U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

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CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatITRC Long-term Contaminant Manageme...

Long-term Contaminant Management Using Institutional Controls
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatITRC Characterization and Remediati...

Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock
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Contaminated Sediments Virtual Workshop Session 1 - Site Characterization

The US EPA Office of Research and Development / Office of Science Policy (ORD/OSP) in cooperation with the Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) is sponsoring a 4-part virtual workshop series to address current challenges at contaminated sediment sites. The aim of the virtual workshop is to provide interactive discussions between subject matter expert panelists and workshop participants. Consequently, each virtual session will feature brief topic introductions by panelists followed by facilitated panelist/participant discussions which will include opportunities for questions and answers, brainstorming, identification of concerns and research needs, and quick spot surveys. If you have a contaminated sediment site, this is the virtual workshop for you!

Proper characterization of a contaminated sediment site is crucial to the success of future actions taken at the site. The first session will address the following topics:
  • Selection of appropriate models and estimated model level of effort,
  • Use of the incremental sampling (IS) method at sediment sites, and
  • Passive sampling of pore water and a discussion of its limitations.

Contaminated Sediments Virtual Workshop Session 2 - Risk Assessment

The US EPA Office of Research and Development / Office of Science Policy (ORD/OSP) in cooperation with the Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) is sponsoring a 4-part virtual workshop series to address current challenges at contaminated sediment sites. The aim of the virtual workshop is to provide interactive discussions between subject matter expert panelists and workshop participants. Consequently, each virtual session will feature brief topic introductions by panelists followed by facilitated panelist/participant discussions which will include opportunities for questions and answers, brainstorming, identification of concerns and research needs, and quick spot surveys. If you have a contaminated sediment site, this is the virtual workshop for you!

Risk assessment is essential for the development and selection of appropriate cleanup goals at sites. The second session will address the following topics:
  • An overview of toxicity assessments,
  • Ecological considerations with a focus on bioaccumulation, and
  • Benchmark use in screening level human health and ecological risk assessments and updates regarding benchmark gaps and recent advances.

Contaminated Sediments Virtual Workshop Session 3 - Remediation Technologies

The US EPA Office of Research and Development / Office of Science Policy (ORD/OSP) in cooperation with the Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) is sponsoring a 4-part virtual workshop series to address current challenges at contaminated sediment sites. The aim of the virtual workshop is to provide interactive discussions between subject matter expert panelists and workshop participants. Consequently, each virtual session will feature brief topic introductions by panelists followed by facilitated panelist/participant discussions which will include opportunities for questions and answers, brainstorming, identification of concerns and research needs, and quick spot surveys. If you have a contaminated sediment site, this is the virtual workshop for you!

The third session will focus on both innovative and established remediation technologies available for contaminated sediment sites, as well as technology selection criteria. The third session will address the following topics:
  • Remediating mercury-contaminated sediment sites,
  • Selection criteria for sediment remediation technologies,
  • PCB dechlorinating and degrading with bioamended GAC, and
  • Reactive caps for dissolved and non-aqueous phase-liquids (NAPL).

Contaminated Sediments Virtual Workshop Session 4 - Long-Term Monitoring

The US EPA Office of Research and Development / Office of Science Policy (ORD/OSP) in cooperation with the Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) is sponsoring a 4-part virtual workshop series to address current challenges at contaminated sediment sites. The aim of the virtual workshop is to provide interactive discussions between subject matter expert panelists and workshop participants. Consequently, each virtual session will feature brief topic introductions by panelists followed by facilitated panelist/participant discussions which will include opportunities for questions and answers, brainstorming, identification of concerns and research needs, and quick spot surveys. If you have a contaminated sediment site, this is the virtual workshop for you!

The fourth session will focus on long-term monitoring to determine the effectiveness of the selected remedy and to assess the ecological recovery of the sediment area. The fourth session will discuss the following topics:
  • Developing and using surface weighted average concentrations (SWAC),
  • Passive sampling to assess remedy effectiveness, and
  • Use of recently developed pore water remedial goals (PWRG) for ecological recovery monitoring at a sediment site.

