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CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatITRC Connecting the Science to Mana...

Connecting the Science to Managing LNAPL Sites a 3 Part Series - Part 1
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatDesign and Construction Issues at H...


Download seminar information in iCalendar formatDesign and Construction Issues at H...

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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatITRC TPH Risk Evaluation at Petrole...

TPH Risk Evaluation at Petroleum-Contaminated Sites
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatRisk e-Learning Webinar Series: Ses...

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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatMining Webinar Series: Assessment a...

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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatFRTR at 30 Years: Grand Challenges ...

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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatITRC Integrated DNAPL Site Characte...

Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatFRTR at 30 Years: Grand Challenges ...

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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatITRC Connecting the Science to Mana...

Connecting the Science to Managing LNAPL Sites a 3 Part Series - Part 2
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Design and Construction Issues at Hazardous Waste Sites Webinar on Successful Remedial Design, Session 1

The Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) Denver Post and Philadelphia Post along with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are hosting a series of webinars based on talks given at recent Design and Construction Issues at Hazardous Waste Sites (DCHWS) Symposiums. The mission of the DCHWS symposiums is to facilitate an interactive engagement between professionals from government and the private sector related to relevant and topical issues affecting applications of engineering and science associated with cleaning up hazardous waste sites. The symposiums also serve as a platform to facilitate the exchange of information, encourage dialogue, share experiences, and build and enhance communication among design and construction professionals.

This session will include the following presentation:

Site Assessment, Design Considerations, and Performance Results from a Innovative Barrier Application at a Large Chlorinated Plume in Texas

A large chlorinated solvent plume situated in a cemented sandstone bedrock aquifer contaminated private water wells under a residential neighborhood in Texas. Typical HRSC techniques were not feasible due to the aquifer characteristics. Long-term field data will demonstrate how an innovative CSM assessment and barrier design approach achieved MCLs and prevented further off-site migration. Groundwater extraction from private, off-site wells resulted in a large chlorinated solvent plume that needed to be addressed to prevent further off-site migration. Remedial approaches considered included groundwater pump and treat, enhanced reductive dichlorination (ERD), and an in situ carbon sorption/biotreatment. A colloidal activated carbon (CAC) barrier provided the most cost-effective solution by rapidly preventing off-site migration and preventing biofouling of the downgradient potable wells that may develop from typical ERD in situ remedies. This presentation will focus on several innovative approaches to identify contaminant mass flux and the use of an innovative model to predict remedial performance. Performance monitoring data from over 30 months from multiple monitoring wells shown excellent results from the CAC barrier, with the results meeting the project performance objectives (below MCLs) and preventing further contaminant downgradient migration.

Design and Construction Issues at Hazardous Waste Sites Webinar on Successful Remedial Design, Session 2

The Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) Denver Post and Philadelphia Post along with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are hosting a series of webinars based on talks given at recent Design and Construction Issues at Hazardous Waste Sites (DCHWS) Symposiums. The mission of the DCHWS symposiums is to facilitate an interactive engagement between professionals from government and the private sector related to relevant and topical issues affecting applications of engineering and science associated with cleaning up hazardous waste sites. The symposiums also serve as a platform to facilitate the exchange of information, encourage dialogue, share experiences, and build and enhance communication among design and construction professionals.

This session will include the following presentation:

Successful High Density Sludge (HDS) Treatment Plant Design for Acid Mine Drainage

The high density sludge (HDS) process was developed by Bethlehem Steel in the 1960s in response to high sludge disposal costs following lime neutralization treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD). Since then it has become the preeminent AMD treatment process not only for significantly lower sludge production but also for its ability to provide more stable treatment over a wide range of AMD chemistries. However, even after nearly 50 years why and how it works, and what's needed for effective design of an HDS treatment plant, is not widely known. This presentation describes the fundamentals of HDS and key information needed for successful design.

