U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

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CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatITRC Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fun...

Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatFRTR Presents...Evolution of Subsur...

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Superfund Task Force - Adaptive Management Pilot Criteria Document Review for Stakeholders

A memorandum entitled "Superfund Task Force Recommendation #3: Broaden the Use of Adaptive Management" was completed by EPA on July 3rd, 2018 which provided Superfund's working definition of Adaptive Management and outlined an implementation plan to expand Adaptive Management’s use at Superfund sites. Per the implementation plan, EPA is in the process of seeking input on the pilot criteria with separate input from EPA, States/Tribes, and other stakeholders. This webinar is to provide stakeholders an overview of the Task Force Adaptive Management Implementation Plan and pilot criteria to support their review of the pilot criteria out for comment.

Borehole Geophysics Applied to Bedrock Hydrogeologic Evaluations

This presentation introduces the viewer to borehole geophysical tools commonly used in hydrogeologic investigations. These tools include gamma, temperature, conductivity, caliper, borehole video, acoustic and optical televiewers, heat-pulse flowmeter, and borehole deviation.. Examples and case studies follow illustrating the usefulness of data obtained through the utilization of these tools, especially when used to design packer tests and multi-level discrete-zone sampling strings. In addition, borehole tools commonly used in shallow oil/gas well abandonment are presented.

Chlorinated Solvent Bioremediation: Fundamentals and Practical Application for Remedial Project Managers

This webinar is a result of Recommendation 9 of EPA's Superfund Task Force, which encourages the Superfund program to "utilize state-of-the-art technologies to expedite cleanup." Actions under this recommendation include expanding the use of new remediation technologies and approaches to address contaminated sites.
https://www.epa.gov/superfund/superfund-task-force-public-participation-opportunities#webinar

Anaerobic reductive dechlorination (ARD) can be used to cost-effectively remediate chlorinated solvent sites. In ARD, microbial communities use substrates to sequentially degrade chlorinated solvents such as trichlorethylene (TCE). Depending on conditions at a site, remediation may involve adding substrates (biostimulation) and/or dechlorinating organisms (bioaugmentation). This presentation will discuss the biological and chemical principles of this technology and is geared toward remedial project managers. Key considerations for site specific application will be covered. In addition, case studies will provide examples of data from sites displaying ARD as well as sites with poor performance or insufficient data.

FRTR Presents...Evolution of Subsurface Remediation: Lessons Learned from Technical Challenges to Achieving Cleanup Goals - Part 1

This is a two-part webinar series featuring presentations delivered at the Spring 2018 FRTR Meeting. The meeting’s goals were to identify and discuss case studies where remediation technologies were successful for a variety of soil and groundwater systems; and to share experiences and lessons learned that contributed to the operation of these successful remediation technologies.

  • Navy’s Portfolio Optimization: In Situ Remediation Sites
  • EPA’s Superfund Optimization Progress Report (2011 – 2015) - Lessons Learned
  • Twenty Years of Multi-Agency Optimization Studies: History, Lessons, & Trends

FRTR Presents...Evolution of Subsurface Remediation: Lessons Learned from Technical Challenges to Achieving Cleanup Goals - Part 2

This is a two-part webinar series featuring presentations delivered at the Spring 2018 FRTR Meeting. The meeting’s goals were to identify and discuss case studies where remediation technologies were successful for a variety of soil and groundwater systems; and to share experiences and lessons learned that contributed to the operation of these successful remediation technologies.

  • Lessons Learned from the Desktop Optimization Effort for FUDS and the Army
  • Lessons Learned Applying Multiple Remediation Technologies at Air Force Plant 4
  • DOE-EM Soil and Water Assistance Team: Technical Support to Complex Sites

NARPM Presents...Stress and Environmental Contamination: Tips and Tools from ATSDR

Environmental contamination can disrupt life as usual. Community members may feel stress for several reasons, including health and financial concerns. Join this webinar to learn more about stress, how it can affect health, and why environmental contamination can cause it. We’ll offer practical tips and tools for acknowledging stress with community members and helping them cope. The webinar will wrap up with suggestions for dealing with stress you may feel as a professional working with communities affected by environmental contamination.

Attendees may be interested in Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) stress-focused fact sheets and materials. Please see:

Superfund Research Program Progress in Research Webinar Part 4: Boston University, Texas A&M University, and University of California, Davis

This Superfund Research Program (SRP) Progress in Research webinar series highlights promising research from SRP Centers awarded grants in 2017. In this session, awardees Boston University, Texas A&M University, and University of California, Davis, will describe their research projects, accomplishments, and next steps.

