Sources and Protracted Effects of Early Life Exposure to Arsenic and Mercury (Dartmouth College SRP Center, P42ES007373)

Despite growing concern and increasing research on arsenic and mercury, there are significant knowledge gaps, especially with regard to the very low levels of exposure found in the U.S. The Dartmouth College Toxic Metals SRP Center conducts multidisciplinary research to identify major sources of arsenic and mercury exposure and to better understand how early life exposure to these contaminants affects health. One project is studying a group of pregnant women who use private wells in New Hampshire where arsenic is a known contaminant to determine whether arsenic influences glucose and blood pressure control during pregnancy and to identify potential genetic susceptibility for these effects. Center members are also researching arsenic exposure from drinking water, rice, and other foods, and the effects of arsenic on the immune response to bacterial infections of the lungs. Their work also includes evaluation of the uptake, transport, and storage of arsenic in rice that could inform the development of new types of rice that accumulate less arsenic. Another area of study is methylmercury accumulation in fish and how environmental factors affect mercury in estuarine food webs, which are important pathways of exposure to humans. The Dartmouth SRP Center conducts research at three Superfund sites: the Androscoggin River in Berlin, New Hampshire, the Callahan Mine in Brooksville, Maine, and the Berry’s Creek mercury site in Hackensack, New Jersey.

Asbestos Fate, Exposure, Remediation, and Adverse Health Effects (University of Pennsylvania SRP Center, P42ES023720)

The University of Pennsylvania (Penn) SRP Center is conducting research to solve problems and find solutions related to chrysotile asbestos fate, exposure, remediation, and adverse health effects, such as mesothelioma. The Center is driven by community-based concerns from people in Pennsylvania who live close to one of the largest asbestos Superfund sites in the country – the Ambler BoRit site. Each project in the Penn-SRP is driven by six community-based questions. Thus, Center researchers are working to identify biomarkers that indicate a person’s risk to asbestos exposure and could potentially improve human health in the community. Researchers are also examining how social, lifestyle, and economic factors influence asbestos exposure and incidence of mesothelioma as well as developing safe, non-toxic agents such as flaxseed that might offer protection against asbestos-induced lung diseases. A tumor suppressor gene knockout mouse model, which is susceptible to mesothelioma is being used to study the pathogenesis of disease. Finally, researchers are investigating the remediation of asbestos-contaminated sites using fungi (Fusarium oxysporum and Verticillium leptobactrum) and the mobility and fate of asbestos particles through soil and groundwater. The Penn SRP is focused on the BoRit EPA region 3 Superfund site in the Ambler Borough, Upper Dublin, and Whitpain townships. Findings will be generally applicable to the other asbestos Superfund sites in the nation
Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


Integrated DNAPL Site Strategy

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Sites contaminated by chlorinated solvents present a daunting environmental challenge, especially at sites with dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) still present. Restoring sites contaminated by chlorinated solvents to typical regulatory criteria (low parts-per-billion concentrations) within a generation (~20 years) has proven exceptionally difficult, although there have been successes. Site managers must recognize that complete restoration of many of these sites will require prolonged treatment and involve several remediation technologies. To make as much progress as possible requires a thorough understanding of the site, clear descriptions of achievable objectives, and use of more than one remedial technology. Making efficient progress will require an adaptive management approach, and may also require transitioning from one remedy to another as the optimum range of a technique is surpassed. Targeted monitoring should be used and re-evaluation should be done periodically.

This ITRC Integrated Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquid Site Strategy (IDSS-1, 2011) technical and regulatory guidance document will assist site managers in development of an integrated site remedial strategy. This course highlights five important features of an IDSS including:

  1. A conceptual site model (CSM) that is based on reliable characterization and an understanding of the subsurface conditions that control contaminant transport, reactivity, and distribution
  2. Remedial objectives and performance metrics that are clear, concise, and measureable
  3. Treatment technologies applied to optimize performance and take advantage of potential synergistic effects
  4. Monitoring based on interim and final cleanup objectives, the selected treatment technology and approach, and remedial performance goals
  5. Reevaluating the strategy repeatedly and even modifying the approach when objectives are not being met or when alternative methods offer similar or better outcomes at lower cost

This IDSS guidance and training is intended for regulators, remedial project managers, and remediation engineers responsible for sites contaminated by chlorinated solvents. Because the subject matter is complex, this guidance assumes a functional understanding of the field and is targeted towards experienced users; however, novices will benefit through descriptions and references of the latest evolution of site characterization challenges; realistic planning of site restoration; evolving treatment techniques; and evaluating, monitoring and interpreting mass transport in the subsurface aqueous and vapor phases. While the primary focus of the document is on DNAPL sites, other types of contaminated sites (e.g. petroleum, mixed contaminants, etc.) can use the same fundamental process described in this guidance.

