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CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
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An Environmental Cold Case Detective Story: Discovery and Repair of the Soil Cover on the Cell 3 Landfill

The Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) Denver Post and Philadelphia Post along with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are hosting a series of webinars based on talks given at recent Design and Construction Issues at Hazardous Waste Sites (DCHWS) Symposiums. The mission of the DCHWS symposiums is to facilitate an interactive engagement between professionals from government and the private sector related to relevant and topical issues affecting applications of engineering and science associated with cleaning up hazardous waste sites. The symposiums also serve as a platform to facilitate the exchange of information, encourage dialogue, share experiences, and build and enhance communication among design and construction professionals.

This presentation will review work conducted at Landfill Cell 3 on Closed Sanitary Landfill (CSL) at Fort Meade. During activities to remove some waste soil piles in 2013, test pits uncovered general wastes under a plastic liner and it was realized that Cell 3 was a waste site in the past that, based on old figures and aerial photographs, extended for over 38 acres. A remedial investigation was conducted that summarized the landfill history, delineated the boundary of the cell, and assessed environmental impacts from the cell.

This case study begins with discovery and planning the performance-based contract, it includes review of the various phases of site investigations and concludes with the construction of the landfill cover. This work was performed while active soil staging operations occurred on the majority of Cell 3. Critical to success was that Cell 3 was closed in 1976 with a 2-ft soil cover prior to 1988 when MDE altered the requirements for landfill closure.

With the numerous entities involved and evolving site conditions, active project team management was required including reducing the scope of the landfill cover 85%, from 38 acres to 6.2 acres to accommodate ongoing soil staging operations on the remainder of the cell. The team carefully applied state regulations that worked best by reusing and recycling available material and incorporating stable, established side slopes into the landfill cover design. One key to the success of this project was an adaptive contract to manage the evolving issues. As different construction projects on Fort Meade required more of the Cell 3 footprint for staging soils, the performance-based contract for the Cell 3 cover had to be modified. The contract allowed for segregation of the different regulator required documents and of the different portions of the field tasks, which allowed for an easier adaptation to these changing site conditions.

Design and Construction Issues at Hazardous Waste Sites Webinar on Successful Remedial Design, Session 1

The Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) Denver Post and Philadelphia Post along with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are hosting a series of webinars based on talks given at recent Design and Construction Issues at Hazardous Waste Sites (DCHWS) Symposiums. The mission of the DCHWS symposiums is to facilitate an interactive engagement between professionals from government and the private sector related to relevant and topical issues affecting applications of engineering and science associated with cleaning up hazardous waste sites. The symposiums also serve as a platform to facilitate the exchange of information, encourage dialogue, share experiences, and build and enhance communication among design and construction professionals.

This session will include the following presentation:

Site Assessment, Design Considerations, and Performance Results from a Innovative Barrier Application at a Large Chlorinated Plume in Texas

A large chlorinated solvent plume situated in a cemented sandstone bedrock aquifer contaminated private water wells under a residential neighborhood in Texas. Typical HRSC techniques were not feasible due to the aquifer characteristics. Long-term field data will demonstrate how an innovative CSM assessment and barrier design approach achieved MCLs and prevented further off-site migration. Groundwater extraction from private, off-site wells resulted in a large chlorinated solvent plume that needed to be addressed to prevent further off-site migration. Remedial approaches considered included groundwater pump and treat, enhanced reductive dichlorination (ERD), and an in situ carbon sorption/biotreatment. A colloidal activated carbon (CAC) barrier provided the most cost-effective solution by rapidly preventing off-site migration and preventing biofouling of the downgradient potable wells that may develop from typical ERD in situ remedies. This presentation will focus on several innovative approaches to identify contaminant mass flux and the use of an innovative model to predict remedial performance. Performance monitoring data from over 30 months from multiple monitoring wells shown excellent results from the CAC barrier, with the results meeting the project performance objectives (below MCLs) and preventing further contaminant downgradient migration.

Design and Construction Issues at Hazardous Waste Sites Webinar on Successful Remedial Design, Session 2

The Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) Denver Post and Philadelphia Post along with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are hosting a series of webinars based on talks given at recent Design and Construction Issues at Hazardous Waste Sites (DCHWS) Symposiums. The mission of the DCHWS symposiums is to facilitate an interactive engagement between professionals from government and the private sector related to relevant and topical issues affecting applications of engineering and science associated with cleaning up hazardous waste sites. The symposiums also serve as a platform to facilitate the exchange of information, encourage dialogue, share experiences, and build and enhance communication among design and construction professionals.