FRTR Presents...Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) Emerging Characterization and Remedial Technologies, Session 2

This is part of a webinar series featuring presentations delivered at the Fall 2018 FRTR Meeting and related material. The meeting's objective was to identify and discuss the emerging science behind PFAS characterization and remedial technologies. This session will include the following topics:
  • Perfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS)—Insights on the Collection and Analysis of Environmental Samples
  • PFAS Site Characterization

Characterization and Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater in Fractured Rock with U.S. EPA & USGS: Fractured Rock 101: Focus on Characterization (Day 1)

Contaminated groundwater in fractured rock at Superfund sites poses unique challenges due to the geologically complex nature of such sites. Technological advances have led to the development of tools that aid in gaining a more robust understanding of contaminated fractured rock systems. The Technology Innovation and Field Services Division (TIFSD) in EPA Headquarters has collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to develop an EPA-specific training course that provides a state-of-the-practice overview of the characterization and remediation of contaminated groundwater in fractured rock. This training course that will improve national consistency for these complex sites and drive the development of effective characterization and remediation techniques required for their restoration.

The USGS has collaborated with EPA to develop a training course specific to EPA Region 10 (Pacific Northwest) that will highlight information requirements for characterizing the spatial distribution and fate of chlorinated solvents and their degradation products in complex fractured rock environments. The USGS has developed several workshops/training sessions for EPA in the past and these previous efforts provide the foundation for this current effort. EPA HQ and Region 10 personnel have worked closely with the USGS to ensure that Superfund specific content is included throughout the course sessions.

The two-day workshop will take place on September 11-12, 2019, at the Region 10 Office in Seattle, WA and is available to remote viewers via CLUIN.

Day 1: Fractured Rock 101: Focus on Characterization
The first day of the course will provide an overview of groundwater flow and contaminant transport processes in fractured rock environments. The focus will be on field characterization of fractured bedrock. Topics will include characterization of the hydrogeology, contaminant distribution, and transport processes and pathways in the fractured bedrock. Case studies of Region 10 (Pacific Northwest) sites will be highlighted to illustrate the characterization of groundwater contamination in fractured rock systems.

Day 2: Fractured Rock 102: Focus on Remediation
The second day of the course will focus on remediation of groundwater contamination in fractured rock systems. Case studies will illustrate multiple remedial approaches for cleaning up contamination in fractured rock systems.

Presenters will include USGS, EPA, Oregon DEQ, and industry representatives.

Characterization and Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater in Fractured Rock with U.S. EPA & USGS: Fractured Rock 102: Focus on Remediation (Day 2)

Contaminated groundwater in fractured rock at Superfund sites poses unique challenges due to the geologically complex nature of such sites. Technological advances have led to the development of tools that aid in gaining a more robust understanding of contaminated fractured rock systems. The Technology Innovation and Field Services Division (TIFSD) in EPA Headquarters has collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to develop an EPA-specific training course that provides a state-of-the-practice overview of the characterization and remediation of contaminated groundwater in fractured rock. This training course that will improve national consistency for these complex sites and drive the development of effective characterization and remediation techniques required for their restoration.

The USGS has collaborated with EPA to develop a training course specific to EPA Region 10 (Pacific Northwest) that will highlight information requirements for characterizing the spatial distribution and fate of chlorinated solvents and their degradation products in complex fractured rock environments. The USGS has developed several workshops/training sessions for EPA in the past and these previous efforts provide the foundation for this current effort. EPA HQ and Region 10 personnel have worked closely with the USGS to ensure that Superfund specific content is included throughout the course sessions.

The two-day workshop will take place on September 11-12, 2019, at the Region 10 Office in Seattle, WA and is available to remote viewers via CLUIN.

