U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

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CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatLeveraging Resources for Brownfield...

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Leveraging Resources for Brownfields Revitalization: Meet the Funders: Parks, Community Health, and the Arts

Brownfield grants from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are one of many sources of funds that can support redevelopment of contaminated sites. This webinar will highlight a number of redevelopment resources available from the National Park Service (NPS), The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) to leverage your brownfield dollars. The webinar will also feature a presentation from a community that has successfully used grants, loans and other support from these agencies for its revitalization efforts. It is the fourth in OBLR's webinar series on what communities need to know to successfully leverage resources for brownfields revitalization.

Superfund Redevelopment Initiative Series: Supporting Healthy Communities: A Superfund Opportunity

This webinar will share how the reuse of Superfund sites can transition properties from toxic legacies to places that encourage and support neighborhood health and well-being. Learn how sites are being used to support health and wellness facilities such as doctors' offices, and how the reuse of sites as recreational areas bolsters healthy activities.

Superfund Redevelopment Initiative Series: Restoring Superfund Sites to Public Good

Superfund sites can be reused in many ways, but many local governments are seeing unique opportunities to use sites for public or local government purposes. From roads to firefighting training facilities, local governments who own or acquire Superfund sites are finding ways to put these properties to good use.

Superfund Redevelopment Initiative Series: Opportunities for Reuse at Capped Sites

Former landfills, abandoned dumps, and other contaminated sites throughout the United States, once thought to be of limited value, are being transformed into viable commercial and industrial developments, parks and other recreational areas, and wildlife areas. With forethought and effective planning, communities and site stakeholders can return sites to productive use without jeopardizing the effectiveness of a remedial cap. This webinar will share lessons learned from the successful reuse and assessment of capped sites.

Superfund Redevelopment Initiative Series: Highlighting Beneficial Economic Impacts at Superfund Sites

Site redevelopment can revitalize a local economy with jobs, new businesses, tax revenues and local spending. This webinar will showcase new economic case studies across the country with different types of development- large and small, commercial and public, even new transportation options to show how they can all have beneficial impacts on the surrounding community.
Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Sites contaminated with dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) and DNAPL mixtures present significant environmental challenges. Despite the decades spent on characterizing and attempting to remediate DNAPL sites, substantial risk remains. Inadequate characterization of site geology as well as the distribution, characteristics, and behavior of contaminants -- by relying on traditional monitoring well methods rather than more innovative and integrated approaches -- has limited the success of many remediation efforts.

The Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization Team has synthesized the knowledge about DNAPL site characterization and remediation acquired over the past several decades, and has integrated that information into a new document, Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization and Tools Selection (ISC-1, 2015). This guidance is a resource to inform regulators, responsible parties, other problem holders, consultants, community stakeholders, and other interested parties of the critical concepts related to characterization approaches and tools for collecting subsurface data at DNAPL sites. After this associated training, participants will be able to use the ITRC Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization and Tools Selection (ISC-1, 2015) guidance to develop and support an integrated approach to DNAPL site characterization, including:
  • Identify what site conditions must be considered when developing an informative DNAPL conceptual site model (CSM)
  • Define an objectives-based DNAPL characterization strategy
  • Understand what tools and resources are available to improve the identification, collection, and evaluation of appropriate site characterization data
  • Navigate the DNAPL characterization tools table and select appropriate technologies to fill site-specific data gaps
For reference during the training class, participants should have a copy of Figure 4-1, the integrated site characterization flow diagram from the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance document: Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization and Tools Selection (ISC-1, 2015) and available as a PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/IDSC/ITRC-ISC-Figures.pdf
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Use and Measurement of Mass Flux and Mass Discharge

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Most decisions at groundwater contamination sites are driven by measurements of contaminant concentration -- snapshots of contaminant concentrations that may appear to be relatively stable or show notable changes over time. Decisions can be improved by considering mass flux and mass discharge. Mass flux and mass discharge quantify the source or plume strength at a given time and location resulting in better-informed management decisions regarding site prioritization or remedial design as well as lead to significant improvements in remediation efficiency and faster cleanup times. The use of mass flux and mass discharge is increasing and will accelerate as field methods improve and practitioners and regulators become familiar with its application, advantages, and limitations. The decision to collect and evaluate mass flux data is site-specific. It should consider the reliability of other available data, the uncertainty associated with mass flux measurements, the specific applications of the mass flux data, and the cost-benefit of collecting mass measurements.

The ITRC technology overview, Use and Measurement of Mass Flux and Mass Discharge (MASSFLUX-1, 2010), and associated Internet-based training provide a description of the underlying concepts, potential applications, description of methods for measuring and calculating, and case studies of the uses of mass flux and mass discharge. This Technology Overview, and associated internet based training are intended to foster the appropriate understanding and application of mass flux and mass discharge estimates, and provide examples of use and analysis. The document and training assumes the participant has a general understanding of hydrogeology, the movement of chemicals in porous media, remediation technologies, and the overall remedial process. Practitioners, regulators, and others working on groundwater sites should attend this training course to learn more about various methods and potential use of mass flux and mass discharge information.

