U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

Training & Events

Upcoming Internet Seminars
More Information

Participant Comments

CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
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Screening, Testing, and Application of Residuals and Byproducts for Remediation

This webinar in the CLU-IN mining webinar series is a follow-on to the seminar presented on July 24, 2014 on Using Biosolids and Coal Combustion Products for Soil Remediation at Mining Sites. The presenter will continue the discussion on using coal combustion products for soil remediation at mining sites, as well as discuss his recent research on screening and testing residuals, such as waste lime, gypsum, and paper mill sludge, for application on contaminated lands. Presentations will include case study data and findings that are supported by publications available from the presenter and collaborators' website www.landrehab.org.
Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


Groundwater Statistics for Environmental Project Managers

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Statistical techniques may be used throughout the process of cleaning up contaminated groundwater. It is challenging for practitioners, who are not experts in statistics, to interpret, and use statistical techniques. ITRC developed the Technical and Regulatory Web-based Guidance on Groundwater Statistics and Monitoring Compliance (GSMC-1, 2013, http://www.itrcweb.org/gsmc-1/) and this associated training specifically for environmental project managers who review or use statistical calculations for reports, who make recommendations or decisions based on statistics, or who need to demonstrate compliance for groundwater projects. The training class will encourage and support project managers and others who are not statisticians to:

ITRC's Technical and Regulatory Web-based Guidance on Groundwater Statistics and Monitoring Compliance (GSMC-1, 2013) and this associated training bring clarity to the planning, implementation, and communication of groundwater statistical methods and should lead to greater confidence and transparency in the use of groundwater statistics for site management.

An Improved Understanding of LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface - State of Science vs. State of Practice - Part 1

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) are organic liquids such as gasoline, diesel, and other petroleum hydrocarbon products that are immiscible with water and less dense than water. Understanding LNAPLs is important because they are present in the subsurface at thousands of remediation sites across the country, and are often the sole reason why a site remains "open." The spectrum of sites where LNAPL assessment and remediation efforts may take place include petroleum manufacturing and handling facilities such as refineries, bulk product terminals, gas stations, airports and military bases. LNAPLs in the subsurface can be a complex problem to address, and frequently prevent or delay regulatory closure (no further action) of remediation projects.

This training course is relevant for all levels of state and federal regulators, environmental consultants, and technically-inclined site owners and public stakeholders. The training course is divided into three parts:
  • An Improved Understanding of LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface - State of Science vs. State of Practice
  • LNAPL Characterization and Recoverability -- Improved Analysis
  • Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals
Part 1 explains how LNAPLs behave in the subsurface and examines what controls their behavior. Part 1 also explains what LNAPL data can tell you about the LNAPL and site conditions. Relevant and practical examples are used to illustrate key concepts. A sound LNAPL understanding is necessary to effectively characterize and assess LNAPL conditions and potential risks, as well as to evaluate potential remedial technologies or alternatives. Unfortunately, many environmental professionals have a faulty understanding of LNAPL conditions based on outdated paradigms. The ITRC LNAPLs Team is providing Internet-based training to improve the general understanding of LNAPLs. Better understanding leads to better decision making. Additionally, this training provides a necessary technical foundation to foster effective use of the ITRC LNAPLs Team Technical and Regulatory Guidance document, Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals (LNAPL-2, 2009).

LNAPL Characterization and Recoverability - Improved Analysis - Part 2

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) are organic liquids such as gasoline, diesel, and other petroleum hydrocarbon products that are immiscible with water and less dense than water. Understanding LNAPLs is important because they are present in the subsurface at thousands of remediation sites across the country, and are often the sole reason why a site remains "open." The spectrum of sites where LNAPL assessment and remediation efforts may take place include petroleum manufacturing and handling facilities such as refineries, bulk product terminals, gas stations, airports and military bases. LNAPLs in the subsurface can be a complex problem to address, and frequently prevent or delay regulatory closure (no further action) of remediation projects.

