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CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatITRC Issues and Options in Human He...

Issues and Options in Human Health Risk Assessment - A Resource When Alternatives to Default Parameters and Scenarios are Proposed
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatSuperfund Research Program Progress...

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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatITRC Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fun...

Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management
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Download seminar information in iCalendar format2020 Design and Construction at Haz...

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Download seminar information in iCalendar format2020 Design and Construction at Haz...

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Download seminar information in iCalendar format2020 Design and Construction at Haz...


Download seminar information in iCalendar formatSuperfund Research Program Progress...

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2020 Design and Construction at Hazardous Waste Sites Virtual Symposium: Panel 1 and Panel 2

Given the COVID-19 national health emergency and its affects on corporate/government travel policies as well as local/state health requirements, it has become necessary to hold the conference as a remote webinar based event. With the DCHWS Philadelphia Conference being canceled earlier this year, our fall conference will be co-sponsored by the SAME Philadelphia Post, the SAME Denver Metro Post, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

For more information and to register for this session, please visit the sponsor's event website.

Panel 1: Bringing Groundwater Treatment Remedies to the Finish Line
Moderator: Paul Favara, Jacobs
  • Use of Phytoremediation to Augment Standard Pump and Treat Technologies at Superfund Sites, Author: Neil J. Brown, Ecology and Environment Engineering and Geology, P.C.
  • The Application of Engineered Phytotechnology for Remedial System Optimization and Ultimate Site Closure of a Complex 1,4-Dioxane Site in Sarasota, Florida, Author: Ron Gestler, Geosyntec Consultants
  • Colloidal Activated Carbon used to Reduce PFAS and Chlorinated Solvent Concentrations in Groundwater to Below Detection Limits at a Michigan Army National Guard Site, Author: Ryan Moore (YM), REGENESIS

Panel 2: Combination Remedies: A Collection of Case Studies
Moderator: Thomas Cornuet, Ramboll

  • A Dual Biorecirculation System to Facilitate VOC Mass Reduction and Hydraulic Control in Fractured Bedrock, Author: Jeff Bamer, CDM Smith
  • Lessons Learned from the Installation and Operation of a Combined Injection and Groundwater Recirculation Trench System for In Situ Remediation, Author: Erin Hauber, US Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City District
  • Optimized Cleanup Outcomes Through Proactive Combined Remediation, Author: Paul Dombrowski, ISOTEC Remedial Technologies

2020 Design and Construction at Hazardous Waste Sites Virtual Symposium: Panel 3 and Panel 4

Given the COVID-19 national health emergency and its affects on corporate/government travel policies as well as local/state health requirements, it has become necessary to hold the conference as a remote webinar based event. With the DCHWS Philadelphia Conference being canceled earlier this year, our fall conference will be co-sponsored by the SAME Philadelphia Post, the SAME Denver Metro Post, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

For more information and to register for this session, please visit the sponsor's event website.

Panel 3: Thermal Treatment: Challenges and Lessons Learned
Moderator: Diana Cutt, EPA Region 2
  • Highly Complex Thermal Conduction Heating Remediation, Author: Lauren Soos, TRS Group, Inc.
  • Challenges Encountered on Heavily Contaminated Thermal NAPL Sites, Author: Steffen Griepke, Cascade Thermal
  • Challenges of Thermal Remediation at Two Waste Oil Superfund Sites, Author: Eva Davis, EPA Office of Research and Development

Panel 4: Using Modern Technology to Improve RD/RA
Moderator: Eric White, PARS Environmental

  • Drones, LiDAR, and 3D Models: A New Paradigm for Data Visualization and Analysis and the Project Management Benefits for Large Hazardous Waste Remediation Projects , Author: Tim Cushman (YM), Ramboll
  • Innovative Remediation Solutions and Stakeholder Engagement to Aggressively Remediate LNAPL Plumes, Author: Chuck Whisman, Geosyntec Consultants
  • The Utilization of the ArcGIS Platform for Wildfire Response with Associated Data in Real Time: Reducing Risk, Removing Hazardous Waste, and Assuring a Safe Recovery Environment, Author: Janine Polinko Latham, Weston Solutions, Inc.

2020 Design and Construction at Hazardous Waste Sites Virtual Symposium: Panel 5 and Panel 6

Given the COVID-19 national health emergency and its affects on corporate/government travel policies as well as local/state health requirements, it has become necessary to hold the conference as a remote webinar based event. With the DCHWS Philadelphia Conference being canceled earlier this year, our fall conference will be co-sponsored by the SAME Philadelphia Post, the SAME Denver Metro Post, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

For more information and to register for this session, please visit the sponsor's event website.