The Boston University SRP Center explores the long-term impacts of early life exposure to Superfund chemicals in humans and wildlife. Their work focuses on contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyls and tetrachloroethylene found in and around the New Bedford Harbor Superfund site and in drinking water of nearby communities.

The Texas A&M University SRP Center focuses on developing comprehensive tools and models for addressing exposure to mixtures during emergency-related environmental contamination events. The researchers are evaluating the complexities of hazardous chemical exposures, potential adverse health impacts, and potential hazards of exposures to complex mixtures through projects that derive from a case study utilizing the Texas Galveston Bay area.

The University of California, Davis SRP Center uses integrated chromatographic, biosensor, and cell-based technologies to detect and identify contaminants and develop innovative approaches for bioremediation. The Center is expanding the use of transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and integrated bioinformatics technologies to discover new mechanisms of action of hazardous materials and biological markers for their action and to connect hazardous substance exposures to organism level effects.

Military Munitions Support Services - Accident Reporting

A mishap, as defined by EM 385-1-1, Safety and Health Requirements Manual-USACE-ARMY is any unplanned, undesired event that occurs during the course of work being performed. This includes, accidents, incidents and near misses. Reporting requirements and timelines are specific to the type of incident and are often confused by safety personnel. The result is that many times the required timelines are not met. These procedures, associated timelines and reporting documents will be discussed in this webinar. In addition, the location of reporting forms and several specific examples will be discussed.
Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Sites contaminated with dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) and DNAPL mixtures present significant environmental challenges. Despite the decades spent on characterizing and attempting to remediate DNAPL sites, substantial risk remains. Inadequate characterization of site geology as well as the distribution, characteristics, and behavior of contaminants -- by relying on traditional monitoring well methods rather than more innovative and integrated approaches -- has limited the success of many remediation efforts.

The Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization Team has synthesized the knowledge about DNAPL site characterization and remediation acquired over the past several decades, and has integrated that information into a new document, Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization and Tools Selection (ISC-1, 2015). This guidance is a resource to inform regulators, responsible parties, other problem holders, consultants, community stakeholders, and other interested parties of the critical concepts related to characterization approaches and tools for collecting subsurface data at DNAPL sites. After this associated training, participants will be able to use the ITRC Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization and Tools Selection (ISC-1, 2015) guidance to develop and support an integrated approach to DNAPL site characterization, including:
  • Identify what site conditions must be considered when developing an informative DNAPL conceptual site model (CSM)
  • Define an objectives-based DNAPL characterization strategy
  • Understand what tools and resources are available to improve the identification, collection, and evaluation of appropriate site characterization data
  • Navigate the DNAPL characterization tools table and select appropriate technologies to fill site-specific data gaps
For reference during the training class, participants should have a copy of Figure 4-1, the integrated site characterization flow diagram from the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance document: Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization and Tools Selection (ISC-1, 2015) and available as a PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/IDSC/ITRC-ISC-Figures.pdf
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Connecting the Science to Managing LNAPL Sites a 3 Part Series

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Connecting the Science to Managing LNAPL Sites – 3-Part Series

The newly updated LNAPLs (Light Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids) 3-part training course series is based on the ITRC guidance: LNAPL Site Management: LCSM Evolution, Decision Process, and Remedial Technologies (LNAPL-3, 2018) and focuses on connecting the science to managing LNAPL sites and helping you:
  • Build upon your Understanding of LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface (Part 1)
  • Develop your LNAPL Conceptual Site Model and LNAPL Remedial Goals (Part 2)
  • Select/Implement LNAPL Technologies (Part 3)
After this training series, the expectation is that you will have the skills and understanding to use ITRC science-based resources to improve decision making at your LNAPL sites. For regulators and other government agency staff, this improved understanding can hopefully be incorporated into your own LNAPL programs.

It is recommended that participants have a general understanding of hydrogeology and some familiarity with petroleum contaminated sites. The courses will build on your existing LNAPL knowledge and outline the framework for making LNAPL remediation and management decisions. It is expected that participants will attend this 3-part training series in sequence.