FRTR at 30 Years: Grand Challenges and Opportunities for Advancing Remediation Technologies, Session 1

The Spring 2021 Meeting of the Federal Remediation Technologies Roundtable (FRTR) will be held as two webinar sessions on May 19 and May 26, 2021. This special 30-year anniversary meeting will convene senior leaders from all FRTR member agencies to discuss progress in remediation programs and opportunities for innovative technology applications at complex sites. As always, FRTR meetings are open to the public.

FRTR's objectives for this meeting are to:

  1. Provide an overview of the grand remediation challenges facing member agencies over the next decade.
  2. Discuss specific technology needs across programs.
  3. Highlight agency program initiatives to advance technologies that will expedite and improve site cleanup.


Session 1: Grand Challenges
This session will consist of a virtual panel discussion by senior-level leaders from the FRTR member agencies involved in site remediation programs. The panel discussion will be facilitated by Dan Powell, Chief of the Technology Integration and Information Branch in U.S. EPA's Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation.

Session 2: Advancing New Technologies
This session will consist of a virtual panel discussion by senior-level leaders from the FRTR member agencies involved in research and application of new and innovative site characterization and remediation technologies at complex sites. The panel discussion will be facilitated by Kent Glover of the U.S. Air Force Civil Engineer Center. Dr. Glover is the Air Force Subject Matter Expert (SME) for Remediation Systems and the FRTR Steering Committee Chair.

The following agencies will be represented at this meeting:

  • U.S. Air Force-Civil Engineer Center (AFCEC)
  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE)
  • U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)
  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA)
  • U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
  • U.S. Navy-Naval Facilities Engineering Systems Command (NAVFAC)
  • U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (U.S. NRC)
  • National Institutes of Health-National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
  • Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) and Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP)

FRTR at 30 Years: Grand Challenges and Opportunities for Advancing Remediation Technologies, Session 2

The Spring 2021 Meeting of the Federal Remediation Technologies Roundtable (FRTR) will be held as two webinar sessions on May 19 and May 26, 2021. This special 30-year anniversary meeting will convene senior leaders from all FRTR member agencies to discuss progress in remediation programs and opportunities for innovative technology applications at complex sites. As always, FRTR meetings are open to the public.

FRTR's objectives for this meeting are to:

  1. Provide an overview of the grand remediation challenges facing member agencies over the next decade.
  2. Discuss specific technology needs across programs.
  3. Highlight agency program initiatives to advance technologies that will expedite and improve site cleanup.


Session 1: Grand Challenges
This session will consist of a virtual panel discussion by senior-level leaders from the FRTR member agencies involved in site remediation programs. The panel discussion will be facilitated by Dan Powell, Chief of the Technology Integration and Information Branch in U.S. EPA's Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation.

Session 2: Advancing New Technologies
This session will consist of a virtual panel discussion by senior-level leaders from the FRTR member agencies involved in research and application of new and innovative site characterization and remediation technologies at complex sites. The panel discussion will be facilitated by Kent Glover of the U.S. Air Force Civil Engineer Center. Dr. Glover is the Air Force Subject Matter Expert (SME) for Remediation Systems and the FRTR Steering Committee Chair.

The following agencies will be represented at this meeting:

  • U.S. Air Force-Civil Engineer Center (AFCEC)
  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE)
  • U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)
  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA)
  • U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
  • U.S. Navy-Naval Facilities Engineering Systems Command (NAVFAC)
  • U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (U.S. NRC)
  • National Institutes of Health-National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
  • Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) and Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP)

Risk e-Learning Webinar Series: Session I - Data Sharing Tools, Workflows, and Platforms

The NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) is hosting a Risk e-Learning webinar series focused on SRP-funded data science projects that are enhancing the integration, interoperability, and reuse of data. With these supplements, the SRP encourages data sharing among its grantees to accelerate scientific discoveries, stimulate new collaborations, and increase scientific transparency and rigor.

The first session will introduce tools, strategies, workflows, and platforms developed by SRP researchers to organize existing data obtained from measuring contaminants in an array of environmental media to facilitate interoperability. These strategies were developed to enable researchers to reuse the data to better characterize and understand contaminants present in the environment. We will also hear about the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA's) CompTox Chemicals Dashboard, a compilation of information from many sites and databases developed to organize chemical data and address data gaps.

