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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

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CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
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Plume Stability Analyses with GWSDAT

The GroundWater Spatiotemporal Data Analysis Tool (GWSDAT) is a user friendly, open source, decision support tool for the analysis and reporting of groundwater monitoring data. Uniquely, GWSDAT applies a spatiotemporal model smoother for a more coherent interpretation of the interaction in spatial and time-series components of groundwater solute concentrations. This provides a more data efficient method for evaluating and determining contaminant plume stability. New in the latest version (v3.1) is the ability to perform well redundancy analysis by allowing the user to drop a well or a combination of wells from the analysis and investigate the resultant impact, including comparison to full dataset. More information and access to this tool can be found at http://gwsdat.net/

Risk e-Learning Webinar Series: Session III - Integrating Omics Data Across Model Organisms and Populations

The NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) is hosting a Risk e-Learning webinar series focused on SRP-funded data science projects that are enhancing the integration, interoperability, and reuse of data. With these supplements, the SRP encourages data sharing among its grantees to accelerate scientific discoveries, stimulate new collaborations, and increase scientific transparency and rigor.

The third and final session will feature SRP-funded researchers collaborating to combine omics (e.g., genomics, proteomics) data within and across model organisms as well as studies in human populations. We will also hear from The Global Alliance for Genomics and Health about their work to incorporate semantic data models for sharing of genomic data to align with environmental health research.

Ecosystem Services - Benefits and Considerations for the Cleanup of Contaminated Mine Sites

One way to characterize and improve the benefits of environmental cleanups is to use concepts of "ecosystem services", those benefits that nature contributes to human health and well-being. Join us to learn about how we may consider ecosystem services in cleanup of contaminated site cleanups. This two-part webinar will first introduce ecosystem services concepts from a contaminate site cleanup perspective and discuss ongoing efforts at EPA to connect ecosystem services concepts, tools, and frameworks to different aspects of cleanups. The second part will introduce examples of mine cleanups that have elements relevant to ecosystem services with an overall goal to tee up innovative ideas for characterizing and improving the benefits of environmental cleanups. Overall, an understanding of ecosystem services concepts can be helpful to ecological risk assessors and cleanup project managers working on sites looking for enhancing environmental benefits in their projects.

Community Reuse of Superfund sites - EPA Region 4 Spotlight

Community reuse of formerly contaminated land provides stakeholders with unique opportunities to create a positive impact on their neighborhood. This webinar will highlight the innovative community reuse of the Brown's Dump site, where the Clara White Mission operates a teaching farm, providing environmental education projects, job training, an on-site farmers market and fresh produce for Mission's programs to feed homeless and other disadvantaged community members. Stakeholders will learn how the site is part of a multi-site community empowerment and planning effort seeking to address environmental justice challenges through equitable redevelopment in Jacksonville, Florida.
Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


1,4-Dioxane: Science, Characterization & Analysis, and Remediation

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council 1,4-Dioxane has seen widespread use as a solvent stabilizer since the 1950s. The widespread use of solvents through the 1980s suggests its presence at thousands of solvent sites in the US; however, it is not always a standard compound in typical analytical suites for hazardous waste sites, so it previously was overlooked. The U.S. EPA has classified 1,4-dioxane as "likely to be carcinogenic to humans." Some states have devised health standards or regulatory guidelines for drinking water and groundwater standards; these are often sub-part per billion values. These low standards present challenges for analysis, characterization, and remediation of 1,4-dioxane. The ITRC team created multiple tools and documents that provide information to assist all interested stakeholders in understanding this contaminate and for making informed, educated decisions.

The 1,4-Dioxane: Science, Characterization & Analysis, and Remediation training is a series of six (6) modules. The six individual modules will be presented together live, and then archived on the ITRC 1,4-Dioxane training webpage for on demand listening.

The modular 1,4-Dioxane training series provides an overview of 1,4-dioxane and presenting six sections from the ITRC guidance document (1,4d-1, 2021):
  • History of Use and Potential Sources (Sect 1)
  • Regulatory Framework (Sect 2)
  • Fate and Transport (Sect 3)
  • Sampling and Analysis (Sect 4)
  • Toxicity and Risk Assessment (Sect 5)
  • Remediation and Treatment Technologies (Sect 6)
After the six-part 1,4-Dioxane: Science, Characterization & Analysis, and Remediation series, you should understand:
  • The history of 1,4-dioxane manufacturing and usage and the potential sources of releases of 1,4-dioxane to the environment.
  • Primary state and U.S. federal regulatory programs of relevance to 1,4-dioxane
  • Key physical/chemical properties, and fate and transport processes that are relevant for 1,4-dioxane
  • Benefits and limitations of the available analytical methods
  • Risk drivers for human health and how ecological risk compares
  • How/when/why different treatment technologies are appropriate

We encourage you to use the ITRC 1,4-Dioxane products (14d-1) and these training modules to learn about 1,4-dioxane and how you can apply these best practices to improve decision-making at your sites.
For regulators and other government agency staff, this understanding of 1,4-dioxane can be incorporated into your own programs. This training summarizes the current understanding of 1,4-dioxane. While the training makes every effort to keep the information accessible to a wide audience, it is assumed that the participants will have some basic technical understanding of chemistry, environmental sciences, and risk assessment. As with other emerging contaminants, our understanding of 1,4-dioxane continues to advance. This training provides the participants with information on areas where the science is evolving and where uncertainty persists.

Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soil: Considerations for Human Health Risk Assessment

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Risk-based cleanup goals are often calculated assuming that chemicals present in soil are absorbed by humans as efficiently as the chemicals dosed during the toxicity tests used to determine regulatory toxicity values (such as the Reference Dose or Cancer Slope Factor). This assumption can result in inaccurate exposure estimates and associated risks for some contaminated sites because the amount of a chemical absorbed (the chemical's bioavailability) from contaminated soil can be a fraction of the total amount present. Properly accounting for soil-chemical interactions on the bioavailability of chemicals from soil can lead to more accurate estimates of exposures to soil contaminants and improve risk assessments by decreasing uncertainty.
The basis for this training course is the ITRC guidance: Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soil: Considerations for Human Health Risk Assessment (BCS-1). This guidance describes the general concepts of the bioavailability of contaminants in soil, reviews the state of the science, and discusses how to incorporate bioavailability into the human health risk assessment process. This guidance addresses lead, arsenic, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) because evaluating bioavailability is better understood for these chemicals than for others, particularly for the incidental ingestion of soil.
The target audience for this guidance and training course are:
  • Project managers interested in decreasing uncertainty in the risk assessment which may lead to reduced remedial action costs.
  • Risk assessors new to bioavailability or those who want additional confidence and training in the current methods and common practices for using bioavailability assessment to more accurately determine human health risk at a contaminated site.

As a participant in this training you should learn to:
  • Value the ITRC document as a "go-to" resource for soil bioavailability
  • Apply the decision process to determine when a site-specific bioavailability assessment may be appropriate
  • Use the ITRC Review Checklist to develop or review a risk assessment that includes soil bioavailability
  • Consider factors that affect arsenic, lead and PAH bioavailability
  • Select appropriate methods to evaluate soil bioavailability
  • Use tools to develop site-specific soil bioavailability estimates and incorporate them into human health risk assessment

Learners can envision themselves implementing the ITRC guidance through case study applications. Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soil: Considerations for Human Health Risk Assessment (BCS-1) prior to attending the class.

Vapor Intrusion Mitigation (VIM-1)

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council When certain contaminants or hazardous substances are released into the soil or groundwater, they may volatilize into soil gas. Vapor intrusion (VI) occurs when these vapors migrate up into overlying buildings and contaminate indoor air. ITRC has previously released guidance documents focused on VI, including the "Vapor Intrusion Pathway: A Practical Guidance" (VI-1, 2007) and "Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management" (PVI, 2014). However, ITRC has received multiple requests for additional details and training on mitigation strategies for addressing this exposure pathway.

The ITRC Vapor Intrusion Mitigation Team (VIMT) created ten fact sheets, 16 technology information sheets, and 4 checklists with the goal of assisting regulators during review of vapor intrusion mitigation systems, and helping contractors understand the essential elements of planning, design, implementation, and operation, maintenance and monitoring (OM&M) of mitigation systems.

The Vapor Intrusion Mitigation training is a series of eight (8) modules, presented over two sessions as noted in the graphic below.

The Vapor Intrusion Mitigation training series provides an overview of vapor intrusion mitigation and presenting information from the ITRC fact sheets, technology information sheets, and checklists (VIM-1, 2021):
  • Introduction & Overview of Vapor Intrusion Mitigation Training Team
  • Conceptual Site Models for Vapor Intrusion Mitigation
  • Public Outreach During Vapor Intrusion Mitigation
  • Rapid Response & Ventilation for Vapor Intrusion Mitigation
  • Active Mitigation Approaches
  • Passive Mitigation Approaches
  • System Verification, OM&M, and Exit Strategies
  • Remediation & Institutional Controls

After the Vapor Intrusion Mitigation series, you should understand:
  • How to locate and utilize the VIM-1 fact sheets, technology information sheets, and checklists
  • The importance of a VI mitigation conceptual site model
  • How public outreach for VI mitigation differs from other environmental matters
  • When to implement rapid response for vapor intrusion and applicable methodologies
  • The differences between remediation, mitigation, and institutional controls
  • Available technologies for active and passive mitigation, and design considerations for various approaches
  • How/when/why different mitigation technologies are appropriate
  • How to verify mitigation system success, address underperformance, and develop a plan for discontinuing a mitigation system

We encourage you to use the ITRC Vapor Intrusion Mitigation work products (VIM-1) and these training modules to learn about vapor intrusion mitigation and how you can apply these best practices to improve decision-making at your sites. For regulators and other government agency staff, this understanding of vapor intrusion mitigation can be incorporated into your own programs.

While the training makes every effort to keep the information accessible to a wide audience, it is assumed that the participants will have some basic technical understanding of chemistry, environmental sciences, and risk assessment. As with other emerging contaminants, our understanding of vapor intrusion mitigation continues to advance. This training provides the participants with information on areas where the science is evolving and where uncertainty persists.