LNAPL Training Part 1: Understanding LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface
Part 1 teaches how LNAPLs behave in the subsurface and examines what controls their behavior. Part 1:
  • Explains what LNAPL data can tell you about the LNAPL and site conditions
  • Covers how that information is applied to the development of an LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM) (Part 2) and LNAPL technology selection (Part 3)
Relevant and practical examples are used to illustrate key concepts.

LNAPL Training Part 2: LNAPL Conceptual Site Models and the LNAPL Decision Process
Part 2 teaches participants how to develop an LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM) and the overall framework for making LNAPL remediation and management decisions. Part 2:
  • Discusses key LNAPL and site data
  • Explains when and why those data may be important
  • Covers how to effectively organize the data into an LCSM
Part 2 also discusses how to address LNAPL concerns by selecting appropriate goals and objectives, choosing applicable technologies, and assigning remedial performance metrics and endpoints.

LNAPL Training Part 3: Using LNAPL Science, the LCSM, and LNAPL Goals to Select an LNAPL Remedial Technology
Part 3 of the training teaches the importance of informed remedial technology selection and appropriate technology application. Part 3:
  • Discusses remedial technology groups
  • Introduces specific and new remedial technologies
  • Reviews the technology selection process, how technologies can be combined to accelerate cleanup, and how the LCSM informs selection
A case study and examples demonstrate the use of these tools for remedial technology selection, implementation, and demonstration of successful remediation.
Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, LNAPL Site Management: LCSM Evolution, Decision Process, and Remedial Technologies (LNAPL-3, 2018), prior to attending the class.

Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Chemical contaminants in soil and groundwater can volatilize into soil gas and migrate through unsaturated soils of the vadose zone. Vapor intrusion (VI) occurs when these vapors migrate upward into overlying buildings through cracks and gaps in the building floors, foundations, and utility conduits, and contaminate indoor air. If present at sufficiently high concentrations, these vapors may present a threat to the health and safety of building occupants. Petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) is a subset of VI and is the process by which volatile petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) released as vapors from light nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPL), petroleum-contaminated soils, or petroleum-contaminated groundwater migrate through the vadose zone and into overlying buildings. Fortunately, in the case of PHC vapors, this migration is often limited by microorganisms that are normally present in soil. The organisms consume these chemicals, reducing them to nontoxic end products through the process of biodegradation. The extent and rate to which this natural biodegradation process occurs is strongly influenced by the concentration of the vapor source, the distance the vapors must travel through soil from the source to potential receptors, and the presence of oxygen (O2) in the subsurface environment between the source and potential receptors.

The ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance Web-Based Document, Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management (PVI-1, 2014) and this associated Internet-based training provides regulators and practitioners with consensus information based on empirical data and recent research to support PVI decision making under different regulatory frameworks. The PVI assessment strategy described in this guidance document enables confident decision making that protects human health for various types of petroleum sites and multiple PHC compounds. This guidance provides a comprehensive methodology for screening, investigating, and managing potential PVI sites and is intended to promote the efficient use of resources and increase confidence in decision making when evaluating the potential for vapor intrusion at petroleum-contaminated sites. By using the ITRC guidance document, the vapor intrusion pathway can be eliminated from further investigation at many sites where soil or groundwater is contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons or where LNAPL is present.

After attending this ITRC Internet-based training, participants should be able to:
  • Determine when and how to use the ITRC PVI document at their sites
  • Describe the important role of biodegradation impacts on the PVI pathway (in contrast to chlorinated solvent contaminated sites)
  • Value a PVI conceptual site model (CSM) and list its key components
  • Apply the ITRC PVI 8 step decision process to screen sites for the PVI pathway and determine actions to take if a site does not initially screen out, (e.g., site investigation, modeling, and vapor control and site management)
  • Access fact sheets to support community engagement activities at each step in the process
For reference during the training class, participants should have a copy of the flowcharts, Figures 1-2, 3-2, and 4-1 from the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance Web-Based Document, Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management (PVI-1, 2014) and are available as a 3-page PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/PVI/ITRC-PVI-FlowCharts.pdf


ITRC also offers a 2-day PVI focused classroom training at locations across the US. The classroom training provides participants the opportunity to learn more in-depth information about the PVI pathway and practice applying the ITRC PVI guidance document with a diverse group of environmental professionals. Learn more at the ITRC PVI classroom training page.

