U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

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CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatGreen Up Your Cleanups

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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatITRC Remedy Selection for Contamina...

Remedy Selection for Contaminated Sediments
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Leveraging Resources for Brownfields Revitalization: Meet the Funders - Economic Development

This webinar will highlight the resources for brownfields revitalization available from the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Economic Development Administration, and the United States Department of Agriculture Rural Development. It is the second in OBLR's webinar series on what communities need to know to successfully leverage resources for brownfields revitalization.

Leveraging Resources for Brownfields Revitalization: Meet the Funders - Infrastructure

This "Meet the Funders" webinar will highlight resources available from the Department of Transportation, The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the EPA Office of Water. It is the third of OBLR's webinar series focusing on what communities need to do to successfully leverage resources for brownfields revitalization.

Green Up Your Cleanups

Since its release in late 2013, use of the ASTM Standard Guide for Greener Cleanups (E2893) has expanded across cleanup programs and across the country. Recent developments suggest its use at projects will accelerate, helping all involved parties to achieve protective cleanups with lower environmental footprints. Join us on this webinar to learn of recent developments related to the Guide and how to access it at no cost for a two-month trial period. To learn more, visit Greener Cleanups on EPA's website. For the latest information relevant to the Superfund program, view EPAís August 2016 guidance memorandum (14pp/2.6MB/PDF) on consideration of greener cleanup activities in the Superfund cleanup process.

The webinar will address the following topics through speaker presentations:
  • Summary of significant recent developments, including EPA guidance, applications in the field, and recent contracts activity. Speaker: Carlos Pachon; Team Lead, Greener Cleanups; U.S. EPA, Washington DC

  • ASTM Standard Guide for Greener Cleanups: History and updates. Speaker: Kate Chalfin; Committee Staff Manager; ASTM Incorporated, West Conshohocken PA

  • Using the ASTM Standard: A primer. Speaker: Deb Goldblum; Acting Branch Chief, Federal Facilities; U.S. EPA Region 3, Philadelphia PA

  • A corporate perspective: Greening cleanups. Speaker: Russell Downey; Director of Environmental Engineering, Remediation & Transactions; Pfizer Global Engineering

  • EPA & ASTM collaboration: Limited-time, no-cost access to the ASTM Standard. Speaker: Elise Owen; Standards Executive; U.S. EPA, Washington DC

Closing discussions will summarize developments, experiences and perspectives in these topic areas and address related feedback submitted by participants during the webinar.

US Small Business Funding Opportunities (SBIR/STTR) for Environmental Technologies at NIEHS SRP, EPA, and NSF

This webinar is designed to help small businesses and academic researchers better understand the different agencies that fund environmental technologies, and the fundamental goals of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs.

The SBIR and STTR programs are one of the largest sources of funding for eligible U.S. small businesses [https://www.sbir.gov/faqs/eligibility-requirements] to develop innovative high technical risk technologies that have potential for substantial commercial or societal benefits.

The webinar is hosted jointly by the SBIR/STTR programs within the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program (NIEHS SRP), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the National Science Foundation (NSF). Hear agency experts —Heather Henry from NIEHS SRP; April Richards from EPA; and Prakash Balan from NSF — highlight the unique characteristics of each of their environmental funding options, details of their SBIR/STTR programs, and tips on how to develop a successful SBIR/STTR application. A majority of the time will be dedicated to a Q&A session at the end of the webinar.

The NIEHS SRP SBIR/STTR programs fund the development of innovative technologies for the detection and remediation of hazardous substances of relevance to Superfund.

The EPA SBIR program funds small businesses focused on technologies for the treatment of drinking water and wastewater; air quality sensors, filters, and pollution reduction; and innovative green manufacturing and green materials.

The NSF SBIR/STTR environmental programs fund any innovative technologies which have a significant, beneficial impact on the environment and enhance sustainability. Technologies include, but are not limited to, innovations in energy and bioenergy; biotechnology; separations; green chemistry-based products and byproducts; water conservation and reuse; agriculture; and chemical, food, and pharmaceutical processing.

