U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

Training & Events

Upcoming Internet Seminars
More Information

Participant Comments

CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
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CEC Preliminary Assessment/Site Inspection (PA/SI) Webinar Series, Module 8: SI Sampling Strategies for Groundwater and Surface Water

The CERCLA Education Center (CEC) is offering a nine-part Preliminary Assessment and Site Inspection (PA/SI) Webinar Series in June and July 2014. PA/SI is an intermediate training course designed for personnel who are required to compile, draft and review PA, SI and HRS documentation records and packages submitted for sites proposed for the National Priorities List (NPL). This course is open to EPA, federal, state, tribal and contractor personnel who support site investigation programs.

The PA/SI Webinar Series provides an introduction to the Superfund site assessment process and describes the preliminary assessment and site inspection phases of this process. The course will incorporate a mix of lecture and exercises using Quickscore for each of the four pathways. The objective of the exercise is to give participants the opportunity to evaluate and score PA information using the HRS Quickscore software. Participants will use information from a fictitious site to (1) evaluate and calculate a preliminary HRS score, and (2) develop release and target hypotheses that should be pursued in an SI.

In order to receive credit for taking the course, participants must participate in each session. If you are unable to make one of the sessions, archived versions will be made available at www.clu-in.org that you can take to receive credit for the missed live session. In order to receive credit for a missed session, you must complete the missed session within 2 months of the originally scheduled date and submit an evaluation form from that archived module.

This module will provide an overview of SI sampling strategies for the groundwater migration pathway and the surface water migration pathway.

CEC Preliminary Assessment/Site Inspection (PA/SI) Webinar Series, Module 9: SI Sampling Strategies for Soil and Air

The CERCLA Education Center (CEC) is offering a nine-part Preliminary Assessment and Site Inspection (PA/SI) Webinar Series in June and July 2014. PA/SI is an intermediate training course designed for personnel who are required to compile, draft and review PA, SI and HRS documentation records and packages submitted for sites proposed for the National Priorities List (NPL). This course is open to EPA, federal, state, tribal and contractor personnel who support site investigation programs.

The PA/SI Webinar Series provides an introduction to the Superfund site assessment process and describes the preliminary assessment and site inspection phases of this process. The course will incorporate a mix of lecture and exercises using Quickscore for each of the four pathways. The objective of the exercise is to give participants the opportunity to evaluate and score PA information using the HRS Quickscore software. Participants will use information from a fictitious site to (1) evaluate and calculate a preliminary HRS score, and (2) develop release and target hypotheses that should be pursued in an SI.

In order to receive credit for taking the course, participants must participate in each session. If you are unable to make one of the sessions, archived versions will be made available at www.clu-in.org that you can take to receive credit for the missed live session. In order to receive credit for a missed session, you must complete the missed session within 2 months of the originally scheduled date and submit an evaluation form from that archived module.

This module will provide an overview of SI sampling strategies for the soil exposure pathway and the air migration pathway.

If Cells Could Talk, What Would They Tell Us About Environmental Exposures? Applications of Cell-Based Bioanalytical Methods

This two-part seminar will feature Dr. Michael Denison of the University of California Davis Superfund Research Program (SRP) and Dr. Scott Boitano from the University of Arizona SRP, and will focus on applications of cell-based bioanalytical methods to better understand environmental toxicities.

The ability of toxic chemicals, such as dioxin-like chemicals and endocrine disruptors, to modulate intracellular receptor-mediated signal transduction is one way that diverse toxicants can produce common responses. In the laboratory, these cellular mechanisms can be taken advantage of and used to develop screening methods to better detect and quantitate such chemicals in a variety of sources to which people may be exposed. Dr. Denison will describe the development, validation, and screening applications of Chemically-Activated LUciferase eXpression (CALUX) cell bioassays.

Diseases associated with the airway often contain living cells with compromised cellular physiology. Thus, traditional cellular toxicity assays that measure cell death as a single toxicity endpoint may miss the more subtle sub-cytotoxic changes seen in airway epithelial cells. To better evaluate both cytotoxic and sub-cytotoxic changes, researchers have adapted a human airway epithelial cell line for use in the xCELLigence real time cell analyzer to evaluate concentration- and time-dependent effects of toxic compounds. Dr. Boitano will discuss these findings and how they allow us to better understand the toxicity impact of nanoparticles, metals and metalloids, as well as other toxicants, on airway health and disease.

Borehole Geophysics Applied to Bedrock Hydrogeologic Evaluations

This presentation introduces the viewer to borehole geophysical tools commonly used in hydrogeologic investigations. These tools include gamma, temperature, conductivity, caliper, borehole video, acoustic and optical televiewers, heat-pulse flowmeter, and borehole deviation.. Examples and case studies follow illustrating the usefulness of data obtained through the utilization of these tools, especially when used to design packer tests and multi-level discrete-zone sampling strings. In addition, borehole tools commonly used in shallow oil/gas well abandonment are presented.