Day 1: Fractured Rock 101: Focus on Characterization
The first day of the course will provide an overview of groundwater flow and contaminant transport processes in fractured rock environments. The focus will be on field characterization of fractured bedrock. Topics will include characterization of the hydrogeology, contaminant distribution, and transport processes and pathways in the fractured bedrock. Case studies of Region 10 (Pacific Northwest) sites will be highlighted to illustrate the characterization of groundwater contamination in fractured rock systems.

Day 2: Fractured Rock 102: Focus on Remediation
The second day of the course will focus on remediation of groundwater contamination in fractured rock systems. Case studies will illustrate multiple remedial approaches for cleaning up contamination in fractured rock systems.

Presenters will include USGS, EPA, Oregon DEQ, and industry representatives.

EPA Office of Research and Development's Office of Science Policy Mine and Mineral Processing Virtual Workshop Session 1 - Site Characterization

EPA Office of Research and Development's Office of Science Policy is sponsoring a 4-part virtual workshop series to address current challenges at mining and mineral processing sites. Each virtual workshop will include a short lecture by various subject matter experts in their respective fields but will also allow ample time for the presenters to interact with the audience, including time for questions and answers as well as brainstorming and identifying concerns from stakeholders participating in each virtual workshop. If you have a mining site, this is the virtual workshop for you!

The first session will focus on site characterization. Various tools exist to help properly characterize mining sites. EPA ORD experts will provide perspective on the use of innovative technologies and approaches at mine sites, taking a wide-angle view from satellite imagery down to atomic scale tools.

EPA Office of Research and Development's Office of Science Policy Mine and Mineral Processing Virtual Workshop Session 2 - Emergency Management

EPA Office of Research and Development's Office of Science Policy is sponsoring a 4-part virtual workshop series to address current challenges at mining and mineral processing sites. Each virtual workshop will include a short lecture by various subject matter experts in their respective fields but will also allow ample time for the presenters to interact with the audience, including time for questions and answers as well as brainstorming and identifying concerns from stakeholders participating in each virtual workshop. If you have a mining site, this is the virtual workshop for you!

The second session will focus on emergency management and response actions at mine and mineral processing sites including: wildfire response and impacts to mine treatment infrastructure, response activities at Bonita Peak Mining District, uranium impacts on Navajo lands, and response elements at mineral processing sites (Mississippi Phosphates). The session will explore potential impacts in assessing risk to both human health and the environment. Speakers from various EPA Regions will discuss emergency management activities at both time-critical and non-time-critical response actions sites.

EPA Office of Research and Development's Office of Science Policy Mine and Mineral Processing Virtual Workshop Session 3 - Innovative Technologies and Strategies

EPA Office of Research and Development's Office of Science Policy is sponsoring a 4-part virtual workshop series to address current challenges at mining and mineral processing sites. Each virtual workshop will include a short lecture by various subject matter experts in their respective fields but will also allow ample time for the presenters to interact with the audience, including time for questions and answers as well as brainstorming and identifying concerns from stakeholders participating in each virtual workshop. If you have a mining site, this is the virtual workshop for you!

The third session will focus on innovative technologies and strategies available for mining sites. The session will present Superfund pilot sites that have integrated adaptive management approaches at their sites to help optimize the selected remedy and associated lessons learned. The session will also highlight recent technology advances and applications for active and passive treatment technologies at mine sites.

EPA Office of Research and Development's Office of Science Policy Mine and Mineral Processing Virtual Workshop Session 4 - Big Data

EPA Office of Research and Development's Office of Science Policy is sponsoring a 4-part virtual workshop series to address current challenges at mining and mineral processing sites. Each virtual workshop will include a short lecture by various subject matter experts in their respective fields but will also allow ample time for the presenters to interact with the audience, including time for questions and answers as well as brainstorming and identifying concerns from stakeholders participating in each virtual workshop. If you have a mining site, this is the virtual workshop for you!

The fourth session will focus on the use of big data at mining sites. Topics include new 3DVA efforts at Superfund sites; fate and transport at watershed scales; and visualization of mining data.