This session will include the following presentation:

Successful High Density Sludge (HDS) Treatment Plant Design for Acid Mine Drainage

The high density sludge (HDS) process was developed by Bethlehem Steel in the 1960s in response to high sludge disposal costs following lime neutralization treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD). Since then it has become the preeminent AMD treatment process not only for significantly lower sludge production but also for its ability to provide more stable treatment over a wide range of AMD chemistries. However, even after nearly 50 years why and how it works, and what's needed for effective design of an HDS treatment plant, is not widely known. This presentation describes the fundamentals of HDS and key information needed for successful design.

2021 Design and Construction at Hazardous Waste Sites Virtual Symposium

Given the COVID-19 national health emergency and its affects on corporate/government travel policies as well as local/state health requirements, it has become necessary to hold the conference as a remote webinar based event. With the DCHWS Philadelphia Conference being canceled earlier this year, our fall conference will be co-sponsored by the SAME Philadelphia Post, the SAME Denver Metro Post, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

For more information on this session, please visit the sponsor's event website.

Monday, March 29, 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm EDT - Groundwater Remediation: In-situ Technology Design and Construction Considerations and Case Studies

PANEL 1 - IN-SITU REMEDIATION: CASE STUDIES.
Moderator: Rosa Gwinn, AECOM

PANEL 2 - IN-SITU AMENDMENT AND DELIVERY METHODS: DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION CONSIDERATIONS.
Moderator: Rich Evans, Groundwater & Environmental Services, Inc.

Wednesday, March 31, 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm EDT - Design and Construction Project Management Case Studies

PANEL 3 - PROACTIVE SITE MANAGEMENT.
Moderator: Laura Tobin, WSP

PANEL 4 - PROJECT RISK MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS AND DISPOSAL CHALLENGES.
Moderator: Steve Gillespie, Sevenson Environmental Services

Thursday, April 1, 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm EDT - Hazardous Waste Remediation: Project Management Tools and Techniques

PANEL 5 - IMPROVING STAKEHOLDER COLLABORATION: A COLLECTION OF CASE STUDIES.
Moderator: Todd Bragdon, CDM Smith

YOUNG PROFESSIONAL EVENT - MOVING UP TO PROJECT MANAGEMENT

2021 Design and Construction at Hazardous Waste Sites Virtual Symposium

Given the COVID-19 national health emergency and its affects on corporate/government travel policies as well as local/state health requirements, it has become necessary to hold the conference as a remote webinar based event. With the DCHWS Philadelphia Conference being canceled earlier this year, our fall conference will be co-sponsored by the SAME Philadelphia Post, the SAME Denver Metro Post, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

For more information on this session, please visit the sponsor's event website.

Monday, March 29, 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm EDT - Groundwater Remediation: In-situ Technology Design and Construction Considerations and Case Studies

PANEL 1 - IN-SITU REMEDIATION: CASE STUDIES.
Moderator: Rosa Gwinn, AECOM

PANEL 2 - IN-SITU AMENDMENT AND DELIVERY METHODS: DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION CONSIDERATIONS.
Moderator: Rich Evans, Groundwater & Environmental Services, Inc.

Wednesday, March 31, 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm EDT - Design and Construction Project Management Case Studies

PANEL 3 - PROACTIVE SITE MANAGEMENT.
Moderator: Laura Tobin, WSP

PANEL 4 - PROJECT RISK MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS AND DISPOSAL CHALLENGES.
Moderator: Steve Gillespie, Sevenson Environmental Services

Thursday, April 1, 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm EDT - Hazardous Waste Remediation: Project Management Tools and Techniques

PANEL 5 - IMPROVING STAKEHOLDER COLLABORATION: A COLLECTION OF CASE STUDIES.
Moderator: Todd Bragdon, CDM Smith

YOUNG PROFESSIONAL EVENT - MOVING UP TO PROJECT MANAGEMENT

2021 Design and Construction at Hazardous Waste Sites Virtual Symposium

Given the COVID-19 national health emergency and its affects on corporate/government travel policies as well as local/state health requirements, it has become necessary to hold the conference as a remote webinar based event. With the DCHWS Philadelphia Conference being canceled earlier this year, our fall conference will be co-sponsored by the SAME Philadelphia Post, the SAME Denver Metro Post, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

For more information on this session, please visit the sponsor's event website.