Remediation Management of Complex Sites

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council At some sites, complex site-specific conditions make it difficult to fully remediate environmental contamination. Both technical and nontechnical challenges can impede remediation and may prevent a site from achieving federal- and state-mandated regulatory cleanup goals within a reasonable time frame. For example, technical challenges may include geologic, hydrogeologic, geochemical, and contaminant-related conditions as well as large-scale or surface conditions. In addition, nontechnical challenges may also play a role such as managing changes that occur over long time frames, overlapping regulatory and financial responsibilities between agencies, setting achievable site objectives, maintaining effective institutional controls, redevelopment and changes in land use, and funding considerations.
This training course and associated ITRC guidance: Remediation Management of Complex Sites (RMCS-1, 2017), provide a recommended holistic process for management of challenging sites, termed “adaptive site management.” This process is a comprehensive, flexible, and iterative process that is well-suited for sites where there is significant uncertainty in remedy performance predictions. Adaptive site management includes the establishment of interim objectives and long-term site objectives that consider both technical and nontechnical challenges. Periodic adjustment of the remedial approach may involve multiple technologies at any one time and changes in technologies over time. Comprehensive planning and scheduled evaluations of remedy performance help decision makers track remedy progress and improve the timeliness of remedy optimization, reevaluations, or transition to other technologies/contingency actions.
By participating in this training course we expect you will learn to apply the ITRC guidance document to:
  • Identify and integrate technical and nontechnical challenges into a holistic approach to remediation
  • Use the Remediation Potential Assessment to identify whether adaptive site management is warranted due to site complexity
  • Understand and apply adaptive site management principles
  • Develop a long-term performance-based action plan
  • Apply well-demonstrated techniques for effective stakeholder engagement
  • Access additional resources, tools, and case studies most relevant for complex sites
  • Communicate the value of the guidance to regulators, practitioners, community members, and others
Ultimately, using the guidance that can lead to better decision making and remediation management at complex sites. The guidance is intended to benefit a variety of site decision makers, including regulators, responsible parties and their consultants, and public and tribal stakeholders.
Case studies are used to describe real-world applications of remediation and remediation management at complex sites. Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance Remediation Management of Complex Sites (RMCS-1, 2017) prior to attending the class.

Issues and Options in Human Health Risk Assessment - A Resource When Alternatives to Default Parameters and Scenarios are Proposed

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Many state and local regulatory agencies responsible for the cleanup of chemicals released to the environment have adopted regulations, guidance and policies that define default approaches, scenarios, and parameters as a starting point for risk assessment and the development of risk-based screening values. Regulatory project managers and decision makers, however, may not have specific guidance when alternative approaches, scenarios, and parameters are proposed for site-specific risk assessments, and are faced with difficult technical issues when evaluating these site-specific risk assessments. This ITRC web-based document is a resource for project managers and decision makers to help evaluate alternatives to risk assessment default approaches, scenarios and parameters.

ITRC's Decision Making at Contaminated Sites: Issues and Options in Human Health Risk Assessment (RISK-3, 2015) guidance document is different from existing ITRC Risk Assessment guidance and other state and federal resources because it identifies commonly encountered issues and discusses options in risk assessment when applying site-specific alternatives to defaults. In addition, the document includes links to resources and tools that provide even more detailed information on the specific issues and potential options. The ITRC Risk Assessment Team believes that state regulatory agencies and other organizations can use the RISK-3 document as a resource or reference to supplement their existing guidance. Community members and other stakeholders also may find this document helpful in understanding and using risk assessment information.

After participating in this ITRC training course, the learner will be able to apply ITRC's Decision Making at Contaminated Sites: Issues and Options in Human Health Risk (RISK-3, 2015) document when developing or reviewing site-specific risk assessments by:
  • Identifying common issues encountered when alternatives to default parameters and scenarios are proposed during the planning, data evaluation, toxicity, exposure assessment, and risk characterization and providing possible options for addressing these issues
  • Recognizing the value of proper planning and the role of stakeholders in the development and review of risk assessments
  • Providing information (that includes links to additional resources and tools) to support decision making when alternatives to default approaches, scenarios and parameters are proposed
ITRC offers additional documents and training on risk management. ITRC's Use of Risk Assessment in Management of Contaminated Sites (RISK-2, 2008) and associated Internet-based training archive highlight variation of risk-based site management and describes how to improve the use of risk assessment for making better risk management decisions. ITRC's Examination of Risk-Based Screening Values and Approaches of Selected States (RISK-1, 2005) and associated Internet-based training archive focus on the process by which risk-based levels are derived in different states.