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LAYING WASTE TO MERCURY: INEXPENSIVE SORBENTS MADE FROM SULFUR AND RECYCLED COOKING OILS
Worthington, M.J.H., R.L. Kucera, I.S. Albuquerque, C.T. Gibson, A. Sibley, A.D. Slattery, et al.
Chemistry: A European Journal 23(64):16219-16230(2017)

Researchers have developed low-cost Hg sorbents made solely from sulfur and unsaturated cooking oils. A porous version of the polymer was prepared by simply synthesizing the polymer in the presence of a sodium chloride porogen. The resulting material is a rubber that captures liquid Hg metal, Hg vapor, inorganic Hg bound to organic matter, and highly toxic alkylmercury compounds. Hg removal from air, water, and soil was demonstrated. Because sulfur is a by-product of petroleum refining and spent cooking oils from the food industry are suitable starting materials, these Hg-capturing polymers can be synthesized entirely from waste and supplied on multi-kilogram scales. This paper is Open Access at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/chem.201702871.



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