U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

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CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
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Superfund Redevelopment Initiative Series Webinar Rescheduled for May 15

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Filing EPA Information in AES Targeted at Current Exporters Only

Exporters of manifested hazardous wastes, spent/used lead-acid batteries, universal wastes and cathode ray tubes for recycling should now be transitioning to an electronic border process using the Automated Export System (AES) or AESDirect. This 30-minute webinar will provide detailed filing instructions for exporters and their authorized filing agents (e.g., customs brokers) on how to file the RCRA information about their shipments in AES and AESDirect.

Filing EPA Information in AES Targeted at Current Exporters Only

Exporters of manifested hazardous wastes, spent/used lead-acid batteries, universal wastes and cathode ray tubes for recycling should now be transitioning to an electronic border process using the Automated Export System (AES) or AESDirect. This 30-minute webinar will provide detailed filing instructions for exporters and their authorized filing agents (e.g., customs brokers) on how to file the RCRA information about their shipments in AES and AESDirect.

Requirements That Apply to Import and Export Shipments That Go to Both an Interim and Final Destination Facility

Exports and imports of hazardous wastes, including those managed as universal waste and spent lead-acid batteries, are required to follow import and export procedures under 40 CFR Part 262 Subpart H. But shipments going first to an interim facility for temporary holding or consolidation prior to being shipped to a final disposal or recycling facility have special procedures to follow. This 1-hr webinar will walk through the additional information to provide in your notices and the shipment-specific tracking procedures you must follow to comply with 40 CFR Part 262 Subpart H.

OSC Academy Presents...ESA and NHPA for OSCs and RPMs

The course provides OSCs and RPMs with an overview of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and Section 7 requirements under EPA's Emergency Response and Removal Program, including a discussion of the responsibility to consider the effects of its actions on listed species and their habitat and the components of Section 7 consultation.

The course also provides OSCs and RPMs with an overview of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) and Section 106 requirements under EPA's Emergency Response and Removal Program, including a discussion of its responsibility to consider the effects of its undertakings on historic properties and the components of Section 106 review.

The primary audience for this training is EPA OSCs and RPMs; however, it is open to other federal agencies, states, tribes and consultants who are interested in learning more about the ESA and NHPA statutes.

Superfund Redevelopment Initiative Series: Restoring Superfund Sites to Public Good

Superfund sites can be reused in many ways, but many local governments are seeing unique opportunities to use sites for public or local government purposes. From roads to firefighting training facilities, local governments who own or acquire Superfund sites are finding ways to put these properties to good use.

Superfund Redevelopment Initiative Series: Opportunities for Reuse at Capped Sites

Former landfills, abandoned dumps, and other contaminated sites throughout the United States, once thought to be of limited value, are being transformed into viable commercial and industrial developments, parks and other recreational areas, and wildlife areas. With forethought and effective planning, communities and site stakeholders can return sites to productive use without jeopardizing the effectiveness of a remedial cap. This webinar will share lessons learned from the successful reuse and assessment of capped sites.

Superfund Redevelopment Initiative Series: Highlighting Beneficial Economic Impacts at Superfund Sites

Site redevelopment can revitalize a local economy with jobs, new businesses, tax revenues and local spending. This webinar will showcase new economic case studies across the country with different types of development- large and small, commercial and public, even new transportation options to show how they can all have beneficial impacts on the surrounding community.

Military Munitions Support Services - Stakeholder Collaboration on MMRP Projects

This session will discuss challenges and successes of interagency collaborative efforts on munitions response projects.

Military Munitions Support Services - Making Decisions

This session will discuss critical elements and concepts of the decision making process.

Military Munitions Support Services - MMRP Explosive Safety

This session will discuss updated safety developments when dealing with scrappers, underwater issues and the 3 R's.

Overview, Lessons Learned and Best Practices Derived from Independent Optimization Reviews of Superfund Mining Sites

This webinar presents an overview of the EPA Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI) "Mine Site Optimization Initiative," and summarizes the lessons learned identified and best practices derived from independent optimization reviews performed on over 30 Superfund mine sites and mining district sites nationwide. The initiative is being performed under the EPA's National Strategy to Expand Superfund Optimization Practices from Site Assessment to Site Completion, which expanded and formalized optimization practices as an operating business model for the Superfund remedial program. The webinar will present case studies of mine site reviews performed, a summary of specific lessons learned identified for site characterization, and an update on the development of best practices resources to support consistent and safe approaches to characterization of mine sites with the potential for sudden, uncontrolled release of mining-influenced waters.