OBLR RE-Development Academy for Communities Webinar 1: Redevelopment Process: the Intersection of Real Estate and Brownfields

Ever wonder why some sites sit and some get developed? How brownfields issues affect developer decisions. See how the brownfield redevelopment and real estate development process intersect. Fully participate in the process and understand the key players and critical decision-making steps. Topics covered include cover basic real estate terminology, concepts, and a general overview of the development process, including the role of critical players such as the development team, the public sector, and community stakeholders. Key terminology necessary to understand the development process, including proforma, cap rates, lease rates, defining costs, and other basics of real estate development will be discussed.


This is the first webinar in a FREE webinar series for the Office of Brownfields and Land Revitalization's (OBLR) RE-Development Academy for Communities, which also includes a half-day workshop at the 2019 National Brownfields Training Conference.. Together, they comprise a single, full Academy program designed to provide community members with a general understanding of real estate and brownfields redevelopment. Each session builds on information and skills covered in each of the previous sessions in the series and a workshop at the conference where you will compete to redevelop a most valuable and complicated brownfields site. Your participation in each session will ensure you get the most out of the training.

This webinar is being offered for community members (including local governments, economic development and environmental protection departments, community nonprofits, brownfield redevelopment agencies & other local stakeholders), technical assistance providers, and state and tribal partners.

OBLR RE-Development Academy for Communities Webinar 2: Peering Into the Crystal Ball: How the Market Decides Future Use!

If you build it, they might not come. If you dream it, a developer may not be interested. This webinar will cover the basics of real estate market analysis and what drives development. Whether it's a commercial, residential, or industrial development, developers have specific criteria they are looking for. Participants will learn the difference between types of developers, basic criteria to use when evaluating development teams, and what developers look for in real estate deals. Strategies for attracting development in tough markets will be explored. The objective is to develop an understanding of how developers make decisions and how to re-position sites and neighborhoods for private investment. Participants also will learn about the latest market trends and strategies for attracting developers to tough markets.

This is the second webinar in a FREE webinar series for the Office of Brownfields and Land Revitalization's (OBLR) RE-Development Academy for Communities, which also includes a half-day workshop at the 2019 National Brownfields Training Conference. Together, they comprise a single, full Academy program designed to provide community members with a general understanding of real estate and brownfields redevelopment. Each session builds on information and skills covered in each of the previous sessions in the series and a workshop at the conference where you will compete to redevelop a most valuable and complicated brownfields site. Your participation in each session will ensure you get the most out of the training.

This webinar is being offered for community members (including local governments, economic development and environmental protection departments, community nonprofits, brownfield redevelopment agencies & other local stakeholders), technical assistance providers, and state and tribal partners.

OBLR RE-Development Academy for Communities Webinar 3: Pulling Back the Curtain: How Developers Make Money

Why does it cost so much? This webinar focuses on what goes into a real estate development project and how it is financed. We will review a proforma and discuss sources of capital, uses of funds, and expectations for profit. We will introduce how environmental issues impact the finance process and how they are addressed. The objective is to develop an understanding of what it takes to pay for a development project and what investors need to provide funds for redevelopment.

This is the third webinar in a FREE webinar series for the Office of Brownfields and Land Revitalization's (OBLR) RE-Development Academy for Communities, which also includes a half-day workshop at the 2019 National Brownfields Training Conference. Together, they comprise a single, full Academy program designed to provide community members with a general understanding of real estate and brownfields redevelopment. Each session builds on information and skills covered in each of the previous sessions in the series and a workshop at the conference where you will compete to redevelop a most valuable and complicated brownfields site. Your participation in each session will ensure you get the most out of the training.

This webinar is being offered for community members (including local governments, economic development and environmental protection departments, community nonprofits, brownfield redevelopment agencies & other local stakeholders), technical assistance providers, and state and tribal partners.

