U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

Fractured Bedrock Project Profiles

Last Updated: June 8, 2004

Point of Contact:
Michael Kozar
O'Brien & Gere Engineers
512 Township Line Rd., 2 Valley Sq.
Blue Bell PA 19422 
Tel: 215-628-9107 
Email: kozarms@obg.com

Former Tredegar Film Products
Hunterdon County, NJ


Hydrogeology:

Fractured shale of the Passaic Formation

Targeted Environmental Media:
  • - Fractured Bedrock

Contaminants:

Major Contaminants and Maximum Concentrations:
  • - Tetrachloroethene (500 µg/L)

Site Characterization Technologies:

No technologies selected.


Remedial Technologies:

  • - Bioremediation (In Situ)
    • Reductive Dechlorination (In Situ Bioremediation)
Comments:
Subsurface injection of Hydrogen Release Compound (HRC). The injection system consisted of ten bedrock wells. During drilling, field observations of drilling air pressures were used to further the site characterization and remediation design. A target injection mass of 10 lbs. of HRC per ft. of borehole was established. The injection was accomplished in March 2001 using a combination of injection methods, including straddle-packer injection, single packer injection and gravity feeding. Rapid changes in the site geochemistry, including the shift from aerobic to anaerobic conditions and production of organic acids were measured in 30 days after injection.

Within 90 days, the PCE concentrations were reduced by over 90% with a tempory increase in daughter product concentrations. Hydrogen concentrations were used as a tracer element for the HRC influence, which indicated the effect of the treatment extending beyond the target area.
Remediation Goals:

None provided


Status:

Monitoring is continuing . In July 2002, a No Further Action proposal was submitted to New Jersey DEP. In July 2003, NJDEP issued a NFA. VOC concentrations were above MCLs;however, no rebound was observed after the HRC treatment. Institutional controls must be recertified every two years. Ground water must be sampled every two years.

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