Military Munitions Support Services - Remedial / Removal Actions

This will be a Military Munitions Support Services seminar with subject matter experts discussing Remedial / Removal Actions.
Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


Remedy Selection for Contaminated Sediments

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council The sediments underlying many of our nationís major waterways are contaminated with toxic pollutants from past industrial activities. Cleaning up contaminated sediments is expensive and technically-challenging. Sediment sites are unique, complex, and require a multidisciplinary approach and often project managers lack sediments experience. ITRC developed the technical and regulatory guidance, Remedy Selection for Contaminated Sediments (CS-2, 2014), to assist decision-makers in identifying which contaminated sediment management technology is most favorable based on an evaluation of site specific physical, sediment, contaminant, and land and waterway use characteristics. The document provides a remedial selection framework to help identify favorable technologies, and identifies additional factors (feasibility, cost, stakeholder concerns, and others) that need to be considered as part of the remedy selection process. This ITRC training course supports participants with applying the technical and regulatory guidance as a tool to overcome the remedial challenges posed by contaminated sediment sites. Participants learn how to:
  • Identify site-specific characteristics and data needed for site decision making
  • Evaluate potential technologies based on site information
  • Select the most favorable contaminant management technology for their site
For reference during the training class, participants should have a copy of Figure 2-1, Framework for Sediment Remedy Evaluation. It is available as a 1-page PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/ContSedRem/ITRC-SedimentRemedyEvaluation.pdf.

Participants should also be familiar with the ITRC technology and regulatory guidance for Incorporating Bioavailability Considerations into the Evaluation of Contaminated Sediment Sites Website (CS-1, 2011) and associated Internet-based training that assists state regulators and practitioners with understanding and incorporating fundamental concepts of bioavailability in contaminated sediment management practices.

Issues and Options in Human Health Risk Assessment - A Resource When Alternatives to Default Parameters and Scenarios are Proposed

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Many state and local regulatory agencies responsible for the cleanup of chemicals released to the environment have adopted regulations, guidance and policies that define default approaches, scenarios, and parameters as a starting point for risk assessment and the development of risk-based screening values. Regulatory project managers and decision makers, however, may not have specific guidance when alternative approaches, scenarios, and parameters are proposed for site-specific risk assessments, and are faced with difficult technical issues when evaluating these site-specific risk assessments. This ITRC web-based document is a resource for project managers and decision makers to help evaluate alternatives to risk assessment default approaches, scenarios and parameters.

ITRC's Decision Making at Contaminated Sites: Issues and Options in Human Health Risk Assessment (RISK-3, 2015) guidance document is different from existing ITRC Risk Assessment guidance and other state and federal resources because it identifies commonly encountered issues and discusses options in risk assessment when applying site-specific alternatives to defaults. In addition, the document includes links to resources and tools that provide even more detailed information on the specific issues and potential options. The ITRC Risk Assessment Team believes that state regulatory agencies and other organizations can use the RISK-3 document as a resource or reference to supplement their existing guidance. Community members and other stakeholders also may find this document helpful in understanding and using risk assessment information.

After participating in this ITRC training course, the learner will be able to apply ITRC's Decision Making at Contaminated Sites: Issues and Options in Human Health Risk (RISK-3, 2015) document when developing or reviewing site-specific risk assessments by:
  • Identifying common issues encountered when alternatives to default parameters and scenarios are proposed during the planning, data evaluation, toxicity, exposure assessment, and risk characterization and providing possible options for addressing these issues
  • Recognizing the value of proper planning and the role of stakeholders in the development and review of risk assessments
  • Providing information (that includes links to additional resources and tools) to support decision making when alternatives to default approaches, scenarios and parameters are proposed
ITRC offers additional documents and training on risk management. ITRC's Use of Risk Assessment in Management of Contaminated Sites (RISK-2, 2008) and associated Internet-based training archive highlight variation of risk-based site management and describes how to improve the use of risk assessment for making better risk management decisions. ITRC's Examination of Risk-Based Screening Values and Approaches of Selected States (RISK-1, 2005) and associated Internet-based training archive focus on the process by which risk-based levels are derived in different states.

An Improved Understanding of LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface - State of Science vs. State of Practice - Part 1

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) are organic liquids such as gasoline, diesel, and other petroleum hydrocarbon products that are immiscible with water and less dense than water. Understanding LNAPLs is important because they are present in the subsurface at thousands of remediation sites across the country, and are often the sole reason why a site remains "open." The spectrum of sites where LNAPL assessment and remediation efforts may take place include petroleum manufacturing and handling facilities such as refineries, bulk product terminals, gas stations, airports and military bases. LNAPLs in the subsurface can be a complex problem to address, and frequently prevent or delay regulatory closure (no further action) of remediation projects.

