U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

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Upcoming Internet Seminars
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CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatERTP Presents...Soil Sampling and A...

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Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization
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Adverse Outcome Pathways: Session I - Introduction to the Adverse Outcome Pathway Framework

The NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) is hosting a seminar series focused on adverse outcome pathways (AOPs), which are structured ways to represent biological events leading to adverse health effects. In the first session, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) staff will provide an introduction and overview of AOPs and discuss the AOP Knowledgebase, which is designed to house descriptions of the biological mechanisms underlying chemical toxicity in a structured manner.

The AOP framework was developed as a means for organizing biological and toxicological knowledge concerning the linkages between molecular-level perturbations of biological systems by stressors and the apical hazards (e.g., disease in humans, reduced survival, growth, reproduction in wildlife) that can result. As such, the AOP framework can help support greater use of mechanistic or pathway-based data in risk assessment and regulatory decision-making.

Daniel Villeneuve, Ph.D., will introduce the AOP framework, major principles that guide the development and description of AOPs within the AOP-knowledgebase, and will give examples of some prominent applications of AOPs.

Stephen Edwards, Ph.D., will discuss the design of the AOP Knowledgebase and how this supports both AOP development and use. It will include the assembly of AOP networks and their importance when using AOPs. It will also consider methods for developing AOP networks in an automated fashion to complement the expert-driven AOP development efforts within the AOP knowledgebase.

This webinar is also in support of an upcoming NIEHS/NHLBI Workshop, Understanding the Combined Effects of Environmental Chemical and Non-Chemical Stressors: Atherosclerosis as a Model, which will take place at NIEHS in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, April 3 - 4, 2018. The goal of this workshop is to identify key biological mechanisms/pathways of the combined effects of chemical and non-chemical stressors associated with atherosclerosis. A critical research area that requires further exploration is the biological mechanisms and effects of exposure to both environmental chemicals (e.g., air pollution, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, metals, pesticides) and non-chemical stressors (e.g., psychosocial, lifestyle, quality of life, poor nutrition, infectious agents, physical stressors) over time and the roles they may play in the development of disease (e.g., cancer, cardiac, metabolic, neurological). This workshop will bring together experts to discuss the state of the science pertaining to underlying biological pathways associated with, when combined, chemical and non-chemical stressors in relation to atherosclerosis. This workshop will use the AOP framework to assist in the discussion of the pathways considered by workshop participants.

ERTP Presents...Soil Sampling and Analysis for Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)

Careful there! Precise characterization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soil is often critical since decisions for remediation are based on analytical measurement. Unfortunately, the acts of collecting and storing soil can subject soils to numerous variables that can alter VOC concentrations. These variables may enhance volatilization, biodegradation, and loss of VOCs in the sample.

This webinar will show why proper sample handling and preparation methods are key to collecting high-quality soil samples for VOCs. In this webinar we will explore the properties of VOCs, soil sampling methodologies, collection devices, VOC laboratory analyses, and other considerations.

During the webinar, we will further discuss:

  • The collection of high-quality soil samples for VOCs;
  • Best practices for sampling techniques to minimize the loss of VOCs;
  • The advantages and disadvantages of soil sampling devices such as Encore and TerraCore samplers.

The intended audience for the Soil Sampling and Analysis for VOCs webinar are state and federal regulators, project managers, and consultant personnel responsible for and/or directly involved in developing, identifying, or applying soil sampling approaches at their sites.

ERTP Presents...High Performing Teams: Participating, Leading, Coaching

In this webinar we will explore the definition, development, dynamics, and characteristics of "High Performing Teams". There are multiple developmental stages that teams progress through to become high performing; many team members are unaware of these stages. We will examine the behavior and characteristics of the team in these stages as well as the leadership required to maximize team performance in each stage.

During the webinar, we will discuss:

  • The traits and qualities the team needs to become high performing and the responsibility of the team members;
  • The attributes and behaviors that team members need to bring to the team to allow the team to perform successfully;
  • The skills required to lead the team and the concept of shared leadership.

High Performing Teams: Participating, Leading, Coaching is intended for those looking to discover styles, skills, and techniques to help their teams become the most productive and efficient they can be. This webinar could be of benefit to those working under the Incident Command System (ICS) to ensure effective coordination throughout the Incident Management. Team (IMT) during a response to an incident.