Risk e-Learning Webinar Series: Session II - Geospatial Platforms for Analysis and Visualization Across Environmental Data

The NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) is hosting a Risk e-Learning webinar series focused on SRP-funded data science projects that are enhancing the integration, interoperability, and reuse of data. With these supplements, the SRP encourages data sharing among its grantees to accelerate scientific discoveries, stimulate new collaborations, and increase scientific transparency and rigor.

In the second session, SRP-funded researchers will describe efforts to combine and analyze datasets using geospatial platforms. These platforms are being used to visualize patterns of exposures and those factors that may affect these patterns, within a geographical area. This session will also feature a speaker supported by the National Science Foundation, who will discuss HydroShare, an online system for sharing hydrologic data and models.

Risk e-Learning Webinar Series: Session III - Integrating Omics Data Across Model Organisms and Populations

The NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) is hosting a Risk e-Learning webinar series focused on SRP-funded data science projects that are enhancing the integration, interoperability, and reuse of data. With these supplements, the SRP encourages data sharing among its grantees to accelerate scientific discoveries, stimulate new collaborations, and increase scientific transparency and rigor.

The third and final session will feature SRP-funded researchers collaborating to combine omics (e.g., genomics, proteomics) data within and across model organisms as well as studies in human populations. We will also hear from The Global Alliance for Genomics and Health about their work to incorporate semantic data models for sharing of genomic data to align with environmental health research.

Mining Webinar Series: Assessment and Rehabilitation of Humid Region Mine Sites and Wastes

This seminar will review the essential steps and protocols for the assessment and rehabilitation of active and abandoned mining sites in humid regions with examples drawn from the mid-Atlantic USA. In these environments, appropriate stabilization and closure plans must address direct surface revegetation and erosion control along with predicting and controlling adverse water quality discharges. Important site-specific limitations that must be assessed and planned for include (1) avoiding acid-forming materials, (2) minimizing mine soil compaction, (3) ensuring adequate plant moisture supply, and (4) accounting for slope x aspect effects. Due to the net leaching climate, reclamation practitioners must also predict and manage against emission of acid mine/rock drainage in many instances and/or circumneutral high TDS discharges in others. Specific examples will include reclamation of surface coal mines to hayland/pasture or native forests, stabilization and revegetation of acid-forming coal refuse, and return of mineral sands (Ti and Zr) mines to prime farmland row cropping systems. The seminar will cover recommendations for (a) pre-mine closure overburden and soil testing, (b) mine soil reconstruction, (c) basics of AMD/TDS drainage potential prediction, (d) topsoil and organic matter management, and (e) long term soil fertility and pH management concerns. Complete supporting materials and publications are available at https://landrehab.org/.
Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Sites contaminated with dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) and DNAPL mixtures present significant environmental challenges. Despite the decades spent on characterizing and attempting to remediate DNAPL sites, substantial risk remains. Inadequate characterization of site geology as well as the distribution, characteristics, and behavior of contaminants -- by relying on traditional monitoring well methods rather than more innovative and integrated approaches -- has limited the success of many remediation efforts.

The Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization Team has synthesized the knowledge about DNAPL site characterization and remediation acquired over the past several decades, and has integrated that information into a new document, Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization and Tools Selection (ISC-1, 2015). This guidance is a resource to inform regulators, responsible parties, other problem holders, consultants, community stakeholders, and other interested parties of the critical concepts related to characterization approaches and tools for collecting subsurface data at DNAPL sites. After this associated training, participants will be able to use the ITRC Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization and Tools Selection (ISC-1, 2015) guidance to develop and support an integrated approach to DNAPL site characterization, including:
  • Identify what site conditions must be considered when developing an informative DNAPL conceptual site model (CSM)
  • Define an objectives-based DNAPL characterization strategy
  • Understand what tools and resources are available to improve the identification, collection, and evaluation of appropriate site characterization data
  • Navigate the DNAPL characterization tools table and select appropriate technologies to fill site-specific data gaps
For reference during the training class, participants should have a copy of Figure 4-1, the integrated site characterization flow diagram from the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance document: Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization and Tools Selection (ISC-1, 2015) and available as a PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/IDSC/ITRC-ISC-Figures.pdf
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Connecting the Science to Managing LNAPL Sites a 3 Part Series