Military Munitions Support Services - CWM Response

This session will be focused on aspects of munitions response for site with hazards from chemical warfare materiel (CWM) and chemical agent. The presentations will address the differences between responses at CWM sites and conventional MEC sites, a case study for a CWM site characterization, and a review of technologies for destruction of chemical agents via treatment.
Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Characterization and remediation of contaminated groundwater in fractured rock has not been conducted or studied as broadly as groundwater at unconsolidated porous media sites. This unfamiliarity and lack of experience can make fractured rock sites perplexing. This situation is especially true in portions of the U.S. where bedrock aquifers are a primary source of drinking and process water, and demands on water are increasing. As a result, remedial activities often default to containment of contaminant plumes, point of use treatment and long-term monitoring rather than active reduction of risk. However, this attitude does not incorporate recent advances in the science and technology of fractured rock site characterization and remediation.
The basis for this training course is the ITRC guidance: Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock. The purpose of this guidance is to dispel the belief that fractured rock sites are too complex to characterize and remediate. The physical, chemical and contaminant transport concepts in fractured rock have similarities to unconsolidated porous media, yet there are important differences. These differences are the focus of this guidance.

By participating in this training class, you should learn to:
  • Use ITRC's Fractured Rock Document to guide your decision making so you can:
  • Develop quality Conceptual Site Models (CSMs) for fractured rock sites
  • Set realistic remedial objectives
  • Select the best remedial options
  • Monitor remedial progress and assess results
  • Value an interdisciplinary site team approach to bring collective expertise to improve decision making and to have confidence when going beyond containment and monitoring - - to actually remediating fractured rock sites.
Case studies of successful fractured rock remediation are presented to provide examples of how fractured rock sites can be evaluated and available tools applied to characterization and remediation.
Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock prior to attending the class.

Groundwater Statistics for Environmental Project Managers

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Statistical techniques may be used throughout the process of cleaning up contaminated groundwater. It is challenging for practitioners, who are not experts in statistics, to interpret, and use statistical techniques. ITRC developed the Technical and Regulatory Web-based Guidance on Groundwater Statistics and Monitoring Compliance (GSMC-1, 2013, http://www.itrcweb.org/gsmc-1/) and this associated training specifically for environmental project managers who review or use statistical calculations for reports, who make recommendations or decisions based on statistics, or who need to demonstrate compliance for groundwater projects. The training class will encourage and support project managers and others who are not statisticians to:

ITRC's Technical and Regulatory Web-based Guidance on Groundwater Statistics and Monitoring Compliance (GSMC-1, 2013) and this associated training bring clarity to the planning, implementation, and communication of groundwater statistical methods and should lead to greater confidence and transparency in the use of groundwater statistics for site management.

Long-term Contaminant Management Using Institutional Controls

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Institutional controls (ICs) are administrative or legal restrictions that provide protection from exposure to contaminants on a site. When ICs are jeopardized or fail, direct exposure to human health and the environment can occur. While a variety of guidance and research to date has focused on the implementation of ICs, ITRC's Long-term Contaminant Management Using Institutional Controls (IC-1, 2016) guidance and this associated training class focuses on post-implementation IC management, including monitoring, evaluation, stakeholder communications, enforcement, and termination. The ITRC guidance and training will assist those who are responsible for the management and stewardship of Ics. ITRC has developed a downloadable tool that steps users through the process of planning and designing IC management needs. This tool can help to create a long lasting record of the site that includes the regulatory authority, details of the IC, the responsibilities of all parties, a schedule for monitoring the performance of the IC, and more. The tool generates an editable Long Term Stewardship (LTS) plan in Microsoft Word.

After attending the training, participants will be able to:
  • Describe best practices and evolving trends for IC management at individual sites and across state agency programs
  • Use this guidance to
    • Improve IC reliability and prevent IC failures
    • Improve existing, or develop new, IC Management programs
    • Identify the pros and cons about differing IC management approaches
  • Use the tools to establish an LTS plan for specific sites
  • Use the elements in the tools to understand the information that should populate an IC registry or data management system.

