U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

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CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
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2018 BUILD Act & the EPA Brownfields Program

The Brownfields Utilization, Investment, and Local Development Act (BUILD Act) was enacted as part of the FY18 Omnibus Appropriations Act. The BUILD Act amends the 2002 Brownfields Law and authorizes changes to EPA's Brownfields program.

Members from EPA's Brownfields and Land Revitalization Program will provide an overview of how the BUILD Act changes some aspects of EPAís brownfields grants, ownership and liability requirements, and State & Tribal Response Programs.

Perspectives on the Implementation of Greener Cleanups

The practice of implementing greener cleanups to secure protective remedies with a lower environmental footprint continues to mature and expand, with greater levels of experience among regulators, site owners, and cleanup professionals alike. Through this webinar we will hear first-hand from individuals in all three sectors on their experiences with actual sites where greener cleanups have been implemented., Three of the projects applied the ASTM Standard Guide for Greener Cleanups (E2893), and represent three major federal agencies involved in site cleanups. We will also learn how greener cleanups are implemented by a corporation owning a portfolio of sites requiring remediation work.

New Approaches and Alternatives for Toxicity Testing: Session III - Modernizing Safety Testing

The NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) is hosting a Risk eLearning webinar series highlighting research that may be useful as new approaches and methodologies for evaluating the safety of chemicals. In the third session, presenters will discuss new and emerging strategies for chemical safety evaluation. This will include new and emerging in vivo, in vitro, and in silico models to address population variability, and how in vitro high-throughput assays can provide useful information for hazard assessment of complex mixtures.

This series coincides with recent initiatives found in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's New Draft Strategic Plan and the National Toxicology Programís Strategic Roadmap.

Practical Applications of Phytotechnologies at Contaminated Sites

Phytoremediation is the practice of using plants to mitigate environmental contamination and reduce exposure humans and ecological receptors to that contamination. This webinar will introduce participants to the science of phytotechnology in the context of contaminated site remediation. Technical experts will discuss the practical aspects of phytoremediation and explore opportunities where the use of plants could be integrated as part of a remedial approach. The webinar will discuss the considerations and future of phytotechnology at contaminated sites and share additional resources. Participants will have a better understanding for evaluating phytoremediation as a remedial approach for contaminated sites.

Military Munitions Support Services - The Application of Innovative Technologies to MMRP Projects

This session will include a series of presentations on the application of innovative technologies to Military Munitions Response Program (MMRP) projects including: Robotics for Vegetation Clearance, Rapid Chemical Destruction of Bulk and Residual Energetics and Smart Characterization — An HRSC Approach for Determining Preferential Pathways for Complex Sites.
Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


Geospatial Analysis for Optimization at Environmental Sites

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Optimization activities can improve performance, increase monitoring efficiency, and support contaminated site decisions. Project managers can use geospatial analysis for evaluation of optimization opportunities. Unlike traditional statistical analysis, geospatial methods incorporate the spatial and temporal dependence between nearby data points, which is an important feature of almost all data collected as part of an environmental investigation. The results of geospatial analyses add additional lines of evidence to decision making in optimization opportunities in environmental sites across all project life cycle stages (release detection, site characterization, remediation, monitoring and closure) in soil, groundwater or sediment remediation projects for different sizes and types of sites.

The purpose of ITRC's Geospatial Analysis for Optimization at Environmental Sites (GRO-1) guidance document and this associated training is to explain, educate, and train state regulators and other practitioners in understanding and using geospatial analyses to evaluate optimization opportunities at environmental sites. With the ITRC GRO-1 web-based guidance document and this associated training class, project managers will be able to:
  • Evaluate available data and site needs to determine if geospatial analyses are appropriate for a given site
  • For a project and specific lifecycle stage, identify optimization questions where geospatial methods can contribution to better decision making
  • For a project and optimization question(s), select appropriate geospatial method(s) and software using the geospatial analysis work flow, tables and flow charts in the guidance document
  • With geospatial analyses results (note: some geospatial analyses may be performed by the project manager, but many geospatial analyses will be performed by technical experts), explain what the results mean and appropriately apply in decision making
  • Use the project managerís tool box, interactive flow charts for choosing geospatial methods and review checklist to use geospatial analyses confidently in decision making

Remediation Management of Complex Sites

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council At some sites, complex site-specific conditions make it difficult to fully remediate environmental contamination. Both technical and nontechnical challenges can impede remediation and may prevent a site from achieving federal- and state-mandated regulatory cleanup goals within a reasonable time frame. For example, technical challenges may include geologic, hydrogeologic, geochemical, and contaminant-related conditions as well as large-scale or surface conditions. In addition, nontechnical challenges may also play a role such as managing changes that occur over long time frames, overlapping regulatory and financial responsibilities between agencies, setting achievable site objectives, maintaining effective institutional controls, redevelopment and changes in land use, and funding considerations.
This training course and associated ITRC guidance: Remediation Management of Complex Sites (RMCS-1, 2017), provide a recommended holistic process for management of challenging sites, termed ďadaptive site management.Ē This process is a comprehensive, flexible, and iterative process that is well-suited for sites where there is significant uncertainty in remedy performance predictions. Adaptive site management includes the establishment of interim objectives and long-term site objectives that consider both technical and nontechnical challenges. Periodic adjustment of the remedial approach may involve multiple technologies at any one time and changes in technologies over time. Comprehensive planning and scheduled evaluations of remedy performance help decision makers track remedy progress and improve the timeliness of remedy optimization, reevaluations, or transition to other technologies/contingency actions.
By participating in this training course we expect you will learn to apply the ITRC guidance document to:
  • Identify and integrate technical and nontechnical challenges into a holistic approach to remediation
  • Use the Remediation Potential Assessment to identify whether adaptive site management is warranted due to site complexity
  • Understand and apply adaptive site management principles
  • Develop a long-term performance-based action plan
  • Apply well-demonstrated techniques for effective stakeholder engagement
  • Access additional resources, tools, and case studies most relevant for complex sites
  • Communicate the value of the guidance to regulators, practitioners, community members, and others
Ultimately, using the guidance that can lead to better decision making and remediation management at complex sites. The guidance is intended to benefit a variety of site decision makers, including regulators, responsible parties and their consultants, and public and tribal stakeholders.
Case studies are used to describe real-world applications of remediation and remediation management at complex sites. Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance Remediation Management of Complex Sites (RMCS-1, 2017) prior to attending the class.