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Connecting the Science to Managing LNAPL Sites - 3-Part Series

The newly updated LNAPLs (Light Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids) 3-part training course series is based on the ITRC guidance: LNAPL Site Management: LCSM Evolution, Decision Process, and Remedial Technologies (LNAPL-3, 2018) and focuses on connecting the science to managing LNAPL sites and helping you:
  • Build upon your Understanding of LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface (Part 1)
  • Develop your LNAPL Conceptual Site Model and LNAPL Remedial Goals (Part 2)
  • Select/Implement LNAPL Technologies (Part 3)
After this training series, the expectation is that you will have the skills and understanding to use ITRC science-based resources to improve decision making at your LNAPL sites. For regulators and other government agency staff, this improved understanding can hopefully be incorporated into your own LNAPL programs.

It is recommended that participants have a general understanding of hydrogeology and some familiarity with petroleum contaminated sites. The courses will build on your existing LNAPL knowledge and outline the framework for making LNAPL remediation and management decisions. It is expected that participants will attend this 3-part training series in sequence.

LNAPL Training Part 1: Understanding LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface
Part 1 teaches how LNAPLs behave in the subsurface and examines what controls their behavior. Part 1:
  • Explains what LNAPL data can tell you about the LNAPL and site conditions
  • Covers how that information is applied to the development of an LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM) (Part 2) and LNAPL technology selection (Part 3)
Relevant and practical examples are used to illustrate key concepts.

LNAPL Training Part 2: LNAPL Conceptual Site Models and the LNAPL Decision Process
Part 2 teaches participants how to develop an LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM) and the overall framework for making LNAPL remediation and management decisions. Part 2:
  • Discusses key LNAPL and site data
  • Explains when and why those data may be important
  • Covers how to effectively organize the data into an LCSM
Part 2 also discusses how to address LNAPL concerns by selecting appropriate goals and objectives, choosing applicable technologies, and assigning remedial performance metrics and endpoints.

LNAPL Training Part 3: Using LNAPL Science, the LCSM, and LNAPL Goals to Select an LNAPL Remedial Technology
Part 3 of the training teaches the importance of informed remedial technology selection and appropriate technology application. Part 3:
  • Discusses remedial technology groups
  • Introduces specific and new remedial technologies
  • Reviews the technology selection process, how technologies can be combined to accelerate cleanup, and how the LCSM informs selection
A case study and examples demonstrate the use of these tools for remedial technology selection, implementation, and demonstration of successful remediation.
Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, LNAPL Site Management: LCSM Evolution, Decision Process, and Remedial Technologies (LNAPL-3, 2018), prior to attending the class.

ITRC PFAS Roundtable

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council This fourth PFAS Roundtable Session offers a unique opportunity to interact directly with experts from the ITRC PFAS Team from around the country on several topics: Human and Ecological Health Effects, Site Risk Assessment, Regulations, Risk Communication and Stakeholder Perspectives. Participants are requested to submit questions in advance of the event to be addressed during this extended Question and Answer discussion with expert panelists. The session is intended to be tailored to the specific needs of its participants, with the expectation that the participant will have a basic understanding of these topics prior to attending the Roundtable Session.

