U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

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CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
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Combined Analytical Services Contract (CASC) Pre-Solicitation Webinar

The US EPA Analytical Services Branch (ASB) and Office of Acquisition Solutions (OAS) will present their upcoming Combined Analytical Services Contract (CASC) procurement to industry. The session will be 90 minutes including a 60 minute presentation and 30 minutes for questions and answers. ASB and OAS presenters will highlight important information to review and consider prior to the release of the Request for Proposal (RFP). The RFP will include both Inorganic and Organic Methods (SuperFund Analytical Methods or SFAM) and High Resolution Superfund Methods (HRSM) Statements of Work (SOWs). A written Q&A will be available following the event. All interested laboratories are strongly encouraged to participate. Please note: this will be the only webinar prior to the release of the RFP.

The upcoming analytical services' Statements of Work (SOWs) are available at:
https://www.epa.gov/clp/upcoming-analytical-services


This event has a target audience of environmental testing laboratories registered under NAICS code 541380-Testing laboratories.

Biogeochemical Interactions Affecting Bioavailability for in Situ Remediation: Session II - Bioavailability of Mixtures of PAHs, Chlorinated Compounds, and Metals

This webinar series will feature individual research projects funded by the NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP). In 2013, the SRP initiated a targeted research program to better understand how contaminants in the environment are affected by complex biological, geological, and chemical processes. By understanding these complex interactions, we are better equipped to optimize remediation strategies and, therefore, improve science-based decision making for site management, priority-setting, and remedy selection. The individual research project grants support problem-solving research on the mechanisms of biogeochemical interactions that may impact remediation of contaminated soil, sediment, surface water, or groundwater.

In session 2, we will hear from SRP-funded individual research projects at Virginia Institute of Marine Science, University of California, Riverside, and Colorado School of Mines.

Researchers led by Michael Unger, Ph.D., and Aaron Beck, Ph.D., at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) are developing new analytical techniques to help evaluate and quantify the mechanisms controlling the transport and the bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) at contaminated sediment sites. They have employed an antibody-based biosensor developed at VIMS that allowed rapid evaluation of the mechanisms controlling PAH transport at contaminated sediment sites saving effort and costs over traditional GC-MS based methods. Biosensor measured PAH in porewater was highly correlated to GC-MS analysis in split samples and was also correlated to benthic amphipod toxicity in laboratory tests. PAH concentrations in porewater samples were better predictors of toxicity than whole sediment PAH concentrations currently used for regulatory evaluation of remediation effectiveness. Future remediation plans at contaminated sediment sites that involve sediment removal and/or capping will need to address controlling the PAH flux to the aqueous phase. These new technologies allow this assessment to be accomplished more rapidly and economically than traditional methods. The technology has also been adapted for the rapid quantification of PAH concentrations in oysters and soils and is being developed as a potential tool for quick response during flood or oil spill events. For more information, please visit: Impact of Groundwater-Surface Water Dynamics on in situ Remediation Efficacy and Bioavailability of NAPL Contaminants

Jay Gan, Ph.D., and Daniel Schlenk, Ph.D., lead a project at the University of California, Riverside to develop a simple method for measuring and accounting for contaminant aging in risk assessments and remediation. They will apply the method to sediment samples collected from various depths (reflecting deposition at different historical times) and location (reflecting different sediment properties) at the Palos Verdes Shelf Superfund site off the Los Angeles coast. Sediments at this site contain high levels (up to 200 mg/kg) of DDTs and PCBs deposited from as far back as 60 years ago. For more information, please visit: Exploring the Importance of Aging in Contaminant Bioavailability and Remediation

Researchers led by James Ranville, Ph.D., at the Colorado School of Mines are developing and refining techniques - including environmental molecular diagnostics and stable isotope assays - used to detect, assess, and evaluate the bioavailability of metals that occur in mixtures and can be taken up by aquatic organisms, including nickel, zinc, copper and cadmium. They have tested these approaches in a metals-contaminated stream at the North Fork Clear Creek Superfund site in central Colorado. Stream remediation began in 2017 by lime-treatment of the major mining inputs. This project will improve knowledge on the risks posed by mixtures of contaminant metals and assist in evaluating remediation effectiveness. For more information, please visit: Investigating Biogeochemical Controls on Metal Mixture Toxicity Using Stable Isotopes and Gene Expressions

Biogeochemical Interactions Affecting Bioavailability for in Situ Remediation: Session III - Mercury Bioremediation and Biotransformation Under Varying Biogeochemical Conditions

This webinar series will feature individual research projects funded by the NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP). In 2013, the SRP initiated a targeted research program to better understand how contaminants in the environment are affected by complex biological, geological, and chemical processes. By understanding these complex interactions, we are better equipped to optimize remediation strategies and, therefore, improve science-based decision making for site management, priority-setting, and remedy selection. The individual research project grants support problem-solving research on the mechanisms of biogeochemical interactions that may impact remediation of contaminated soil, sediment, surface water, or groundwater.