Ecosystem Services Approaches and Tools for Contaminated Site Cleanup

Ecosystem services are nature's contributions to human health and well-being. Examples include outdoor recreation, pollination of food crops, and flood mitigation. Considering how cleanup impacts ecosystem services could inform site management actions, including the ecological risk assessment, greener cleanups, and future land use. This webinar presents an ecosystem services evaluation framework. Two quantitative evaluation tools, EPA EnviroAtlas and Service Providing Area (SPA) maps, are demonstrated. Superfund site managers from Region 3 and Region 10 share anecdotes of how they considered ecosystem services during cleanup and implemented innovative approaches for ecological revitalization. Ecosystem services approaches and tools may be helpful to ecological risk assessors and remediation project managers working on sites with existing ecosystems and/or sites with ecological reuse options.

First-Timer's Guide to the 2017 National Brownfields Training Conference

New to the 2017 National Brownfields Training Conference? This session will help you get the most out of your visit to Pittsburgh and connect you with longtime brownfields professionals who keep coming back to learn the latest community revitalization practices. The session will feature perspectives from government, nonprofits and consultants, who will share tips about how to make the most out of your first experience at the National Brownfields Training Conference.

Military Munitions Support Services - MMRP Explosive Safety

This session will discuss updated safety developments when dealing with scrappers, underwater issues and the 3 R's.

Biochar: A New Tunable Tool in the Soil Remediation Toolbox

There are approximately 500,000 abandoned mines across the U.S., which pose a considerable, pervasive risk to human health and the environment due to possible exposure to the residuals of heavy metal extraction. Historically, a variety of chemical and biological methods have been used to reduce the bioavailability of the metals at abandoned mine sites. Biochar is emerging as a novel soil amendment for agriculture and environmental applications that can be used to increase soil carbon, adjust soil pH, supply and retain nutrients, reduce heavy metal bioavailability, improve soil water holding and infiltration, sequester carbon, and provide refugia for soil organisms.

Biochar is a charcoal-like, carbon-rich, porous byproduct of thermal pyrolysis or gasification. What makes biochar unique is that its properties are tunable, meaning that they can be manipulated or adjusted to optimize the benefits of using it as a soil amendment. It has the potential to complex and immobilize heavy metals to reduce bioavailability in situ. Simultaneously, biochar can improve soil conditions for plant growth and promote the establishment of a soil-stabilizing native plant community to reduce offsite movement of metal-laden waste materials.

Because biochar properties depend upon feedstock selection, pyrolysis production conditions, and the activation procedures used, they can be designed to meet specific remediation needs and specific soil remediation situations. However, techniques are needed to optimally match biochar characteristics with metals contaminated soils to effectively reduce metal bioavailability.

You are invited to learn more about EPA’s biochar research program and the potential for biochar use in soil remediation at mining sites. The webinar, scheduled for November 7, will be presented by Dr. Mark Johnson, EPA Research Soil Scientist.
Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Sites contaminated with dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) and DNAPL mixtures present significant environmental challenges. Despite the decades spent on characterizing and attempting to remediate DNAPL sites, substantial risk remains. Inadequate characterization of site geology as well as the distribution, characteristics, and behavior of contaminants -- by relying on traditional monitoring well methods rather than more innovative and integrated approaches -- has limited the success of many remediation efforts.

The Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization Team has synthesized the knowledge about DNAPL site characterization and remediation acquired over the past several decades, and has integrated that information into a new document, Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization and Tools Selection (ISC-1, 2015). This guidance is a resource to inform regulators, responsible parties, other problem holders, consultants, community stakeholders, and other interested parties of the critical concepts related to characterization approaches and tools for collecting subsurface data at DNAPL sites. After this associated training, participants will be able to use the ITRC Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization and Tools Selection (ISC-1, 2015) guidance to develop and support an integrated approach to DNAPL site characterization, including:
  • Identify what site conditions must be considered when developing an informative DNAPL conceptual site model (CSM)
  • Define an objectives-based DNAPL characterization strategy
  • Understand what tools and resources are available to improve the identification, collection, and evaluation of appropriate site characterization data
  • Navigate the DNAPL characterization tools table and select appropriate technologies to fill site-specific data gaps
For reference during the training class, participants should have a copy of Figure 4-1, the integrated site characterization flow diagram from the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance document: Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization and Tools Selection (ISC-1, 2015) and available as a PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/IDSC/ITRC-ISC-Figures.pdf
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Use and Measurement of Mass Flux and Mass Discharge

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Most decisions at groundwater contamination sites are driven by measurements of contaminant concentration -- snapshots of contaminant concentrations that may appear to be relatively stable or show notable changes over time. Decisions can be improved by considering mass flux and mass discharge. Mass flux and mass discharge quantify the source or plume strength at a given time and location resulting in better-informed management decisions regarding site prioritization or remedial design as well as lead to significant improvements in remediation efficiency and faster cleanup times. The use of mass flux and mass discharge is increasing and will accelerate as field methods improve and practitioners and regulators become familiar with its application, advantages, and limitations. The decision to collect and evaluate mass flux data is site-specific. It should consider the reliability of other available data, the uncertainty associated with mass flux measurements, the specific applications of the mass flux data, and the cost-benefit of collecting mass measurements.