The target audience for this guidance includes environmental regulators at all levels of government, private and public responsible or obligated parties (Ops), current site owners and operators, environmental consultants, and prospective purchasers of property and their agents. Other stakeholders who have an interest in a property can also use this guidance to help understand how to manage Ics.

TPH Risk Evaluation at Petroleum-Contaminated Sites

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Remediation at petroleum release sites is often infeasible for technical or cost reasons. Many of these sites could be depleted in typical indicator compounds, such as BTEXN, but still heavily contaminated in terms of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH). The traditional indicator compound approach for managing petroleum contaminants may not fully identify short- and long-term potential environmental concerns, can create delays in project schedules and cost overages for sub-surface utility work or redevelopment. It is important to consider a comprehensive cumulative risk-based approach to more effectively incorporate TPH data in addition to traditional BTEXN data for cleanup and long-term management decisions.

The basis for this training course is the ITRC guidance: TPH Risk Evaluation at Petroleum-Contaminated Sites (TPHRisk-1, 2018). The guidance builds on long-standing and current research and experience, and presents the current science for evaluating TPH risk at petroleum-contaminated sites. The methods and procedures to evaluate human and ecological risk and establish cleanup requirements in the various media at petroleum release sites will assist decision makers in developing and implementing a technically defensible approach. In addition, the guidance provides information and supplemental references to assist practitioners and project managers in the assessment of fate, transport, exposure, and toxicity of TPH. The guidance users will also gain information that may be used in conjunction with classic tiered approaches for risk-based decision making (ASTM 2015b, ITRC Risk 3 2015), including modifications in the assessment and remedial-decision and regulatory framework for TPH impacts through direct comparison to screening levels, site-specific modification of screening levels, and complete site-specific risk assessment for sources, receptors, and pathways, where appropriate.

The target audience for this guidance and training course is:
  • Regulators and Program Managers interested in knowing how site management decisions can influence the TPH risk evaluation process.
  • Risk assessors new to TPH data or those who want additional knowledge and training in the current methods and common practices for collecting and using TPH data in assessments to more accurately determine human health and/or ecological risks at petroleum-contaminated sites.
  • Stakeholders who are either engaged in redevelopment at former petroleum release sites or folks who are involved in community engagement and revitalization activities.
As a participant in this training you should learn to:
  • Recognize the ITRC document as a go-to resource for evaluating TPH risk at petroleum-contaminated sites
  • Recognize how TPH -impacted media interacts with the environment and changes over time
  • Select appropriate analytic method(s) to match site objectives
  • Apply the decision framework to determine when a site-specific target level may be more appropriate than a generic screening level for TPH
Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, TPH Risk Evaluation at Petroleum-Contaminated Sites (TPHRisk-1, 2018) prior to attending the class.

Issues and Options in Human Health Risk Assessment - A Resource When Alternatives to Default Parameters and Scenarios are Proposed

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Many state and local regulatory agencies responsible for the cleanup of chemicals released to the environment have adopted regulations, guidance and policies that define default approaches, scenarios, and parameters as a starting point for risk assessment and the development of risk-based screening values. Regulatory project managers and decision makers, however, may not have specific guidance when alternative approaches, scenarios, and parameters are proposed for site-specific risk assessments, and are faced with difficult technical issues when evaluating these site-specific risk assessments. This ITRC web-based document is a resource for project managers and decision makers to help evaluate alternatives to risk assessment default approaches, scenarios and parameters.

ITRC's Decision Making at Contaminated Sites: Issues and Options in Human Health Risk Assessment (RISK-3, 2015) guidance document is different from existing ITRC Risk Assessment guidance and other state and federal resources because it identifies commonly encountered issues and discusses options in risk assessment when applying site-specific alternatives to defaults. In addition, the document includes links to resources and tools that provide even more detailed information on the specific issues and potential options. The ITRC Risk Assessment Team believes that state regulatory agencies and other organizations can use the RISK-3 document as a resource or reference to supplement their existing guidance. Community members and other stakeholders also may find this document helpful in understanding and using risk assessment information.