In session 3, we will hear from SRP-funded individual research projects at Duke University and University of Maryland-Baltimore County.



At Duke University, scientists led by Heileen Hsu-Kim, Ph.D., are studying sediment dwelling microorganisms that methylate mercury, and identifying factors that may be used to control and reduce toxic methylmercury production. The research is focusing on strategies to measure mercury bioavailability and biomethylation potential in sediments. Their work has demonstrated that passive samplers such as diffusive gradient in thin-films (DGT) can be used to predict the bioavailable fraction of mercury to methylating organisms. The work also evaluated biomolecular techniques targeting microbes carrying the hgcA and hgcB genes specific for mercury methylation. Together, these methods can be used to determine mercury biomethylation potential in sediments and help site managers understand the controlling factors leading to methylmercury risk at field sites. For more information, please visit: Biogeochemical Framework to Evaluate Mercury Methylation Potential During in-situ Remediation of Contaminated Sediments



At the University of Maryland Baltimore County, Upal Ghosh, Ph.D., leads a research team to develop an empirical model of the factors influencing mercury and methylmercury bioavailability in contaminated areas. Using this model, they plan to identify biogeochemical characteristics that make sites suitable for remediation with sorbent remediation approaches, such as activated carbon amendments. The researchers will also design sorbent amendment/thin capping strategies that reduce methylmercury bioavailability. The main study site is a salt marsh in Berry's Creek, N.J., where they are conducting a field trial of in situ sorbent remediation using activated carbon and also evaluating the relative efficacy of a wider range of black carbons. For more information, please visit: Development of in-situ Mercury Remediation Approaches Based on Methylmercury Bioavailability
Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soil: Considerations for Human Health Risk Assessment

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Risk-based cleanup goals are often calculated assuming that chemicals present in soil are absorbed by humans as efficiently as the chemicals dosed during the toxicity tests used to determine regulatory toxicity values (such as the Reference Dose or Cancer Slope Factor). This assumption can result in inaccurate exposure estimates and associated risks for some contaminated sites because the amount of a chemical absorbed (the chemical?s bioavailability) from contaminated soil can be a fraction of the total amount present. Properly accounting for soil-chemical interactions on the bioavailability of chemicals from soil can lead to more accurate estimates of exposures to soil contaminants and improve risk assessments by decreasing uncertainty.
The basis for this training course is the ITRC guidance: Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soil: Considerations for Human Health Risk Assessment (BCS-1). This guidance describes the general concepts of the bioavailability of contaminants in soil, reviews the state of the science, and discusses how to incorporate bioavailability into the human health risk assessment process. This guidance addresses lead, arsenic, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) because evaluating bioavailability is better understood for these chemicals than for others, particularly for the incidental ingestion of soil.
The target audience for this guidance and training course are:
  • Project managers interested in decreasing uncertainty in the risk assessment which may lead to reduced remedial action costs.
  • Risk assessors new to bioavailability or those who want additional confidence and training in the current methods and common practices for using bioavailability assessment to more accurately determine human health risk at a contaminated site.
As a participant in this training you should learn to:
  • Value the ITRC document as a ?go-to? resource for soil bioavailability
  • Apply the decision process to determine when a site-specific bioavailability assessment may be appropriate
  • Use the ITRC Review Checklist to develop or review a risk assessment that includes soil bioavailability
  • Consider factors that affect arsenic, lead and PAH bioavailability
  • Select appropriate methods to evaluate soil bioavailability
  • Use tools to develop site-specific soil bioavailability estimates and incorporate them into human health risk assessment
Learners can envision themselves implementing the ITRC guidance through case study applications. Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soil: Considerations for Human Health Risk Assessment (BCS-1) prior to attending the class.

Connecting the Science to Managing LNAPL Sites a 3 Part Series

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Connecting the Science to Managing LNAPL Sites - 3-Part Series

The newly updated LNAPLs (Light Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids) 3-part training course series is based on the ITRC guidance: LNAPL Site Management: LCSM Evolution, Decision Process, and Remedial Technologies (LNAPL-3, 2018) and focuses on connecting the science to managing LNAPL sites and helping you:
  • Build upon your Understanding of LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface (Part 1)
  • Develop your LNAPL Conceptual Site Model and LNAPL Remedial Goals (Part 2)
  • Select/Implement LNAPL Technologies (Part 3)
After this training series, the expectation is that you will have the skills and understanding to use ITRC science-based resources to improve decision making at your LNAPL sites. For regulators and other government agency staff, this improved understanding can hopefully be incorporated into your own LNAPL programs.