Panel 5: Overcoming Remediation Challenges in Urban/High Access Settings
Moderator: Andrew Bullard, CDM Smith
  • Colorado Smelter: Keeping the Accelerator On During COVID-19, Author: Sabrina Forrest, EPA Region 8
  • Innovative Pulsed Ozone Microdiffusion Sparge Approach for Tetrachloroethylene Remediation at an Arizona State Superfund Site, Author: Kirk Craig, Geosyntec Consultants
  • Novel Riverbank Cap for Controlling Petroleum LNAPL Sheen and Dissolved-phase Constituent Discharge, Author: Keith Sheets, Jacobs

Panel 6: Planning for Success: RD/RA Project Management Lessons Learned
Moderator: Kate Garufi, EPA Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation

  • The New Normal - Planning for Sediment Project Water Management Considering Climate Change, Author: Cannon Silver, CDM Smith
  • Partnering Success & Lessons Learned at the Former Zephyr Oil Refinery Project Site, Author: Kevin Kowalk, EA Engineering, Science and Technology, Inc., PBC
  • Eagle Mine Superfund Site Water Treatment Plant: Challenges and Lessons Learned, Author: David Heinze, Ramboll

FRTR at 30 Years: A Retrospective of Applied Innovative Technologies for Successful Site Remediation

The Fall 2020 Meeting of the Federal Remediation Technologies Roundtable (FRTR) will be held as a webinar session on Thursday, Nov. 18, 2020. As always, FRTR meetings are open to the public.

FRTR's objectives for this meeting are to:
  1. Provide a retrospective on 30 years of interagency collaboration, technology transfer and advocacy by FRTR to advance technology innovation for site remediation.

  2. Highlight current FRTR initiatives in technology transfer and applied innovative technology that are contributing to successful site remediation.

Local Governments and Superfund Sites - Successful Superfund Site Redevelopment Strategies & Tools for Local Governments and Communities

Local governments can play a critical role in the redevelopment of Superfund sites bringing jobs, tax benefits, recreation, affordable housing and a revitalized sense of community. However, local governments can be reluctant to play an active part in redevelopment efforts due to feeling overwhelmed on how to start or what to do. Also, concerns about potential CERCLA liability at Superfund sites may discourage local governments from this role. This session will explore how Superfund liability protections and EPA's enforcement policies protect local governments during the acquisition, cleanup, redevelopment, and reuse of Superfund sites. Speakers will address EPA's newest policies directly addressing the Superfund liability concerns of local governments. Speakers will also highlight real-world case examples where local governments overcame Superfund liability concerns to facilitate the cleanup, redevelopment, and reuse of contaminated properties in their communities.

Superfund Research Program Progress in Research Webinar Part 1: Metals

The NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) Progress in Research webinar series highlights promising research from SRP Centers awarded grants in 2020. In this session, awardees from Harvard School of Public Health, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, and University of Arizona will describe their research projects, accomplishments, and next steps.

The Harvard School of Public Health Center, "Metals and Metal Mixtures: Cognitive Aging, Remediation, and Exposure Sources (MEMCARE)," focuses on understanding the effects of exposure to heavy metals (Pb, As, Mn, Cd, Cr, and Se) and metal mixtures on late-life cognitive health. Center scientists also conduct research on remediation strategies for these exposures to reduce the risk of cognitive decline and memory loss in older populations.

The University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill SRP Center works to address public health challenges related to inorganic arsenic (iAs) contamination of private drinking water wells. Their research explores the biological mechanisms and susceptibility factors underlying diseases associated with iAs exposure, with a focus on diabetes. They also investigate methods for predicting well water contamination by arsenic and other toxic metals, along with removal strategies. Center scientists hope to develop interventions to reduce the prevalence of iAs-associated diabetes and other diseases.

The University of Arizona SRP Center, "Exposures, Health Impacts, and Risk for Mine Waste Contamination," is addressing the unique human health risks encountered in the U.S. Southwest, where distinct geologic and climatic attributes affect human health and exposures to a variety of toxicants, especially arsenic. Arsenic exposure has been linked to the development of diabetes which is especially prevalent in vulnerable populations residing near metal-mining sites. Center scientists are investigating how chronic exposure to arsenic-containing mine waste contributes to the development of diabetes and how exposure can be prevented through a combination of innovations related to the characterization of legacy mine sites and remediation strategies, data science interoperability, and community-engaged health promotion.