This training course is relevant for all levels of state and federal regulators, environmental consultants, and technically-inclined site owners and public stakeholders. The training course is divided into three parts:
  • An Improved Understanding of LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface - State of Science vs. State of Practice
  • LNAPL Characterization and Recoverability -- Improved Analysis
  • Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals
Part 1 explains how LNAPLs behave in the subsurface and examines what controls their behavior. Part 1 also explains what LNAPL data can tell you about the LNAPL and site conditions. Relevant and practical examples are used to illustrate key concepts. A sound LNAPL understanding is necessary to effectively characterize and assess LNAPL conditions and potential risks, as well as to evaluate potential remedial technologies or alternatives. Unfortunately, many environmental professionals have a faulty understanding of LNAPL conditions based on outdated paradigms. The ITRC LNAPLs Team is providing Internet-based training to improve the general understanding of LNAPLs. Better understanding leads to better decision making. Additionally, this training provides a necessary technical foundation to foster effective use of the ITRC LNAPLs Team Technical and Regulatory Guidance document, Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals (LNAPL-2, 2009).

LNAPL Characterization and Recoverability - Improved Analysis - Part 2

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) are organic liquids such as gasoline, diesel, and other petroleum hydrocarbon products that are immiscible with water and less dense than water. Understanding LNAPLs is important because they are present in the subsurface at thousands of remediation sites across the country, and are often the sole reason why a site remains "open." The spectrum of sites where LNAPL assessment and remediation efforts may take place include petroleum manufacturing and handling facilities such as refineries, bulk product terminals, gas stations, airports and military bases. LNAPLs in the subsurface can be a complex problem to address, and frequently prevent or delay regulatory closure (no further action) of remediation projects.

This training course is relevant for all levels of state and federal regulators, environmental consultants, and technically-inclined site owners and public stakeholders. The training course is divided into three parts:
  • An Improved Understanding of LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface - State of Science vs. State of Practice
  • LNAPL Characterization and Recoverability-- Improved Analysis
  • Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals
Part 2 addresses LNAPL characterization and site conceptual model development as well as LNAPL recovery evaluation and remedial considerations. Specifically, Part 2 discusses key LNAPL and site data, when and why those data may be important, and how to get those data. Part 2 also discusses how to evaluate LNAPL recoverability. A sound LNAPL understanding is necessary to effectively characterize and assess LNAPL conditions and potential risks, as well as to evaluate potential remedial technologies or alternatives. Unfortunately, many environmental professionals have a faulty understanding of LNAPL conditions based on outdated paradigms. The ITRC LNAPLs Team is providing Internet-based training to improve the general understanding of LNAPLs. Better understanding leads to better decision making. Additionally, this training provides a necessary technical foundation to foster effective use of the ITRC LNAPLs Team Technical and Regulatory Guidance document, Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals (LNAPL-2, 2009).

Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals - Part 3

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) are organic liquids such as gasoline, diesel, and other petroleum hydrocarbon products that are immiscible with water and less dense than water. Understanding LNAPLs is important because they are present in the subsurface at thousands of remediation sites across the country and are often the sole reason why a site remains open. The spectrum of sites where LNAPL assessment and remediation efforts may take place include petroleum manufacturing and handling facilities such as refineries, bulk product terminals, gas stations, airports and military bases. LNAPLs in the subsurface can be a complex problem to address, and frequently prevent or delay regulatory closure (no further action) of remediation projects.

Over the past few decades, LNAPL remedial technologies have evolved from conventional pumping or hydraulic recovery systems to a variety of innovative, aggressive, and experimental technologies that address the mobile and residual LNAPL fractions, as well as volatile and dissolved-phase plumes. Thus, many different LNAPL remedial technologies with differing site and LNAPL applicabilities and capabilities are available to remediate LNAPL releases. This can make selection of a remedial technology daunting and inefficient. To foster informed remedial technology selection and appropriate technology application, the LNAPLs Team developed the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance document, Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals (LNAPL-2, 2009). This document addresses seventeen LNAPL remedial technologies and provides a framework to streamline remedial technology evaluation and selection.