This training course is relevant for all levels of state and federal regulators, environmental consultants, and technically-inclined site owners and public stakeholders. The training course is divided into three parts:
  • An Improved Understanding of LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface - State of Science vs. State of Practice
  • LNAPL Characterization and Recoverability-- Improved Analysis
  • Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals
Part 2 addresses LNAPL characterization and site conceptual model development as well as LNAPL recovery evaluation and remedial considerations. Specifically, Part 2 discusses key LNAPL and site data, when and why those data may be important, and how to get those data. Part 2 also discusses how to evaluate LNAPL recoverability. A sound LNAPL understanding is necessary to effectively characterize and assess LNAPL conditions and potential risks, as well as to evaluate potential remedial technologies or alternatives. Unfortunately, many environmental professionals have a faulty understanding of LNAPL conditions based on outdated paradigms. The ITRC LNAPLs Team is providing Internet-based training to improve the general understanding of LNAPLs. Better understanding leads to better decision making. Additionally, this training provides a necessary technical foundation to foster effective use of the ITRC LNAPLs Team Technical and Regulatory Guidance document, Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals (LNAPL-2, 2009).

Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals - Part 3

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) are organic liquids such as gasoline, diesel, and other petroleum hydrocarbon products that are immiscible with water and less dense than water. Understanding LNAPLs is important because they are present in the subsurface at thousands of remediation sites across the country and are often the sole reason why a site remains open. The spectrum of sites where LNAPL assessment and remediation efforts may take place include petroleum manufacturing and handling facilities such as refineries, bulk product terminals, gas stations, airports and military bases. LNAPLs in the subsurface can be a complex problem to address, and frequently prevent or delay regulatory closure (no further action) of remediation projects.

Over the past few decades, LNAPL remedial technologies have evolved from conventional pumping or hydraulic recovery systems to a variety of innovative, aggressive, and experimental technologies that address the mobile and residual LNAPL fractions, as well as volatile and dissolved-phase plumes. Thus, many different LNAPL remedial technologies with differing site and LNAPL applicabilities and capabilities are available to remediate LNAPL releases. This can make selection of a remedial technology daunting and inefficient. To foster informed remedial technology selection and appropriate technology application, the LNAPLs Team developed the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance document, Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals (LNAPL-2, 2009). This document addresses seventeen LNAPL remedial technologies and provides a framework to streamline remedial technology evaluation and selection.

This training course is relevant for new and veteran regulators, environmental consultants, and technically-inclined site owners and public stakeholders. The training course is divided into three parts:
  • Part 1: An Improved Understanding of LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface - State of Science vs. State of Practice
  • Part 2: LNAPL Characterization and Recoverability - Improved Analysis
  • Part 3: Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals
Part 3 uses the LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM) approach to identify the LNAPL concerns or risks and set proper LNAPL remedial objectives and technology-specific remediation goals and performance metrics. The training course also provides an overview of the LNAPL remedial technology selection framework. The framework uses a series of tools to screen the seventeen remedial technologies based on site and LNAPL conditions and other important factors. LNAPL Training Part 1 and LNAPL Training 2 are recommended pre-requisites for this Part 3 training course. Archives are available at http://cluin.org/live/archive.cfm?sort=title#itrc (note: courses are listed alphabetically, you will have to scroll down to find the course of interest).
The Training Exchange (Trainex)

The Training Exchange website (Trainex) is designed to provide a wide range of training information to EPA, other federal agency, state, tribal, and local staff involved in hazardous waste management and remediation. Trainex focuses on free training directed to federal and state staff. This site includes training schedules for deliveries of many courses, both classroom and Internet-based.

EPA works in partnership with organizations, such as the Interstate Technology Regulatory Council (ITRC), and other agencies, such as the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), to offer training relevant to hazardous waste remediation, site characterization, risk assessment, emergency response, site/incident management, counter-terrorism, and the community's role in site management and cleanup.

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