U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

Fractured Bedrock Project Profiles

Last Updated: December 6, 2005

Point of Contact:
Joseph Wellner
KYDEP
14 Reily Rd.
Frankfort KY 40601 
Tel: 502-564-6716 
Email: joseph.wellner@
ky.gov

Ft. Campbell
Ft. Campbell, KY


Hydrogeology:

Clay residuum interspersed with limestone cherts down to 40. Below is weathered epikarst layer of limestone that undulate 10 to 20 feet, and below this layer is fractured bed rock with solutional cavities with aperature as big as 10 inches in diameter.

Targeted Environmental Media:
  • - Fractured Bedrock

Contaminants:

Major Contaminants and Maximum Concentrations:
  • - JP-4 (free product)
  • - Kerosene (varies)

Site Characterization Technologies:

  • - Borehole Geophysics
    • Single Point Resistance
    • Natural Gamma
  • - Fluid Loggings
    • Conductivity/Resistivity
  • - Surface Seismic Surveys
    • Refraction
  • - Vertical Chemical Profiling
    • Cluster Wells
  • - Fracture Trace Analysis
  • - Surface Conductivity Surveys (EM)
  • - GPR Surveys
  • - Coring
  • - Tracer (dye) Test

Comments:
Found pockets of fuel in epikarst but not enough to account for the amount of fuel lost. An interim pump and treat system is in place and extracting free product. Dye trace of ground water found discharge at near by spring. No contaminant at levels of concern have been detected at spring.


Remedial Technologies:

  • - Multi Phase Extraction

Remediation Goals:

None provided


Status:

Data from a recent bore hole drilling to determine the anomalies between seismic refraction profiling and two dimensional electrical resistivity imaging seems to indicate that the difference is due to free product pools since 2 of the 3 boring hit free product. Extraction wells were installed at these locations. If this is the conclusion that can be drawn after further analysis, then these tools could be used to locate other pockets of free product for pump and treat.

As of May, 2004 the Corps of Engineers was still use multi-phase extraction wells.

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