It is recommended that participants have a general understanding of hydrogeology and some familiarity with petroleum contaminated sites. The courses will build on your existing LNAPL knowledge and outline the framework for making LNAPL remediation and management decisions. It is expected that participants will attend this 3-part training series in sequence.

LNAPL Training Part 1: Understanding LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface
Part 1 teaches how LNAPLs behave in the subsurface and examines what controls their behavior. Part 1:
  • Explains what LNAPL data can tell you about the LNAPL and site conditions
  • Covers how that information is applied to the development of an LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM) (Part 2) and LNAPL technology selection (Part 3)
Relevant and practical examples are used to illustrate key concepts.

LNAPL Training Part 2: LNAPL Conceptual Site Models and the LNAPL Decision Process
Part 2 teaches participants how to develop an LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM) and the overall framework for making LNAPL remediation and management decisions. Part 2:
  • Discusses key LNAPL and site data
  • Explains when and why those data may be important
  • Covers how to effectively organize the data into an LCSM
Part 2 also discusses how to address LNAPL concerns by selecting appropriate goals and objectives, choosing applicable technologies, and assigning remedial performance metrics and endpoints.

LNAPL Training Part 3: Using LNAPL Science, the LCSM, and LNAPL Goals to Select an LNAPL Remedial Technology
Part 3 of the training teaches the importance of informed remedial technology selection and appropriate technology application. Part 3:
  • Discusses remedial technology groups
  • Introduces specific and new remedial technologies
  • Reviews the technology selection process, how technologies can be combined to accelerate cleanup, and how the LCSM informs selection
A case study and examples demonstrate the use of these tools for remedial technology selection, implementation, and demonstration of successful remediation.
Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, LNAPL Site Management: LCSM Evolution, Decision Process, and Remedial Technologies (LNAPL-3, 2018), prior to attending the class.

TPH Risk Evaluation at Petroleum-Contaminated Sites

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Remediation at petroleum release sites is often infeasible for technical or cost reasons. Many of these sites could be depleted in typical indicator compounds, such as BTEXN, but still heavily contaminated in terms of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH). The traditional indicator compound approach for managing petroleum contaminants may not fully identify short- and long-term potential environmental concerns, can create delays in project schedules and cost overages for sub-surface utility work or redevelopment. It is important to consider a comprehensive cumulative risk-based approach to more effectively incorporate TPH data in addition to traditional BTEXN data for cleanup and long-term management decisions.

The basis for this training course is the ITRC guidance: TPH Risk Evaluation at Petroleum-Contaminated Sites (TPHRisk-1, 2018). The guidance builds on long-standing and current research and experience, and presents the current science for evaluating TPH risk at petroleum-contaminated sites. The methods and procedures to evaluate human and ecological risk and establish cleanup requirements in the various media at petroleum release sites will assist decision makers in developing and implementing a technically defensible approach. In addition, the guidance provides information and supplemental references to assist practitioners and project managers in the assessment of fate, transport, exposure, and toxicity of TPH. The guidance users will also gain information that may be used in conjunction with classic tiered approaches for risk-based decision making (ASTM 2015b, ITRC Risk 3 2015), including modifications in the assessment and remedial-decision and regulatory framework for TPH impacts through direct comparison to screening levels, site-specific modification of screening levels, and complete site-specific risk assessment for sources, receptors, and pathways, where appropriate.

The target audience for this guidance and training course is:
  • Regulators and Program Managers interested in knowing how site management decisions can influence the TPH risk evaluation process.
  • Risk assessors new to TPH data or those who want additional knowledge and training in the current methods and common practices for collecting and using TPH data in assessments to more accurately determine human health and/or ecological risks at petroleum-contaminated sites.
  • Stakeholders who are either engaged in redevelopment at former petroleum release sites or folks who are involved in community engagement and revitalization activities.
As a participant in this training you should learn to:
  • Recognize the ITRC document as a go-to resource for evaluating TPH risk at petroleum-contaminated sites
  • Recognize how TPH -impacted media interacts with the environment and changes over time
  • Select appropriate analytic method(s) to match site objectives
  • Apply the decision framework to determine when a site-specific target level may be more appropriate than a generic screening level for TPH
Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, TPH Risk Evaluation at Petroleum-Contaminated Sites (TPHRisk-1, 2018) prior to attending the class.