The ITRC technology overview, Use and Measurement of Mass Flux and Mass Discharge (MASSFLUX-1, 2010), and associated Internet-based training provide a description of the underlying concepts, potential applications, description of methods for measuring and calculating, and case studies of the uses of mass flux and mass discharge. This Technology Overview, and associated internet based training are intended to foster the appropriate understanding and application of mass flux and mass discharge estimates, and provide examples of use and analysis. The document and training assumes the participant has a general understanding of hydrogeology, the movement of chemicals in porous media, remediation technologies, and the overall remedial process. Practitioners, regulators, and others working on groundwater sites should attend this training course to learn more about various methods and potential use of mass flux and mass discharge information.

Geophysical Classification for Munitions Response

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council For decades, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) has produced and used military munitions for live-fire testing and training to prepare the U.S. military for combat operations. As a result, unexploded ordnance (UXO) and discarded military munitions may be present at over 5,200 former ranges and former munitions operating facilities throughout the United States. With the traditional technique to identify munitions for removal at these sites, DOD and its contractors have used various types of detection instruments to simply detect buried metal objects then excavation and examination of most of the detected items, to determine whether or not they are military munitions. Even highly trained UXO-qualified personnel typically excavate hundreds of metal items for each one munition recovered. Nearly half of these sites require a munitions response, at an estimated cost to complete of $14 billion and with a completion date of 2100. To improve the efficiency of munitions response, DOD’s Environmental Security Technology Certification Program and its research partners in academia and industry have developed a new approach: geophysical classification. Geophysical classification is the process of using advanced data to make principled decisions as to whether buried metal objects are potentially hazardous munitions (that is targets of interest) that should be excavated, or items such as metal clutter and debris (non-targets of interest) that can be left in the ground.

ITRC’s Geophysical Classification for Munitions Response (GCMR-2, 2015) and training class explain the process of geophysical classification, describe its benefits and limitations, and discuss the information and data needed by regulators to monitor and evaluate the use of the technology. This document and training also emphasize using a systematic planning process to develop data acquisition and decision strategies at the outset of a munitions response effort, as well as quality considerations throughout the project. Stakeholder issues that are unique to munitions response are also discussed. After this training class, participants will:
  • Understand the technology and terminology
  • Be ready to engage in the planning process to address quality considerations throughout a project
  • Find tools to transfer knowledge within organizations and to stakeholders
  • Start to transition mindset to decisions that leave non-hazardous items in the ground
An audience who understand current munitions response tools and procedures (for example, geophysical surveys, sensors, data analysis) will benefit most from this document and training. For federal and state environmental regulators, scientists, and engineers, as well as contractors, munitions response managers, technical staff, geophysicists, and stakeholders, this document explains how geophysical classification can be used in munitions response. Stakeholders with an interest in a particular munitions response site (MRS) at which classification has been or may be proposed will also benefit from this document and training.

For use during this training class, we created a reference with the Terminology and Acronyms used in ITRC “Geophysical Classification for Munitions Response” Training.

Issues and Options in Human Health Risk Assessment - A Resource When Alternatives to Default Parameters and Scenarios are Proposed

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Many state and local regulatory agencies responsible for the cleanup of chemicals released to the environment have adopted regulations, guidance and policies that define default approaches, scenarios, and parameters as a starting point for risk assessment and the development of risk-based screening values. Regulatory project managers and decision makers, however, may not have specific guidance when alternative approaches, scenarios, and parameters are proposed for site-specific risk assessments, and are faced with difficult technical issues when evaluating these site-specific risk assessments. This ITRC web-based document is a resource for project managers and decision makers to help evaluate alternatives to risk assessment default approaches, scenarios and parameters.