After participating in this ITRC training course, the learner will be able to apply ITRC's Decision Making at Contaminated Sites: Issues and Options in Human Health Risk (RISK-3, 2015) document when developing or reviewing site-specific risk assessments by:
  • Identifying common issues encountered when alternatives to default parameters and scenarios are proposed during the planning, data evaluation, toxicity, exposure assessment, and risk characterization and providing possible options for addressing these issues
  • Recognizing the value of proper planning and the role of stakeholders in the development and review of risk assessments
  • Providing information (that includes links to additional resources and tools) to support decision making when alternatives to default approaches, scenarios and parameters are proposed
ITRC offers additional documents and training on risk management. ITRC's Use of Risk Assessment in Management of Contaminated Sites (RISK-2, 2008) and associated Internet-based training archive highlight variation of risk-based site management and describes how to improve the use of risk assessment for making better risk management decisions. ITRC's Examination of Risk-Based Screening Values and Approaches of Selected States (RISK-1, 2005) and associated Internet-based training archive focus on the process by which risk-based levels are derived in different states.

ITRC Panel Event: Stormwater Best Management Practices Performance Evaluation

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council ITRC Panel Event: Stormwater Best Management Practices Performance Evaluation

Are you interested in improving your stormwater best management practices (BMP) performance? Could you improve your performance evaluations on the front end with publicly available data and throughout the BMP lifecycle? If so, join us for this ITRC (Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council) interactive online panel session showcasing the ITRC Document: Stormwater Best Management Practices (BMP) Performance Evaluation (Stormwater-1) Oct-18. This panel event will provide you with:
  • Access to a centralized resource for information on stormwater BMP effectiveness
  • Guidance to use during post-construction BMP screening, selection, installation, operation, and monitoring and maintenance.
  • Case study examples using the guidance.
  • Answers to your questions about using ITRC's stormwater BMP tool and guidance
PREREQUISITE: BEFORE the event, please view the following videos EACH UNDER 5 MINUTES:
The panel session is intended to be a mix of interactive audience discussion and introductory material. Please come ready to ask questions and interact with the panel technical members.

In addition, panel participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, Stormwater Best Management Practices (BMP) Performance Evaluation (Stormwater-1) Oct-18. This guidance offers the user details on post-construction BMP lifecycle processes including contracting, cost considerations, installation factors including construction challenges, inspection checklists, quality control and record drawings. It goes on to address long-term technology- and performance-based operational strategies, including aspects such as routine and non-routine maintenance. Data and information from existing publicly available BMP performance programs has been incorporated into an online BMP Screening Tool. Using site-specific pollutant treatment requirements and installation considerations, the Tool can assist the user by identifying types of BMPs that may be appropriate for a given site. The Tool also provides users summarized information on the treatment efficiency, installation requirements and maintenance issues regarding the identified BMPs, with links to access more detailed information.

The target audience for this panel event is primarily state and local regulators during stormwater BMP screening, selection, design, installation, operation and maintenance and monitoring. Others working on post-construction stormwater management will benefit as well.

During the panel event registration process you may submit questions that may be addressed by panelist during the upcoming panel event.
The Training Exchange (Trainex)

The Training Exchange website (Trainex) is designed to provide a wide range of training information to EPA, other federal agency, state, tribal, and local staff involved in hazardous waste management and remediation. Trainex focuses on free training directed to federal and state staff. This site includes training schedules for deliveries of many courses, both classroom and Internet-based.

EPA works in partnership with organizations, such as the Interstate Technology Regulatory Council (ITRC), and other agencies, such as the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), to offer training relevant to hazardous waste remediation, site characterization, risk assessment, emergency response, site/incident management, counter-terrorism, and the community's role in site management and cleanup.

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