Geophysical Classification for Munitions Response

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council For decades, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) has produced and used military munitions for live-fire testing and training to prepare the U.S. military for combat operations. As a result, unexploded ordnance (UXO) and discarded military munitions may be present at over 5,200 former ranges and former munitions operating facilities throughout the United States. With the traditional technique to identify munitions for removal at these sites, DOD and its contractors have used various types of detection instruments to simply detect buried metal objects then excavation and examination of most of the detected items, to determine whether or not they are military munitions. Even highly trained UXO-qualified personnel typically excavate hundreds of metal items for each one munition recovered. Nearly half of these sites require a munitions response, at an estimated cost to complete of $14 billion and with a completion date of 2100. To improve the efficiency of munitions response, DOD’s Environmental Security Technology Certification Program and its research partners in academia and industry have developed a new approach: geophysical classification. Geophysical classification is the process of using advanced data to make principled decisions as to whether buried metal objects are potentially hazardous munitions (that is targets of interest) that should be excavated, or items such as metal clutter and debris (non-targets of interest) that can be left in the ground.

ITRC’s Geophysical Classification for Munitions Response (GCMR-2, 2015) and training class explain the process of geophysical classification, describe its benefits and limitations, and discuss the information and data needed by regulators to monitor and evaluate the use of the technology. This document and training also emphasize using a systematic planning process to develop data acquisition and decision strategies at the outset of a munitions response effort, as well as quality considerations throughout the project. Stakeholder issues that are unique to munitions response are also discussed. After this training class, participants will:
  • Understand the technology and terminology
  • Be ready to engage in the planning process to address quality considerations throughout a project
  • Find tools to transfer knowledge within organizations and to stakeholders
  • Start to transition mindset to decisions that leave non-hazardous items in the ground
An audience who understand current munitions response tools and procedures (for example, geophysical surveys, sensors, data analysis) will benefit most from this document and training. For federal and state environmental regulators, scientists, and engineers, as well as contractors, munitions response managers, technical staff, geophysicists, and stakeholders, this document explains how geophysical classification can be used in munitions response. Stakeholders with an interest in a particular munitions response site (MRS) at which classification has been or may be proposed will also benefit from this document and training.

For use during this training class, we created a reference with the Terminology and Acronyms used in ITRC “Geophysical Classification for Munitions Response” Training.

Integrated DNAPL Site Strategy

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Sites contaminated by chlorinated solvents present a daunting environmental challenge, especially at sites with dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) still present. Restoring sites contaminated by chlorinated solvents to typical regulatory criteria (low parts-per-billion concentrations) within a generation (~20 years) has proven exceptionally difficult, although there have been successes. Site managers must recognize that complete restoration of many of these sites will require prolonged treatment and involve several remediation technologies. To make as much progress as possible requires a thorough understanding of the site, clear descriptions of achievable objectives, and use of more than one remedial technology. Making efficient progress will require an adaptive management approach, and may also require transitioning from one remedy to another as the optimum range of a technique is surpassed. Targeted monitoring should be used and re-evaluation should be done periodically.

This ITRC Integrated Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquid Site Strategy (IDSS-1, 2011) technical and regulatory guidance document will assist site managers in development of an integrated site remedial strategy. This course highlights five important features of an IDSS including:

  1. A conceptual site model (CSM) that is based on reliable characterization and an understanding of the subsurface conditions that control contaminant transport, reactivity, and distribution
  2. Remedial objectives and performance metrics that are clear, concise, and measureable
  3. Treatment technologies applied to optimize performance and take advantage of potential synergistic effects
  4. Monitoring based on interim and final cleanup objectives, the selected treatment technology and approach, and remedial performance goals
  5. Reevaluating the strategy repeatedly and even modifying the approach when objectives are not being met or when alternative methods offer similar or better outcomes at lower cost

This IDSS guidance and training is intended for regulators, remedial project managers, and remediation engineers responsible for sites contaminated by chlorinated solvents. Because the subject matter is complex, this guidance assumes a functional understanding of the field and is targeted towards experienced users; however, novices will benefit through descriptions and references of the latest evolution of site characterization challenges; realistic planning of site restoration; evolving treatment techniques; and evaluating, monitoring and interpreting mass transport in the subsurface aqueous and vapor phases. While the primary focus of the document is on DNAPL sites, other types of contaminated sites (e.g. petroleum, mixed contaminants, etc.) can use the same fundamental process described in this guidance.

For reference during the training class, participants should have a copy of the flow diagram, Figure 1-2 on page 6 of the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance document, ITRC Integrated Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquid Site Strategy (IDSS-1, 2011) and available as a 1-page PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/IDSS/ITRC-IDSS-1-Figure1-2.pdf.