Monday, March 29, 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm EDT - Groundwater Remediation: In-situ Technology Design and Construction Considerations and Case Studies

PANEL 1 - IN-SITU REMEDIATION: CASE STUDIES.
Moderator: Rosa Gwinn, AECOM

PANEL 2 - IN-SITU AMENDMENT AND DELIVERY METHODS: DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION CONSIDERATIONS.
Moderator: Rich Evans, Groundwater & Environmental Services, Inc.

Wednesday, March 31, 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm EDT - Design and Construction Project Management Case Studies

PANEL 3 - PROACTIVE SITE MANAGEMENT.
Moderator: Laura Tobin, WSP

PANEL 4 - PROJECT RISK MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS AND DISPOSAL CHALLENGES.
Moderator: Steve Gillespie, Sevenson Environmental Services

Thursday, April 1, 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm EDT - Hazardous Waste Remediation: Project Management Tools and Techniques

PANEL 5 - IMPROVING STAKEHOLDER COLLABORATION: A COLLECTION OF CASE STUDIES.
Moderator: Todd Bragdon, CDM Smith

YOUNG PROFESSIONAL EVENT - MOVING UP TO PROJECT MANAGEMENT

Mining Webinar Series: Evaluation of Rotating Cylinder Treatment System™ at Elizabeth Mine, Vermont

This webinar will present a case study of the rotating cylinder treatment system™ (RCTS™) operated at the Elizabeth Mine in Strafford, Vermont. The webinar will discuss the capabilities and limitations of active lime treatment of water using the RCTS™ technology.
Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


1,4-Dioxane: Science, Characterization & Analysis, and Remediation

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council 1,4-Dioxane has seen widespread use as a solvent stabilizer since the 1950s. The widespread use of solvents through the 1980s suggests its presence at thousands of solvent sites in the US; however, it is not always a standard compound in typical analytical suites for hazardous waste sites, so it previously was overlooked. The U.S. EPA has classified 1,4-dioxane as "likely to be carcinogenic to humans." Some states have devised health standards or regulatory guidelines for drinking water and groundwater standards; these are often sub-part per billion values. These low standards present challenges for analysis, characterization, and remediation of 1,4-dioxane. The ITRC team created multiple tools and documents that provide information to assist all interested stakeholders in understanding this contaminate and for making informed, educated decisions.

The 1,4-Dioxane: Science, Characterization & Analysis, and Remediation training is a series of six (6) modules. The six individual modules will be presented together live, and then archived on the ITRC 1,4-Dioxane training webpage for on demand listening.

The modular 1,4-Dioxane training series provides an overview of 1,4-dioxane and presenting six sections from the ITRC guidance document (1,4d-1, 2021):
  • History of Use and Potential Sources (Sect 1)
  • Regulatory Framework (Sect 2)
  • Fate and Transport (Sect 3)
  • Sampling and Analysis (Sect 4)
  • Toxicity and Risk Assessment (Sect 5)
  • Remediation and Treatment Technologies (Sect 6)
After the six-part 1,4-Dioxane: Science, Characterization & Analysis, and Remediation series, you should understand:
  • The history of 1,4-dioxane manufacturing and usage and the potential sources of releases of 1,4-dioxane to the environment.
  • Primary state and U.S. federal regulatory programs of relevance to 1,4-dioxane
  • Key physical/chemical properties, and fate and transport processes that are relevant for 1,4-dioxane
  • Benefits and limitations of the available analytical methods
  • Risk drivers for human health and how ecological risk compares
  • How/when/why different treatment technologies are appropriate

We encourage you to use the ITRC 1,4-Dioxane products (14d-1) and these training modules to learn about 1,4-dioxane and how you can apply these best practices to improve decision-making at your sites.
For regulators and other government agency staff, this understanding of 1,4-dioxane can be incorporated into your own programs. This training summarizes the current understanding of 1,4-dioxane. While the training makes every effort to keep the information accessible to a wide audience, it is assumed that the participants will have some basic technical understanding of chemistry, environmental sciences, and risk assessment. As with other emerging contaminants, our understanding of 1,4-dioxane continues to advance. This training provides the participants with information on areas where the science is evolving and where uncertainty persists.

ITRC Incremental Sampling Methodology (ISM-2) Update Training Modules

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Please note that Modules 1-3 will be presented on January 26, 2021 and then archived for on demand listening. Modules 4-6 will be presented on March 11, 2021 and then archived. Registration for Modules 4-6 will open in early February 2021.