For reference during the training class, participants should have a copy of the flow diagram, Figure 1-2 on page 6 of the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance document, ITRC Integrated Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquid Site Strategy (IDSS-1, 2011) and available as a 1-page PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/IDSS/ITRC-IDSS-1-Figure1-2.pdf.

Remedy Selection for Contaminated Sediments

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council The sediments underlying many of our nation’s major waterways are contaminated with toxic pollutants from past industrial activities. Cleaning up contaminated sediments is expensive and technically-challenging. Sediment sites are unique, complex, and require a multidisciplinary approach and often project managers lack sediments experience. ITRC developed the technical and regulatory guidance, Remedy Selection for Contaminated Sediments (CS-2, 2014), to assist decision-makers in identifying which contaminated sediment management technology is most favorable based on an evaluation of site specific physical, sediment, contaminant, and land and waterway use characteristics. The document provides a remedial selection framework to help identify favorable technologies, and identifies additional factors (feasibility, cost, stakeholder concerns, and others) that need to be considered as part of the remedy selection process. This ITRC training course supports participants with applying the technical and regulatory guidance as a tool to overcome the remedial challenges posed by contaminated sediment sites. Participants learn how to:
  • Identify site-specific characteristics and data needed for site decision making
  • Evaluate potential technologies based on site information
  • Select the most favorable contaminant management technology for their site
For reference during the training class, participants should have a copy of Figure 2-1, Framework for Sediment Remedy Evaluation. It is available as a 1-page PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/ContSedRem/ITRC-SedimentRemedyEvaluation.pdf.

Participants should also be familiar with the ITRC technology and regulatory guidance for Incorporating Bioavailability Considerations into the Evaluation of Contaminated Sediment Sites Website (CS-1, 2011) and associated Internet-based training that assists state regulators and practitioners with understanding and incorporating fundamental concepts of bioavailability in contaminated sediment management practices.

Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Sites contaminated with dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) and DNAPL mixtures present significant environmental challenges. Despite the decades spent on characterizing and attempting to remediate DNAPL sites, substantial risk remains. Inadequate characterization of site geology as well as the distribution, characteristics, and behavior of contaminants -- by relying on traditional monitoring well methods rather than more innovative and integrated approaches -- has limited the success of many remediation efforts.

The Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization Team has synthesized the knowledge about DNAPL site characterization and remediation acquired over the past several decades, and has integrated that information into a new document, Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization and Tools Selection (ISC-1, 2015). This guidance is a resource to inform regulators, responsible parties, other problem holders, consultants, community stakeholders, and other interested parties of the critical concepts related to characterization approaches and tools for collecting subsurface data at DNAPL sites. After this associated training, participants will be able to use the ITRC Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization and Tools Selection (ISC-1, 2015) guidance to develop and support an integrated approach to DNAPL site characterization, including:
  • Identify what site conditions must be considered when developing an informative DNAPL conceptual site model (CSM)
  • Define an objectives-based DNAPL characterization strategy
  • Understand what tools and resources are available to improve the identification, collection, and evaluation of appropriate site characterization data
  • Navigate the DNAPL characterization tools table and select appropriate technologies to fill site-specific data gaps
For reference during the training class, participants should have a copy of Figure 4-1, the integrated site characterization flow diagram from the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance document: Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization and Tools Selection (ISC-1, 2015) and available as a PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/IDSC/ITRC-ISC-Figures.pdf.
The Training Exchange (Trainex)

The Training Exchange website (Trainex) is designed to provide a wide range of training information to EPA, other federal agency, state, tribal, and local staff involved in hazardous waste management and remediation. Trainex focuses on free training directed to federal and state staff. This site includes training schedules for deliveries of many courses, both classroom and Internet-based.

EPA works in partnership with organizations, such as the Interstate Technology Regulatory Council (ITRC), and other agencies, such as the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), to offer training relevant to hazardous waste remediation, site characterization, risk assessment, emergency response, site/incident management, counter-terrorism, and the community's role in site management and cleanup.

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