Military Munitions Support Services - Explosives Safety

This is one of the monthly webinar sessions for the Military Munitions Support Services (M2S2) community. During this session, speakers will provide updates on explosives safety policy, processes, best practices, and incident review.
Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


Groundwater Statistics for Environmental Project Managers

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Statistical techniques may be used throughout the process of cleaning up contaminated groundwater. It is challenging for practitioners, who are not experts in statistics, to interpret, and use statistical techniques. ITRC developed the Technical and Regulatory Web-based Guidance on Groundwater Statistics and Monitoring Compliance (GSMC-1, 2013, http://www.itrcweb.org/gsmc-1/) and this associated training specifically for environmental project managers who review or use statistical calculations for reports, who make recommendations or decisions based on statistics, or who need to demonstrate compliance for groundwater projects. The training class will encourage and support project managers and others who are not statisticians to:

ITRC's Technical and Regulatory Web-based Guidance on Groundwater Statistics and Monitoring Compliance (GSMC-1, 2013) and this associated training bring clarity to the planning, implementation, and communication of groundwater statistical methods and should lead to greater confidence and transparency in the use of groundwater statistics for site management.

Soil Sampling and Decision Making Using Incremental Sampling Methodology - Part 1

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council When sampling soil at potentially contaminated sites, the goal is collecting representative samples which will lead to quality decisions. Unfortunately traditional soil sampling methods don't always provide the accurate, reproducible, and defensible data needed. Incremental Sampling Methodology (ISM) can help with this soil sampling challenge. ISM is a structured composite sampling and processing protocol that reduces data variability and provides a reasonable estimate of a chemical's mean concentration for the volume of soil being sampled. The three key components of ISM are systematic planning, field sample collection, and laboratory processing and analysis. The adequacy of ISM sample support (sample mass) reduces sampling and laboratory errors, and the ISM strategy improves the reliability and defensibility of sampling data by reducing data variability.

ISM provides representative samples of specific soil volumes defined as Decision Units. An ISM replicate sample is established by collecting numerous increments of soil (typically 30 to 100 increments) that are combined, processed, and subsampled according to specific protocols. ISM is increasingly being used for sampling soils at hazardous waste sites and on suspected contaminated lands. Proponents have found that the coverage afforded by collecting many increments, together with disciplined processing and subsampling of the combined increments, yields consistent and reproducible results that in most instances have been preferable to the results obtained by more traditional (e.g. discrete) sampling approaches.

This 2-part training course along with ITRC's web-based Incremental Sampling Methodology Technical and Regulatory Guidance Document (ISM-1, 2012) is intended to assist regulators and practitioners with the understanding the fundamental concepts of soil/contaminant heterogeneity, representative sampling, sampling/laboratory error and how ISM addresses these concepts. Through this training course you should learn:

  • basic principles to improve soil sampling results
  • systematic planning steps important to ISM
  • how to determine ISM Decision Units (DU)
  • the answers to common questions about ISM sampling design and data analysis
  • methods to collect and analyze ISM soil samples
  • the impact of laboratory processing on soil samples
  • how to evaluate ISM data and make decisions

In addition this ISM training and guidance provides insight on when and how to apply ISM at a contaminated site, and will aid in developing or reviewing project documents incorporating ISM (e.g., work plans, sampling plans, reports). You will also be provided with links to additional resources related to ISM.

The intended users of this guidance and training course are state and federal regulators, project managers, and consultant personnel responsible for and/or directly involved in developing, identifying or applying soil and sediment sampling approaches and establishing sampling objectives and methods. In addition, data end users and decision makers will gain insight to the use and impacts of ISM for soil sampling for potentially contaminated sites.

Recommended Reading: We encourage participants to review the ITRC ISM document(http://www.itrcweb.org/ISM-1/) prior to participating in the training classes. If your time is limited in reviewing the document in advance, we suggest you prioritize your time by reading the Executive Summary, Chapter 4 "Statistical Sampling Designs for ISM," and Chapter 7 "Making Decisions Using ISM Data" to maximize your learning experience during the upcoming training classes.

Biochemical Reactors for Treating Mining Influenced Water

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Mining influenced water (MIW) includes aqueous wastes generated by ore extraction and processing, as well as mine drainage and tailings runoff. MIW handling, storage, and disposal is a major environmental problem in mining districts throughout the U.S and around the world. Biochemical reactors (BCRs) are engineered treatment systems that use an organic substrate to drive microbial and chemical reactions to reduce concentrations of metals, acidity, and sulfate in MIWs. The ITRC Biochemical Reactors for Mining-Influenced Water technology guidance (BCR-1, 2013) and this associated Internet-based training provide an in-depth examination of BCRs; a decision framework to assess the applicability of BCRs; details on testing, designing, constructing and monitoring BCRs; and real world BCR case studies with diverse site conditions and chemical mixtures. At the end of this training, you should be able to complete the following activities:
  • Describe a BCR and how it works
  • Identify when a BCR is applicable to a site
  • Use the ITRC guidance for decision making by applying the decision framework
  • Improve site decision making through understanding of BCR advantages, limitations, reasonable expectations, regulatory and other challenges
  • Navigate the ITRC Biochemical Reactors for Mining-Influenced Water technology guidance (BCR-1, 2013)

For reference during the training class, participants should have a copy of Figure 2-1, decision flow process for determining the applicability of a biochemical reactor. It is also available as a 1-page PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/BCR/ITRC-BCRforMIW-DecisionFlow.pdf.

