U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

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CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatIn Situ Activated Carbon-Based Tech...

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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatPerspectives on the Implementation ...


Download seminar information in iCalendar formatPractical Applications of Phytotech...

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In Situ Activated Carbon-Based Technology for Groundwater Remediation: Overview, Best Practices, and Case Studies

This webinar is a result of Recommendation 9 of EPA's Superfund Task Force, which encourages the Superfund program to "utilize state-of-the-art technologies to expedite cleanup." Actions under this recommendation include expanding the use of new remediation technologies and approaches to address contaminated sites.
https://www.epa.gov/superfund/superfund-task-force-public-participation-opportunities#webinar

In this webinar, we will present an overview of in situ activated carbon (AC)-based remediation technology, discuss important considerations for site characterization and treatment design, and present characterizations of physical, chemical and biological processes involved in a long-term case study where reactive AC-based technology was applied.

Borehole Geophysics Applied to Bedrock Hydrogeologic Evaluations

This presentation introduces the viewer to borehole geophysical tools commonly used in hydrogeologic investigations. These tools include gamma, temperature, conductivity, caliper, borehole video, acoustic and optical televiewers, heat-pulse flowmeter, and borehole deviation.. Examples and case studies follow illustrating the usefulness of data obtained through the utilization of these tools, especially when used to design packer tests and multi-level discrete-zone sampling strings. In addition, borehole tools commonly used in shallow oil/gas well abandonment are presented.

Perspectives on the Implementation of Greener Cleanups

The practice of implementing greener cleanups to secure protective remedies with a lower environmental footprint continues to mature and expand, with greater levels of experience among regulators, site owners, and cleanup professionals alike. Through this webinar we will hear first-hand from individuals in all three sectors on their experiences with actual sites where greener cleanups have been implemented., Three of the projects applied the ASTM Standard Guide for Greener Cleanups (E2893), and represent three major federal agencies involved in site cleanups. We will also learn how greener cleanups are implemented by a corporation owning a portfolio of sites requiring remediation work.

NARPM and OSC Academy Presents...ESA and NHPA for RPMs and OSCs

This webinar provides OSCs and RPMs with an overview of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) and the requirements of Section 106 under CERCLA. The focus will be on EPA's Emergency Response and Removal Program. NHPA applies to your response action if your action constitutes an undertaking and will have a potential effect on a property that is eligible for or included in the National Register of Historic Places.

The overview of the steps of the Section 106 consultation process includes: a review of NHPA under CERCLA; determining if a response action constitutes an undertaking; establishing the area of potential effects of the undertaking; identifying any historic properties within that area, and evaluating whether the undertaking will affect such properties, and if so, whether the effects may be adverse; and where there are adverse effects anticipated, identifying ways to minimize or mitigate any adverse effects.

The primary audience for this training is EPA OSCs and RPMs; however, it is open to other federal agencies, states, tribes and consultants who are interested in learning more about the NHPA statute.

NARPM Presents...Stress and Environmental Contamination: Tips and Tools from ATSDR

Environmental contamination can disrupt life as usual. Community members may feel stress for several reasons, including health and financial concerns. Join this webinar to learn more about stress, how it can affect health, and why environmental contamination can cause it. We’ll offer practical tips and tools for acknowledging stress with community members and helping them cope. The webinar will wrap up with suggestions for dealing with stress you may feel as a professional working with communities affected by environmental contamination.

Attendees may be interested in Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) stress-focused fact sheets and materials. Please see:

Practical Applications of Phytotechnologies at Contaminated Sites

Phytoremediation is the practice of using plants to mitigate environmental contamination and reduce exposure humans and ecological receptors to that contamination. This webinar will introduce participants to the science of phytotechnology in the context of contaminated site remediation. Technical experts will discuss the practical aspects of phytoremediation and explore opportunities where the use of plants could be integrated as part of a remedial approach. The webinar will discuss the considerations and future of phytotechnology at contaminated sites and share additional resources. Participants will have a better understanding for evaluating phytoremediation as a remedial approach for contaminated sites.

Superfund Redevelopment Initiative Series: Superfund and Cultural Competence - Building a Foundation for Effective Community Engagement

EPA staff interact with impacted communities across the country. These communities may represent a broad range of cultures, including cultures based in race/ethnicity, class, place and other forms of identity. Each EPA site team may also represent a diverse range of cultural perspectives, skill sets and differing professional cultures. This webinar will show how understanding cultural competence skills and tools can help people connect across difference or perceived difference and work together more effectively. This webinar will deepen participants' understanding of what culture is and how it impacts Superfund work, and demonstrate through a series of case studies how becoming culturally competent can improve remedial outcomes, prepare job trainees for successfully entering the workforce, and improve dynamics of remedial teams whose members have different areas of expertise. The Superfund Redevelopment Initiative is hosting this webinar and is happy to answer any follow up questions about the webinar from the press or other interested parties.
Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


Remediation Management of Complex Sites

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council At some sites, complex site-specific conditions make it difficult to fully remediate environmental contamination. Both technical and nontechnical challenges can impede remediation and may prevent a site from achieving federal- and state-mandated regulatory cleanup goals within a reasonable time frame. For example, technical challenges may include geologic, hydrogeologic, geochemical, and contaminant-related conditions as well as large-scale or surface conditions. In addition, nontechnical challenges may also play a role such as managing changes that occur over long time frames, overlapping regulatory and financial responsibilities between agencies, setting achievable site objectives, maintaining effective institutional controls, redevelopment and changes in land use, and funding considerations.
This training course and associated ITRC guidance: Remediation Management of Complex Sites (RMCS-1, 2017), provide a recommended holistic process for management of challenging sites, termed “adaptive site management.” This process is a comprehensive, flexible, and iterative process that is well-suited for sites where there is significant uncertainty in remedy performance predictions. Adaptive site management includes the establishment of interim objectives and long-term site objectives that consider both technical and nontechnical challenges. Periodic adjustment of the remedial approach may involve multiple technologies at any one time and changes in technologies over time. Comprehensive planning and scheduled evaluations of remedy performance help decision makers track remedy progress and improve the timeliness of remedy optimization, reevaluations, or transition to other technologies/contingency actions.
By participating in this training course we expect you will learn to apply the ITRC guidance document to:
  • Identify and integrate technical and nontechnical challenges into a holistic approach to remediation
  • Use the Remediation Potential Assessment to identify whether adaptive site management is warranted due to site complexity
  • Understand and apply adaptive site management principles
  • Develop a long-term performance-based action plan
  • Apply well-demonstrated techniques for effective stakeholder engagement
  • Access additional resources, tools, and case studies most relevant for complex sites
  • Communicate the value of the guidance to regulators, practitioners, community members, and others
Ultimately, using the guidance that can lead to better decision making and remediation management at complex sites. The guidance is intended to benefit a variety of site decision makers, including regulators, responsible parties and their consultants, and public and tribal stakeholders.
Case studies are used to describe real-world applications of remediation and remediation management at complex sites. Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance Remediation Management of Complex Sites (RMCS-1, 2017) prior to attending the class.