Analytical Tools and Methods: Session II - Techniques for Trace Analysis of Metals and Chemical Metabolites

This webinar series highlights innovative analytical tools and methods developed and used by Superfund Research Program (SRP) grantees. The presenters will feature the benefits of these new tools and methods compared to conventional methods. They also will include information about how the technology has helped to facilitate ongoing SRP research.

During the second session of the series, speakers will highlight techniques that help measure trace levels of metals and chemical metabolites to better understand environmentally relevant chemical exposures.

Tracy Punshon, Ph.D., a research assistant professor at Dartmouth College, will introduce and translate the technology of elemental mapping, or spatially resolved elemental analysis. She will provide several examples of the instruments used to collect elemental maps, show examples of how the technique is being applied in the biological and environmental sciences, and provide information on accessibility and support for those interested in using it in their research.

Bruce Buchholz, Ph.D., a research scientist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, will describe Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), a technique for measuring zeptomole to femtomole quantities of carbon-14 in sub milligram sized samples. The technique is used to quantify metabolism of chemicals at relevant exposures in animals and humans, such as dermal exposure to pesticides and ingestion of PAHs or antimicrobials. The metabolism studies have become more streamlined recently with the addition of an integrated HPLC-AMS-MS system and can identify dominant metabolites at relevant doses from which specific field assays can be developed without the use of the carbon-14 label. All tissues, blood, urine, saliva, or purified biomolecules (protein, DNA, RNA) are amenable to AMS analyses.

Lee Ferguson, Ph.D., an associate professor at Duke University, will discuss his work focused on the development of novel methods for trace analysis of emerging contaminants in water.

Analytical Tools and Methods: Session III - Fate and Transport of Contaminants

This webinar series highlights innovative analytical tools and methods developed and used by Superfund Research Program (SRP) grantees. During the third session of the series, speakers will highlight tools and methods to detect contaminants and measure their fate and transport in the environment, including work related to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), and chlorinated volatile organic contaminants in the environment. Presenters include: Keri Hornbuckle, Ph.D., University of Iowa SRP Center; Jennifer Guelfo, Ph.D., Brown University SRP Center; and Mark Brusseau, Ph.D., University of Arizona SRP Center.
Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


An Improved Understanding of LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface - State of Science vs. State of Practice - Part 1

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) are organic liquids such as gasoline, diesel, and other petroleum hydrocarbon products that are immiscible with water and less dense than water. Understanding LNAPLs is important because they are present in the subsurface at thousands of remediation sites across the country, and are often the sole reason why a site remains "open." The spectrum of sites where LNAPL assessment and remediation efforts may take place include petroleum manufacturing and handling facilities such as refineries, bulk product terminals, gas stations, airports and military bases. LNAPLs in the subsurface can be a complex problem to address, and frequently prevent or delay regulatory closure (no further action) of remediation projects.

This training course is relevant for all levels of state and federal regulators, environmental consultants, and technically-inclined site owners and public stakeholders. The training course is divided into three parts:
  • An Improved Understanding of LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface - State of Science vs. State of Practice
  • LNAPL Characterization and Recoverability -- Improved Analysis
  • Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals
Part 1 explains how LNAPLs behave in the subsurface and examines what controls their behavior. Part 1 also explains what LNAPL data can tell you about the LNAPL and site conditions. Relevant and practical examples are used to illustrate key concepts. A sound LNAPL understanding is necessary to effectively characterize and assess LNAPL conditions and potential risks, as well as to evaluate potential remedial technologies or alternatives. Unfortunately, many environmental professionals have a faulty understanding of LNAPL conditions based on outdated paradigms. The ITRC LNAPLs Team is providing Internet-based training to improve the general understanding of LNAPLs. Better understanding leads to better decision making. Additionally, this training provides a necessary technical foundation to foster effective use of the ITRC LNAPLs Team Technical and Regulatory Guidance document, Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals (LNAPL-2, 2009).

Long-term Contaminant Management Using Institutional Controls

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Institutional controls (ICs) are administrative or legal restrictions that provide protection from exposure to contaminants on a site. When ICs are jeopardized or fail, direct exposure to human health and the environment can occur. While a variety of guidance and research to date has focused on the implementation of ICs, ITRCís Long-term Contaminant Management Using Institutional Controls (IC-1, 2016) guidance and this associated training class focuses on post-implementation IC management, including monitoring, evaluation, stakeholder communications, enforcement, and termination. The ITRC guidance and training will assist those who are responsible for the management and stewardship of Ics. ITRC has developed a downloadable tool that steps users through the process of planning and designing IC management needs. This tool can help to create a long lasting record of the site that includes the regulatory authority, details of the IC, the responsibilities of all parties, a schedule for monitoring the performance of the IC, and more. The tool generates an editable Long Term Stewardship (LTS) plan in Microsoft Word.