This training course is relevant for new and veteran regulators, environmental consultants, and technically-inclined site owners and public stakeholders. The training course is divided into three parts:
  • Part 1: An Improved Understanding of LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface - State of Science vs. State of Practice
  • Part 2: LNAPL Characterization and Recoverability - Improved Analysis
  • Part 3: Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals
Part 3 uses the LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM) approach to identify the LNAPL concerns or risks and set proper LNAPL remedial objectives and technology-specific remediation goals and performance metrics. The training course also provides an overview of the LNAPL remedial technology selection framework. The framework uses a series of tools to screen the seventeen remedial technologies based on site and LNAPL conditions and other important factors. LNAPL Training Part 1 and LNAPL Training 2 are recommended pre-requisites for this Part 3 training course. Archives are available at http://cluin.org/live/archive.cfm?sort=title#itrc (note: courses are listed alphabetically, you will have to scroll down to find the course of interest).

Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Chemical contaminants in soil and groundwater can volatilize into soil gas and migrate through unsaturated soils of the vadose zone. Vapor intrusion (VI) occurs when these vapors migrate upward into overlying buildings through cracks and gaps in the building floors, foundations, and utility conduits, and contaminate indoor air. If present at sufficiently high concentrations, these vapors may present a threat to the health and safety of building occupants. Petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) is a subset of VI and is the process by which volatile petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) released as vapors from light nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPL), petroleum-contaminated soils, or petroleum-contaminated groundwater migrate through the vadose zone and into overlying buildings. Fortunately, in the case of PHC vapors, this migration is often limited by microorganisms that are normally present in soil. The organisms consume these chemicals, reducing them to nontoxic end products through the process of biodegradation. The extent and rate to which this natural biodegradation process occurs is strongly influenced by the concentration of the vapor source, the distance the vapors must travel through soil from the source to potential receptors, and the presence of oxygen (O2) in the subsurface environment between the source and potential receptors.

The ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance Web-Based Document, Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management (PVI-1, 2014) and this associated Internet-based training provides regulators and practitioners with consensus information based on empirical data and recent research to support PVI decision making under different regulatory frameworks. The PVI assessment strategy described in this guidance document enables confident decision making that protects human health for various types of petroleum sites and multiple PHC compounds. This guidance provides a comprehensive methodology for screening, investigating, and managing potential PVI sites and is intended to promote the efficient use of resources and increase confidence in decision making when evaluating the potential for vapor intrusion at petroleum-contaminated sites. By using the ITRC guidance document, the vapor intrusion pathway can be eliminated from further investigation at many sites where soil or groundwater is contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons or where LNAPL is present.

After attending this ITRC Internet-based training, participants should be able to:
  • Determine when and how to use the ITRC PVI document at their sites
  • Describe the important role of biodegradation impacts on the PVI pathway (in contrast to chlorinated solvent contaminated sites)
  • Value a PVI conceptual site model (CSM) and list its key components
  • Apply the ITRC PVI 8 step decision process to screen sites for the PVI pathway and determine actions to take if a site does not initially screen out, (e.g., site investigation, modeling, and vapor control and site management)
  • Access fact sheets to support community engagement activities at each step in the process
For reference during the training class, participants should have a copy of the flowcharts, Figures 1-2, 3-2, and 4-1 from the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance Web-Based Document, Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management (PVI-1, 2014) and are available as a 3-page PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/PVI/ITRC-PVI-FlowCharts.pdf


ITRC also offers a 2-day PVI focused classroom training at locations across the US. The classroom training provides participants the opportunity to learn more in-depth information about the PVI pathway and practice applying the ITRC PVI guidance document with a diverse group of environmental professionals. Learn more at the ITRC PVI classroom training page.
The Training Exchange (Trainex)

The Training Exchange website (Trainex) is designed to provide a wide range of training information to EPA, other federal agency, state, tribal, and local staff involved in hazardous waste management and remediation. Trainex focuses on free training directed to federal and state staff. This site includes training schedules for deliveries of many courses, both classroom and Internet-based.

EPA works in partnership with organizations, such as the Interstate Technology Regulatory Council (ITRC), and other agencies, such as the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), to offer training relevant to hazardous waste remediation, site characterization, risk assessment, emergency response, site/incident management, counter-terrorism, and the community's role in site management and cleanup.

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