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) constitute a large family of fluorinated chemicals, exceeding several thousand in commercial use or the environment that vary widely in their chemical and physical properties. The persistence and mobility of some PFAS, combined with decades of widespread use in industrial processes, certain types of firefighting foams, and consumer products, have resulted in their being present in most environmental media at trace levels across the globe. PFAS have only recently come to the attention of investigators and the public in large part due to the fact that until the early 2000s analytical methods to detect low levels of PFAS in the environment were available only in a few select research institutions. It was not until the early 2010s that these methods to detect a limited number of PFAS became widely available and had detection limits in water low enough to be commensurate with levels of potential human health effects. Toxicological studies have raised concerns regarding the bioaccumulative nature and potential health concerns of some PFAS. As a result, our understanding of PFAS and the risks they may pose is rapidly evolving.

This Roundtable Session is based on the following ITRC-produced resources:
  • A series of fact sheets that synthesize key information about PFAS science. In particular for this webinar, the Regulations fact sheet, the Human and Ecological Health Effects and Risk Assessment fact sheet, the Risk Communication fact sheet, and the Stakeholder Perspectives fact sheet are available resources. The fact sheets were published in 2020.

  • A web-based technical and regulatory guidance document published by the ITRC PFAS Team in April 2020 that presents the necessary breadth and depth not given by the fact sheets, stakeholder points of view, technical challenges and uncertainties, risk communication strategies, and provides links to pertinent scientific literature. Limited small changes and some references were added to the document in September 2020 to address a range of quickly changing topics. In 2021, ITRC plans to update the technical and regulatory guidance document with new information and regulatory approaches that become available to address the evolving understanding of these contaminants. The document is supported by external files, including a regularly updated tabular summary of PFAS water and soil values used by various regulatory agencies across the United States.

  • Online training materials that convey the information presented in the technical and regulatory guidance document. Ten video training modules and brief introductory videos on the topics are posted on ITRC's YouTube channel. Additionally, the Team provided in-person training workshops to approximately 2,550 attendees through March 2020. In 2020 an additional 500 people attended virtual workshops. In 2021, the Team plans to provide additional online training resources. More information will be available on the ITRC Training page.

The target audience for this guidance and Roundtable Session is:
  • state and federal environmental staff working on PFAS-contaminated sites
  • Other project managers and decision makers
  • Stakeholders who are involved in community engagement

As a participant in this Roundtable Session you should learn more about:
  • PFAS Regulations
  • Human and Ecological Health Effects
  • Site Risk Assessment
  • Risk Communication
  • Stakeholder Perspectives

Participants are highly encouraged to review the Guidance Document (https://pfas-1.itrcweb.org - specifically Sections 7, 8, 9, 13 and 14), the Water and Soil Values and Basis for PFOA and PFOS Values tabular summaries (https://pfas-1.itrcweb.org/fact-sheets/), and review the associated ITRC video training modules prior to attending the Roundtable Session:


Archives of past Roundtable Sessions are available on the CLU-IN website and Q&A Digests are available on the ITRC PFAS Roundtable Training page (https://www.itrcweb.org/Training/Roundtables).

To assist the panelists in preparing for the Roundtable Session, we request that you provide your questions for the following topics:
  • PFAS Regulations
  • Human and Ecological Health Effects
  • Site Risk Assessment
  • Risk Communication
  • Stakeholder Perspectives

Please provide your questions no later than May 18 so that the ITRC PFAS team can prepare for the Roundtable Session. If you have additional questions after registering, please email them to training@itrcweb.org

Sustainable Resilient Remediation (SRR)

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Extreme weather events and wildfires are increasing and impacting hazardous waste sites. The primary goal of cleanups, which is protecting human health and the environment, is un-dermined. Confronted with these risks, environmental professionals should assess, and de-sign remedies that are sustainable and resilient. Sustainable resilient remediation (SRR) is an optimized solution to cleaning up and reusing a hazardous waste site that limits negative envi-ronmental impacts, maximizes social and economic benefits, and creates resilience against increasing threats.

