U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs)

Toxicology

Halogenated Alkanes

1,1,2-Trichlorotrifluoroethane

Human Health Toxicity

1,1,2-Trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane, also known as TCTFE, Freon 113, and CFC-113, had wide use as an industrial solvent, refrigerant, and feedstock in the production of other chemicals. Production of CFC-133 is now banned, and consequently, emissions are declining. Domestic use of a contaminated water supply might expose the user via ingestion, or via inhalation when the compound volatilizes from water used for cooking, bathing, or showering. Dermal contact with CFC-113 can occur when bathing or showering (Lewis 1997).

Results from tests involving human volunteers have shown that over half the inhaled dose of CFC-113 is exhaled immediately, with very little being absorbed and appearing in urine. Animal studies indicate that when exposure to CFC-113 ceases, any compound that had passed to the tissues is released into venous blood. CFC-113 does not appear to be metabolized by either humans or experimental animals (Lewis 1997).

CFC-113 is of low toxicity to humans and laboratory animals. Results from an inhalation study on human volunteers suggest that high levels of CFC-133 can cause drowsiness, loss of concentration, and dizziness; however, these effects were reported to be temporary, with resolution within 15 minutes of cessation of exposure (Lewis 1997).

A chronic toxicity study employing rats did not suggest that CFC-113 is carcinogenic; however, an increase in liver weight in male rats was reported in all groups (Lewis 1997).

The offspring of rodents exposed to CFC-113 in pregnancy did not develop abnormalities of the soft tissues or skeleton (Lewis 1997).

CFC-113 gave negative results in the Ames Salmonella genotoxicity assay, and did not show mutagenic activity in an in vivo mouse genotoxicity test (Lewis 1997).

References

Public Health Goal for 1,1,2-Trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethne in Drinking Water Adobe PDF Logo
Lewis, D.
California EPA, Office of Environmental Heath Hazard Assessment, 21 pp, 1997

For Further Information

1,1,2-Trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (CASRN 76-13-1)
U.S. EPA, Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS).

Ecological Toxicity

No data were found that describe the ecotoxicity of CFC-113.



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