ITRC's Decision Making at Contaminated Sites: Issues and Options in Human Health Risk Assessment (RISK-3, 2015) guidance document is different from existing ITRC Risk Assessment guidance and other state and federal resources because it identifies commonly encountered issues and discusses options in risk assessment when applying site-specific alternatives to defaults. In addition, the document includes links to resources and tools that provide even more detailed information on the specific issues and potential options. The ITRC Risk Assessment Team believes that state regulatory agencies and other organizations can use the RISK-3 document as a resource or reference to supplement their existing guidance. Community members and other stakeholders also may find this document helpful in understanding and using risk assessment information.

After participating in this ITRC training course, the learner will be able to apply ITRC's Decision Making at Contaminated Sites: Issues and Options in Human Health Risk (RISK-3, 2015) document when developing or reviewing site-specific risk assessments by:
  • Identifying common issues encountered when alternatives to default parameters and scenarios are proposed during the planning, data evaluation, toxicity, exposure assessment, and risk characterization and providing possible options for addressing these issues
  • Recognizing the value of proper planning and the role of stakeholders in the development and review of risk assessments
  • Providing information (that includes links to additional resources and tools) to support decision making when alternatives to default approaches, scenarios and parameters are proposed
ITRC offers additional documents and training on risk management. ITRC's Use of Risk Assessment in Management of Contaminated Sites (RISK-2, 2008) and associated Internet-based training archive highlight variation of risk-based site management and describes how to improve the use of risk assessment for making better risk management decisions. ITRC's Examination of Risk-Based Screening Values and Approaches of Selected States (RISK-1, 2005) and associated Internet-based training archive focus on the process by which risk-based levels are derived in different states.

Groundwater Statistics for Environmental Project Managers

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Statistical techniques may be used throughout the process of cleaning up contaminated groundwater. It is challenging for practitioners, who are not experts in statistics, to interpret, and use statistical techniques. ITRC developed the Technical and Regulatory Web-based Guidance on Groundwater Statistics and Monitoring Compliance (GSMC-1, 2013, http://www.itrcweb.org/gsmc-1/) and this associated training specifically for environmental project managers who review or use statistical calculations for reports, who make recommendations or decisions based on statistics, or who need to demonstrate compliance for groundwater projects. The training class will encourage and support project managers and others who are not statisticians to:

ITRC's Technical and Regulatory Web-based Guidance on Groundwater Statistics and Monitoring Compliance (GSMC-1, 2013) and this associated training bring clarity to the planning, implementation, and communication of groundwater statistical methods and should lead to greater confidence and transparency in the use of groundwater statistics for site management.

Geospatial Analysis for Optimization at Environmental Sites

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Optimization activities can improve performance, increase monitoring efficiency, and support contaminated site decisions. Project managers can use geospatial analysis for evaluation of optimization opportunities. Unlike traditional statistical analysis, geospatial methods incorporate the spatial and temporal dependence between nearby data points, which is an important feature of almost all data collected as part of an environmental investigation. The results of geospatial analyses add additional lines of evidence to decision making in optimization opportunities in environmental sites across all project life cycle stages (release detection, site characterization, remediation, monitoring and closure) in soil, groundwater or sediment remediation projects for different sizes and types of sites.

The purpose of ITRC's Geospatial Analysis for Optimization at Environmental Sites (GRO-1) guidance document and this associated training is to explain, educate, and train state regulators and other practitioners in understanding and using geospatial analyses to evaluate optimization opportunities at environmental sites. With the ITRC GRO-1 web-based guidance document and this associated training class, project managers will be able to:
  • Evaluate available data and site needs to determine if geospatial analyses are appropriate for a given site
  • For a project and specific lifecycle stage, identify optimization questions where geospatial methods can contribution to better decision making
  • For a project and optimization question(s), select appropriate geospatial method(s) and software using the geospatial analysis work flow, tables and flow charts in the guidance document
  • With geospatial analyses results (note: some geospatial analyses may be performed by the project manager, but many geospatial analyses will be performed by technical experts), explain what the results mean and appropriately apply in decision making
  • Use the project manager’s tool box, interactive flow charts for choosing geospatial methods and review checklist to use geospatial analyses confidently in decision making
The Training Exchange (Trainex)

The Training Exchange website (Trainex) is designed to provide a wide range of training information to EPA, other federal agency, state, tribal, and local staff involved in hazardous waste management and remediation. Trainex focuses on free training directed to federal and state staff. This site includes training schedules for deliveries of many courses, both classroom and Internet-based.

EPA works in partnership with organizations, such as the Interstate Technology Regulatory Council (ITRC), and other agencies, such as the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), to offer training relevant to hazardous waste remediation, site characterization, risk assessment, emergency response, site/incident management, counter-terrorism, and the community's role in site management and cleanup.

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