The objective of the ITRC Sustainable Resilient Remediation (SRR-1) is to provide resources and tools for regulators, stakeholders, consultants, and responsible parties to help integrate sustainable and resilient practices into remediation projects. This guidance updates the Inter-state Technology and Regulatory Council's (ITRC) Technical and Regulatory Guidance: Green and Sustainable Remediation: A Practical Framework (ITRC 2011a) and includes a strong resilience component to address the increasing threat of extreme weather events and wildfires. Rec-ommendations for careful and continuous consideration of the social and economic costs and benefits of a cleanup project are included.

Training Objectives
  • Educate participants about available SRR resources and tools
  • Impart evolution from Green and Sustainable Remediation (GSR) to SRR
  • Provide guidance on practical application and implementation of SRR
  • Provide participants with information necessary to navigate the SRR guidance and tools

Training Goals
  • Provide information and resources for the social and economic dimensions of sus-tainability, including state-of-the-art social and economic evaluation tools
  • Provide a framework illustrating how and why sustainability and resilience should be integrated throughout the remedial project life cycle
  • Offer checklists of key sustainable best management practices to address resili-ence based on specific vulnerabilities at a site, as well as resources for additional information
  • Present interactive maps with links to available state and federal resources to quickly find examples and best practices from your state or other states and fed-eral agencies
  • Reference case studies illustrating the application of SRR considerations

After the SRR Training, a user will have the tools necessary to understand what SRR is and how it can be used to achieve a sustainable and resilient remediation outcome. This can be accomplished by remediation practitioners applying the principles and practices to a contami-nated site and by providing SRR resources to help regulators and stakeholders in the devel-opment and review of project documents or submittals.

The intended users of this guidance and training course are those individuals responsible for managing contaminated sites. Users of this training and the associated documents will devel-op an understanding of SRR and its importance in achieving sustainability and resilience for site remediation. Principals, best practices, resources, and trainer insights will help users conduct SRR tailored to the needs of the sites under their care.

Recommended Reading: Participants are strongly encouraged to review the ITRC Sustainable Resilient Remediation, (SRR-1) document prior to participating in the training class. Also, be-cause SRR-1 is an expansion and update of the concepts developed in Green and Sustainable Remediation: A Practical Framework, GSR-2, review of this document is recommended but is not a prerequisite.

TPH Risk Evaluation at Petroleum-Contaminated Sites

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Remediation at petroleum release sites is often infeasible for technical or cost reasons. Many of these sites could be depleted in typical indicator compounds, such as BTEXN, but still heavily contaminated in terms of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH). The traditional indicator compound approach for managing petroleum contaminants may not fully identify short- and long-term potential environmental concerns, can create delays in project schedules and cost overages for sub-surface utility work or redevelopment. It is important to consider a comprehensive cumulative risk-based approach to more effectively incorporate TPH data in addition to traditional BTEXN data for cleanup and long-term management decisions.

The basis for this training course is the ITRC guidance: TPH Risk Evaluation at Petroleum-Contaminated Sites (TPHRisk-1, 2018). The guidance builds on long-standing and current research and experience, and presents the current science for evaluating TPH risk at petroleum-contaminated sites. The methods and procedures to evaluate human and ecological risk and establish cleanup requirements in the various media at petroleum release sites will assist decision makers in developing and implementing a technically defensible approach. In addition, the guidance provides information and supplemental references to assist practitioners and project managers in the assessment of fate, transport, exposure, and toxicity of TPH. The guidance users will also gain information that may be used in conjunction with classic tiered approaches for risk-based decision making (ASTM 2015b, ITRC Risk 3 2015), including modifications in the assessment and remedial-decision and regulatory framework for TPH impacts through direct comparison to screening levels, site-specific modification of screening levels, and complete site-specific risk assessment for sources, receptors, and pathways, where appropriate.

