U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

Fractured Bedrock Project Profiles

Last Updated: June 27, 2007

Point of Contact:
Mary DeFlaun
3131 Princeton Pike
Bldg. 1-B, Suite 205
Princeton NJ 08648 
Tel: 609-895-1400 
Fax: 609-895-1401
Email: mdeflaun@
geosyntec.com

Former Naval Air Warfare Center
West Trenton, NJ


Hydrogeology:

Specific site hydrogeology was not identified in the reference cited.

Targeted Environmental Media:
  • - Fractured Bedrock

Contaminants:

No lateral or vertical extent was identified.

Major Contaminants and Maximum Concentrations:
  • - Trichloroethene (23,400 µg/L)

Site Characterization Technologies:

No technologies selected.


Remedial Technologies:

  • - Other (Bioaugmentation)
Comments:
The test area extended 9,000 square feet (ft2) and 115 feet deep. The test area was bounded by four wells that were used as injection and extraction points for KB-1, a culture containing Dehalococcoides ethenogenes and EOS, an emulsified edible oil electron donor. The bacteria and electron donor were injected in July 2005, with post-injection monitoring completed at weeks 2, 4, 12, 24, and 36.
Remediation Goals:

The objective of the large-scale pilot test was to identify whether bioaugmentation, through the addition of electron donor and a culture containing TCE-degrading bacteria would be successful in reducing contaminant concentrations of TCE.


Status:

The application of bioaugmentation was successful in decreasing the concentrations of TCE and by-products in the ground water of the test area. Post-treatment data was not provided in the reference cited.


Lessons Learned:

The concentration of TCE had remained unchanged from 1998 until this remediation approach was implemented, in spite of an operational pump and treat system. This lack of change indicated that the rate of removal of TCE by ground water extraction is limited by the rate of diffusion of TCE from the bedrock matrix, the rate of dissolution of DNAPL into ground water, or both.

References: Mary DeFlaun, Scott Drew, Jeff Dale, Pierre Lacombe, and Patrick Schauble. The Application of Bioaugmentation for TCE DNAPL in Fractured Bedrock. The Fifth International Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds. May 22-25, 2006. Monterey, California.

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