The newly updated Incremental Sampling Methodology (ISM) training is a series of six modules providing an overview of ISM and presenting five sections from the ITRC guidance document (ISM-2, 2020):
  • Overview (Sect 1)
  • Heterogeneity (Sect 2)
  • Statistics (Sect 3.2), Data Use Planning (Sect 3.3), and Data Quality Evaluation (Sect 6)
  • Field Sampling Collection (Sect 4)
  • Lab Preparation (Sect 5)
  • Risk Assessment (Sect 8)
After this series, you should understand:
  • Incremental Sampling Methodology (ISM) is a statistically supported technique for assessing the unbiased mean contaminant concentration in soil, sediment, and other solid media which can afford an economy of effort and resources in your
  • How the ISM structured composite sampling and processing protocol reduces data variability and provides for representative samples of specific soil volumes by collecting numerous increments of soil (typically, 30 to 100 increments) that are combined, processed, and subsampled according to specific protocols.
  • The key principles regarding heterogeneous soil sampling errors and how ISM reduces those errors to have more confidence in sampling results.
  • How to use the new ITRC Incremental Sampling Methodology (ISM-2) guidance document to learn the principles and approaches of the methodology to improve representative, reproducible, and defensible data to improve decision-making at your sites.

For regulators and other government agency staff, this improved understanding can hopefully be incorporated into your own programs. ISM is finding increased use in the field, as well as acceptance and endorsement by an increasing number of state and federal regulatory organizations. Proponents have found that the sampling density afforded by collecting many increments, together with the disciplined processing and subsampling of the combined increments, in most cases yields more consistent and reproducible results than those obtained by more traditional discrete sampling approaches.

Prior to attending the training class, participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, Incremental Sampling Methodology (ISM-2). Participants interested in ISM background information prior to the ISM-2 training are encouraged to view the ISM-1 training at ITRC Soil Sampling and Decision Making Using Incremental Sampling Methodology 2-Part Training Series.

Long-term Contaminant Management Using Institutional Controls

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Institutional controls (ICs) are administrative or legal restrictions that provide protection from exposure to contaminants on a site. When ICs are jeopardized or fail, direct exposure to human health and the environment can occur. While a variety of guidance and research to date has focused on the implementation of ICs, ITRC's Long-term Contaminant Management Using Institutional Controls (IC-1, 2016) guidance and this associated training class focuses on post-implementation IC management, including monitoring, evaluation, stakeholder communications, enforcement, and termination. The ITRC guidance and training will assist those who are responsible for the management and stewardship of Ics. ITRC has developed a downloadable tool that steps users through the process of planning and designing IC management needs. This tool can help to create a long lasting record of the site that includes the regulatory authority, details of the IC, the responsibilities of all parties, a schedule for monitoring the performance of the IC, and more. The tool generates an editable Long Term Stewardship (LTS) plan in Microsoft Word.

After attending the training, participants will be able to:
  • Describe best practices and evolving trends for IC management at individual sites and across state agency programs
  • Use this guidance to
    • Improve IC reliability and prevent IC failures
    • Improve existing, or develop new, IC Management programs
    • Identify the pros and cons about differing IC management approaches
  • Use the tools to establish an LTS plan for specific sites
  • Use the elements in the tools to understand the information that should populate an IC registry or data management system.

The target audience for this guidance includes environmental regulators at all levels of government, private and public responsible or obligated parties (Ops), current site owners and operators, environmental consultants, and prospective purchasers of property and their agents. Other stakeholders who have an interest in a property can also use this guidance to help understand how to manage Ics.

Connecting the Science to Managing LNAPL Sites a 3 Part Series

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Connecting the Science to Managing LNAPL Sites - 3-Part Series

The newly updated LNAPLs (Light Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids) 3-part training course series is based on the ITRC guidance: LNAPL Site Management: LCSM Evolution, Decision Process, and Remedial Technologies (LNAPL-3, 2018) and focuses on connecting the science to managing LNAPL sites and helping you:
  • Build upon your Understanding of LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface (Part 1)
  • Develop your LNAPL Conceptual Site Model and LNAPL Remedial Goals (Part 2)
  • Select/Implement LNAPL Technologies (Part 3)
After this training series, the expectation is that you will have the skills and understanding to use ITRC science-based resources to improve decision making at your LNAPL sites. For regulators and other government agency staff, this improved understanding can hopefully be incorporated into your own LNAPL programs.

It is recommended that participants have a general understanding of hydrogeology and some familiarity with petroleum contaminated sites. The courses will build on your existing LNAPL knowledge and outline the framework for making LNAPL remediation and management decisions. It is expected that participants will attend this 3-part training series in sequence.