The target audience for this guidance and training course is:
  • Regulators and Program Managers interested in knowing how site management decisions can influence the TPH risk evaluation process.
  • Risk assessors new to TPH data or those who want additional knowledge and training in the current methods and common practices for collecting and using TPH data in assessments to more accurately determine human health and/or ecological risks at petroleum-contaminated sites.
  • Stakeholders who are either engaged in redevelopment at former petroleum release sites or folks who are involved in community engagement and revitalization activities.
As a participant in this training you should learn to:
  • Recognize the ITRC document as a go-to resource for evaluating TPH risk at petroleum-contaminated sites
  • Recognize how TPH -impacted media interacts with the environment and changes over time
  • Select appropriate analytic method(s) to match site objectives
  • Apply the decision framework to determine when a site-specific target level may be more appropriate than a generic screening level for TPH
Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, TPH Risk Evaluation at Petroleum-Contaminated Sites (TPHRisk-1, 2018) prior to attending the class.

ITRC Vapor Intrusion Mitigation (VIM-1)

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council When certain contaminants or hazardous substances are released into the soil or groundwater, they may volatilize into soil gas. Vapor intrusion (VI) occurs when these vapors migrate up into overlying buildings and contaminate indoor air. ITRC has previously released guidance documents focused on VI, including the "Vapor Intrusion Pathway: A Practical Guidance" (VI-1, 2007) and "Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management" (PVI, 2014). However, ITRC has received multiple requests for additional details and training on mitigation strategies for addressing this exposure pathway.

The ITRC Vapor Intrusion Mitigation Team (VIMT) created ten fact sheets, 16 technology information sheets, and 4 checklists with the goal of assisting regulators during review of vapor intrusion mitigation systems, and helping contractors understand the essential elements of planning, design, implementation, and operation, maintenance and monitoring (OM&M) of mitigation systems.

The Vapor Intrusion Mitigation training is a series of eight (8) modules, presented over two sessions as noted in the graphic below.

The Vapor Intrusion Mitigation training series provides an overview of vapor intrusion mitigation and presenting information from the ITRC fact sheets, technology information sheets, and checklists (VIM-1, 2021):
  • Introduction & Overview of Vapor Intrusion Mitigation Training Team
  • Conceptual Site Models for Vapor Intrusion Mitigation
  • Public Outreach During Vapor Intrusion Mitigation
  • Rapid Response & Ventilation for Vapor Intrusion Mitigation
  • Active Mitigation Approaches
  • Passive Mitigation Approaches
  • System Verification, OM&M, and Exit Strategies
  • Remediation & Institutional Controls

After the Vapor Intrusion Mitigation series, you should understand:
  • How to locate and utilize the VIM-1 fact sheets, technology information sheets, and checklists
  • The importance of a VI mitigation conceptual site model
  • How public outreach for VI mitigation differs from other environmental matters
  • When to implement rapid response for vapor intrusion and applicable methodologies
  • The differences between remediation, mitigation, and institutional controls
  • Available technologies for active and passive mitigation, and design considerations for various approaches
  • How/when/why different mitigation technologies are appropriate
  • How to verify mitigation system success, address underperformance, and develop a plan for discontinuing a mitigation system

We encourage you to use the ITRC Vapor Intrusion Mitigation work products (VIM-1) and these training modules to learn about vapor intrusion mitigation and how you can apply these best practices to improve decision-making at your sites. For regulators and other government agency staff, this understanding of vapor intrusion mitigation can be incorporated into your own programs.

While the training makes every effort to keep the information accessible to a wide audience, it is assumed that the participants will have some basic technical understanding of chemistry, environmental sciences, and risk assessment. As with other emerging contaminants, our understanding of vapor intrusion mitigation continues to advance. This training provides the participants with information on areas where the science is evolving and where uncertainty persists.
The Training Exchange (Trainex)

The Training Exchange website (Trainex) is designed to provide a wide range of training information to EPA, other federal agency, state, tribal, and local staff involved in hazardous waste management and remediation. Trainex focuses on free training directed to federal and state staff. This site includes training schedules for deliveries of many courses, both classroom and Internet-based.

EPA works in partnership with organizations, such as the Interstate Technology Regulatory Council (ITRC), and other agencies, such as the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), to offer training relevant to hazardous waste remediation, site characterization, risk assessment, emergency response, site/incident management, counter-terrorism, and the community's role in site management and cleanup.

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