Participants should also be familiar with the ITRC technology and regulatory guidance for Mining-Waste Treatment Technology Selection (MW-1, 2010) and associated Internet-based training that helps regulators, consultants, industry, and stakeholders in selecting an applicable technology, or suite of technologies, which can be used to remediate mining sites.

Environmental Molecular Diagnostics: New Tools for Better Decisions

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Environmental molecular diagnostics (EMDs) are a group of advanced and emerging analytical techniques used to analyze biological and chemical characteristics of environmental samples. Conventional data (e.g., hydrogeological data, chemical, and geochemical analyses) often provide only indirect data regarding the mechanisms and rates of key attenuation or treatment processes. EMDs can complement these data by providing direct measurements of the organisms, genes or enzymes involved in contaminant biodegradation, of the relative contributions of abiotic and biotic processes, and of the relative rates of various degradation processes. The information provided by EMDs can improve estimates of attenuation rates and capacities and improve remedy performance assessments and optimization efforts. Improved understanding of the biological and non-biological degradation processes also can lead to greater confidence in MNA or closure decisions. EMDs have application in each phase of environmental site management (including site characterization, remediation, monitoring, and closure activities), address a wide variety of contaminants (including PCE, PCBs, radionuclides, perchlorate, fuels), and work with various media (including groundwater, soil, sediments, soil vapor).

Although EMDs have been used over the past 25 years in various scientific fields, particularly medical research and diagnostic fields, their application to environmental remediation management is relatively new and rapidly developing. The ITRC Environmental Molecular Diagnostics Fact Sheets (EMD-1, 2011), ITRC Environmental Molecular Diagnostics Technical and Regulatory Guidance (EMD-2, 2013) and this companion Internet-based training will foster the appropriate uses of EMDs and help regulators, consultants, site owners, and other stakeholders to better understand a site and to make decisions based on the results of EMD analyses. At the conclusion of the training, learners will be able to determine when and how to use the ITRC Environmental Molecular Diagnostics Technical and Regulatory Guidance (EMD-2, 2013); define when EMDs can cost-effectively augment traditional remediation data sets; and describe the utility of various types of EMDs during remediation activities.

Training participants are encouraged to review the ITRC EMD Fact Sheets, in particular the Introduction to EMDs fact sheet, before the Internet-based training.

Biofuels: Release Prevention, Environmental Behavior, and Remediation

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Biofuels and biofuel blends are a new category of transportation fuels and are defined as liquid fuels and blending components produced from renewable biomass feedstocks used as alternative or supplemental fuels for internal combustion engines. Their manufacture and consumption are increasing, in part, due to usage mandates and incentives both in the United States and abroad. This expanded use of biofuel and biofuel blends increases the potential frequency of releases due to increased manufacture, transportation, storage, and distribution. Because biofuels differ from conventional fuels with respect to their physical, chemical, and biological properties, their introduction poses challenges with respect to understanding the potential impacts of releases to the environment. Specifically, once released into the environment, these fuels will exhibit different environmental behaviors as compared to conventional fuels.

This training, which is based on the ITRC's Biofuels: Release Prevention, Environmental Behavior, and Remediation (Biofuels-1, 2011), focuses on the differences between biofuels and conventional fuels specific to release scenarios, environmental impacts, characterization, and remediation. The trainers will define the scope of the potential environmental challenges by introducing biofuel fundamentals, regulatory status, and future usage projections. Participants will learn how and when to use the ITRC biofuels guidance document for their projects. They will understand the differences in biofuel and petroleum behavior; become familiar with the biofuel supply chain, potential release scenarios and release prevention; be able to develop an appropriate conceptual model for the investigation and remediation of biofuels; and select appropriate investigation and remediation strategies.
The Training Exchange (Trainex)

The Training Exchange website (Trainex) is designed to provide a wide range of training information to EPA, other federal agency, state, tribal, and local staff involved in hazardous waste management and remediation. Trainex focuses on free training directed to federal and state staff. This site includes training schedules for deliveries of many courses, both classroom and Internet-based.

EPA works in partnership with organizations, such as the Interstate Technology Regulatory Council (ITRC), and other agencies, such as the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), to offer training relevant to hazardous waste remediation, site characterization, risk assessment, emergency response, site/incident management, counter-terrorism, and the community's role in site management and cleanup.

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