LNAPL Training Part 1: Understanding LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface
Part 1 teaches how LNAPLs behave in the subsurface and examines what controls their behavior. Part 1:
  • Explains what LNAPL data can tell you about the LNAPL and site conditions
  • Covers how that information is applied to the development of an LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM) (Part 2) and LNAPL technology selection (Part 3)
Relevant and practical examples are used to illustrate key concepts.

LNAPL Training Part 2: LNAPL Conceptual Site Models and the LNAPL Decision Process
Part 2 teaches participants how to develop an LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM) and the overall framework for making LNAPL remediation and management decisions. Part 2:
  • Discusses key LNAPL and site data
  • Explains when and why those data may be important
  • Covers how to effectively organize the data into an LCSM
Part 2 also discusses how to address LNAPL concerns by selecting appropriate goals and objectives, choosing applicable technologies, and assigning remedial performance metrics and endpoints.

LNAPL Training Part 3: Using LNAPL Science, the LCSM, and LNAPL Goals to Select an LNAPL Remedial Technology
Part 3 of the training teaches the importance of informed remedial technology selection and appropriate technology application. Part 3:
  • Discusses remedial technology groups
  • Introduces specific and new remedial technologies
  • Reviews the technology selection process, how technologies can be combined to accelerate cleanup, and how the LCSM informs selection
A case study and examples demonstrate the use of these tools for remedial technology selection, implementation, and demonstration of successful remediation.
Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, LNAPL Site Management: LCSM Evolution, Decision Process, and Remedial Technologies (LNAPL-3, 2018), prior to attending the class.

Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Chemical contaminants in soil and groundwater can volatilize into soil gas and migrate through unsaturated soils of the vadose zone. Vapor intrusion (VI) occurs when these vapors migrate upward into overlying buildings through cracks and gaps in the building floors, foundations, and utility conduits, and contaminate indoor air. If present at sufficiently high concentrations, these vapors may present a threat to the health and safety of building occupants. Petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) is a subset of VI and is the process by which volatile petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) released as vapors from light nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPL), petroleum-contaminated soils, or petroleum-contaminated groundwater migrate through the vadose zone and into overlying buildings. Fortunately, in the case of PHC vapors, this migration is often limited by microorganisms that are normally present in soil. The organisms consume these chemicals, reducing them to nontoxic end products through the process of biodegradation. The extent and rate to which this natural biodegradation process occurs is strongly influenced by the concentration of the vapor source, the distance the vapors must travel through soil from the source to potential receptors, and the presence of oxygen (O2) in the subsurface environment between the source and potential receptors.

The ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance Web-Based Document, Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management (PVI-1, 2014) and this associated Internet-based training provides regulators and practitioners with consensus information based on empirical data and recent research to support PVI decision making under different regulatory frameworks. The PVI assessment strategy described in this guidance document enables confident decision making that protects human health for various types of petroleum sites and multiple PHC compounds. This guidance provides a comprehensive methodology for screening, investigating, and managing potential PVI sites and is intended to promote the efficient use of resources and increase confidence in decision making when evaluating the potential for vapor intrusion at petroleum-contaminated sites. By using the ITRC guidance document, the vapor intrusion pathway can be eliminated from further investigation at many sites where soil or groundwater is contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons or where LNAPL is present.

After attending this ITRC Internet-based training, participants should be able to:
  • Determine when and how to use the ITRC PVI document at their sites
  • Describe the important role of biodegradation impacts on the PVI pathway (in contrast to chlorinated solvent contaminated sites)
  • Value a PVI conceptual site model (CSM) and list its key components
  • Apply the ITRC PVI 8 step decision process to screen sites for the PVI pathway and determine actions to take if a site does not initially screen out, (e.g., site investigation, modeling, and vapor control and site management)
  • Access fact sheets to support community engagement activities at each step in the process
For reference during the training class, participants should have a copy of the flowcharts, Figures 1-2, 3-2, and 4-1 from the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance Web-Based Document, Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management (PVI-1, 2014) and are available as a 3-page PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/PVI/ITRC-PVI-FlowCharts.pdf


ITRC also offers a 2-day PVI focused classroom training at locations across the US. The classroom training provides participants the opportunity to learn more in-depth information about the PVI pathway and practice applying the ITRC PVI guidance document with a diverse group of environmental professionals. Learn more at the ITRC PVI classroom training page.