After attending the training, participants will be able to:
  • Describe best practices and evolving trends for IC management at individual sites and across state agency programs
  • Use this guidance to
    • Improve IC reliability and prevent IC failures
    • Improve existing, or develop new, IC Management programs
    • Identify the pros and cons about differing IC management approaches
  • Use the tools to establish an LTS plan for specific sites
  • Use the elements in the tools to understand the information that should populate an IC registry or data management system.

The target audience for this guidance includes environmental regulators at all levels of government, private and public responsible or obligated parties (Ops), current site owners and operators, environmental consultants, and prospective purchasers of property and their agents. Other stakeholders who have an interest in a property can also use this guidance to help understand how to manage Ics.

LNAPL Characterization and Recoverability - Improved Analysis - Part 2

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) are organic liquids such as gasoline, diesel, and other petroleum hydrocarbon products that are immiscible with water and less dense than water. Understanding LNAPLs is important because they are present in the subsurface at thousands of remediation sites across the country, and are often the sole reason why a site remains "open." The spectrum of sites where LNAPL assessment and remediation efforts may take place include petroleum manufacturing and handling facilities such as refineries, bulk product terminals, gas stations, airports and military bases. LNAPLs in the subsurface can be a complex problem to address, and frequently prevent or delay regulatory closure (no further action) of remediation projects.

This training course is relevant for all levels of state and federal regulators, environmental consultants, and technically-inclined site owners and public stakeholders. The training course is divided into three parts:
  • An Improved Understanding of LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface - State of Science vs. State of Practice
  • LNAPL Characterization and Recoverability-- Improved Analysis
  • Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals
Part 2 addresses LNAPL characterization and site conceptual model development as well as LNAPL recovery evaluation and remedial considerations. Specifically, Part 2 discusses key LNAPL and site data, when and why those data may be important, and how to get those data. Part 2 also discusses how to evaluate LNAPL recoverability. A sound LNAPL understanding is necessary to effectively characterize and assess LNAPL conditions and potential risks, as well as to evaluate potential remedial technologies or alternatives. Unfortunately, many environmental professionals have a faulty understanding of LNAPL conditions based on outdated paradigms. The ITRC LNAPLs Team is providing Internet-based training to improve the general understanding of LNAPLs. Better understanding leads to better decision making. Additionally, this training provides a necessary technical foundation to foster effective use of the ITRC LNAPLs Team Technical and Regulatory Guidance document, Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals (LNAPL-2, 2009).

Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals - Part 3

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) are organic liquids such as gasoline, diesel, and other petroleum hydrocarbon products that are immiscible with water and less dense than water. Understanding LNAPLs is important because they are present in the subsurface at thousands of remediation sites across the country and are often the sole reason why a site remains open. The spectrum of sites where LNAPL assessment and remediation efforts may take place include petroleum manufacturing and handling facilities such as refineries, bulk product terminals, gas stations, airports and military bases. LNAPLs in the subsurface can be a complex problem to address, and frequently prevent or delay regulatory closure (no further action) of remediation projects.

Over the past few decades, LNAPL remedial technologies have evolved from conventional pumping or hydraulic recovery systems to a variety of innovative, aggressive, and experimental technologies that address the mobile and residual LNAPL fractions, as well as volatile and dissolved-phase plumes. Thus, many different LNAPL remedial technologies with differing site and LNAPL applicabilities and capabilities are available to remediate LNAPL releases. This can make selection of a remedial technology daunting and inefficient. To foster informed remedial technology selection and appropriate technology application, the LNAPLs Team developed the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance document, Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals (LNAPL-2, 2009). This document addresses seventeen LNAPL remedial technologies and provides a framework to streamline remedial technology evaluation and selection.

This training course is relevant for new and veteran regulators, environmental consultants, and technically-inclined site owners and public stakeholders. The training course is divided into three parts:
  • Part 1: An Improved Understanding of LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface - State of Science vs. State of Practice
  • Part 2: LNAPL Characterization and Recoverability - Improved Analysis
  • Part 3: Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals
Part 3 uses the LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM) approach to identify the LNAPL concerns or risks and set proper LNAPL remedial objectives and technology-specific remediation goals and performance metrics. The training course also provides an overview of the LNAPL remedial technology selection framework. The framework uses a series of tools to screen the seventeen remedial technologies based on site and LNAPL conditions and other important factors. LNAPL Training Part 1 and LNAPL Training 2 are recommended pre-requisites for this Part 3 training course. Archives are available at http://cluin.org/live/archive.cfm?sort=title#itrc (note: courses are listed alphabetically, you will have to scroll down to find the course of interest).

Issues and Options in Human Health Risk Assessment - A Resource When Alternatives to Default Parameters and Scenarios are Proposed

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Many state and local regulatory agencies responsible for the cleanup of chemicals released to the environment have adopted regulations, guidance and policies that define default approaches, scenarios, and parameters as a starting point for risk assessment and the development of risk-based screening values. Regulatory project managers and decision makers, however, may not have specific guidance when alternative approaches, scenarios, and parameters are proposed for site-specific risk assessments, and are faced with difficult technical issues when evaluating these site-specific risk assessments. This ITRC web-based document is a resource for project managers and decision makers to help evaluate alternatives to risk assessment default approaches, scenarios and parameters.

ITRC's Decision Making at Contaminated Sites: Issues and Options in Human Health Risk Assessment (RISK-3, 2015) guidance document is different from existing ITRC Risk Assessment guidance and other state and federal resources because it identifies commonly encountered issues and discusses options in risk assessment when applying site-specific alternatives to defaults. In addition, the document includes links to resources and tools that provide even more detailed information on the specific issues and potential options. The ITRC Risk Assessment Team believes that state regulatory agencies and other organizations can use the RISK-3 document as a resource or reference to supplement their existing guidance. Community members and other stakeholders also may find this document helpful in understanding and using risk assessment information.

After participating in this ITRC training course, the learner will be able to apply ITRC's Decision Making at Contaminated Sites: Issues and Options in Human Health Risk (RISK-3, 2015) document when developing or reviewing site-specific risk assessments by:
  • Identifying common issues encountered when alternatives to default parameters and scenarios are proposed during the planning, data evaluation, toxicity, exposure assessment, and risk characterization and providing possible options for addressing these issues
  • Recognizing the value of proper planning and the role of stakeholders in the development and review of risk assessments
  • Providing information (that includes links to additional resources and tools) to support decision making when alternatives to default approaches, scenarios and parameters are proposed
ITRC offers additional documents and training on risk management. ITRC's Use of Risk Assessment in Management of Contaminated Sites (RISK-2, 2008) and associated Internet-based training archive highlight variation of risk-based site management and describes how to improve the use of risk assessment for making better risk management decisions. ITRC's Examination of Risk-Based Screening Values and Approaches of Selected States (RISK-1, 2005) and associated Internet-based training archive focus on the process by which risk-based levels are derived in different states.

Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Sites contaminated with dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) and DNAPL mixtures present significant environmental challenges. Despite the decades spent on characterizing and attempting to remediate DNAPL sites, substantial risk remains. Inadequate characterization of site geology as well as the distribution, characteristics, and behavior of contaminants -- by relying on traditional monitoring well methods rather than more innovative and integrated approaches -- has limited the success of many remediation efforts.

The Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization Team has synthesized the knowledge about DNAPL site characterization and remediation acquired over the past several decades, and has integrated that information into a new document, Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization and Tools Selection (ISC-1, 2015). This guidance is a resource to inform regulators, responsible parties, other problem holders, consultants, community stakeholders, and other interested parties of the critical concepts related to characterization approaches and tools for collecting subsurface data at DNAPL sites. After this associated training, participants will be able to use the ITRC Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization and Tools Selection (ISC-1, 2015) guidance to develop and support an integrated approach to DNAPL site characterization, including:
  • Identify what site conditions must be considered when developing an informative DNAPL conceptual site model (CSM)
  • Define an objectives-based DNAPL characterization strategy
  • Understand what tools and resources are available to improve the identification, collection, and evaluation of appropriate site characterization data
  • Navigate the DNAPL characterization tools table and select appropriate technologies to fill site-specific data gaps
For reference during the training class, participants should have a copy of Figure 4-1, the integrated site characterization flow diagram from the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance document: Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization and Tools Selection (ISC-1, 2015) and available as a PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/IDSC/ITRC-ISC-Figures.pdf
.