Superfund Research Program Progress in Research Webinar Part 2: Legacy and Emerging Contaminants (PAHs, PCBs, PFAS)

The NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) Progress in Research webinar series highlights promising research from SRP Centers awarded grants in 2020. In this session, awardees from University of Kentucky, Oregon State University, and Baylor College of Medicine will describe their research projects, accomplishments, and next steps.

The University of Kentucky SRP Center, "Nutrition and Superfund Chemical Toxicity," explores human health challenges arising from exposure to halogenated organic substances such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethene, and per- and polyfluoralkyl substances (PFAS). They conduct research on lifestyle changes such as nutrition and exercise and the relationship with pollutant exposure and disease risk. Center scientists also study remediation systems and engineering solutions for toxicant removal. The goal is to develop prevention strategies for diseases associated with chlorinated organic contaminants through a combination of enhanced remediation and healthy lifestyle components.

The Oregon State University SRP Center, "PAHs: New Technologies and Emerging Health Risks," investigates polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) mixtures before and after remediation. Center scientists work to track PAH movement through the environment, measure PAH exposure in individuals located near contaminated sites, predict the products of PAH transformation during remediation, determine the toxicity of complex PAH mixtures, and link PAH exposure to health outcomes.

The Baylor College of Medicine SRP Center, "PAHs: Ultrasensitive Detection, Early-Life Exposures - Clinical Outcomes (Preterm Births, Chronic Lung Disease, and Neurocognitive Deficits), Prevention and Remediation," works in Harris County, Texas to explore maternal exposure to PAHs and the increased risk of preterm birth. They are investigating the molecular mechanisms behind the increased preterm birth risk after maternal exposure to PAH mixtures. Center scientists are also working to develop methods for detecting PAH-based compounds in air, water, and soil, remediation technologies to treat contaminated sediment, and strategies to prevent and reduce the health burden associated with PAH exposure.

Superfund Research Program Progress in Research Webinar Part 3: Vulnerable Populations

The NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) Progress in Research webinar series highlights promising research from SRP Centers awarded grants in 2020. In this session, awardees from Northeastern University and University of Alabama at Birmingham will describe their research projects, accomplishments, and next steps.

The Northeastern University SRP Center, "Puerto Rico Testsite for Exploring Contamination Threats (PROTECT)," conducts research on pregnant mothers in Puerto Rico and the relationship between contaminant exposures in drinking water, socioeconomic factors, and adverse pregnancy outcomes. They study a variety of toxicants such as chlorinated volatile organic compounds, phthalates, metals, pesticides, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and the mechanisms by which these chemicals can contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes. Center scientists also investigate how extreme weather events can exacerbate exposures and work to develop methods to reduce exposure risk.

The University of Alabama-Birmingham SRP Center, "Impact of Airborne Heavy Metals on Lung Disease and the Environment," studies airborne heavy metal pollution and its impact on respiratory health in the area surrounding the 35th Avenue Superfund site in downtown Birmingham. This community is predominantly African American and has higher levels of chronic lung diseases compared to neighboring control areas irrespective of smoking, socioeconomic status, or demographics. Center scientists are developing tools to measure toxicants in the field, studying the efficacy of materials for contaminant removal, and working to understand the connections between environmental degradation and lung health.

Superfund Research Program Progress in Research Webinar Part 4: Emerging Exposures

The NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) Progress in Research webinar series highlights promising research from SRP Centers awarded grants in 2020. In this session, awardees from North Carolina State University, University of Iowa, and Louisiana State University will describe their research projects, accomplishments, and next steps.

The North Carolina State University SRP Center, "Center for Environmental and Health Effects of PFAS," focuses on per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) which are ubiquitous in the environment and have been associated with health effects such as cancer and thyroid, liver, and immune system toxicity. Despite this, these compounds have not been well-studied. Center scientists are investigating human exposure levels to PFAS in impacted areas, PFAS toxicity and the underlying mechanisms behind reduced thyroid and immune function, the potential for PFAS bioaccumulation, and effective remediation approaches for PFAS contamination.

The University of Iowa SRP (ISRP) Center, "Airborne PCBs: Sources, Exposures, Toxicities, Remediation," explores polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and the health impacts stemming from inhalation of these toxic chemicals. Center scientists focus on neurodevelopmental and metabolic effects, particularly in adolescents, and the relationship to novel PCB exposure pathways in buildings such as schools. They aim to identify the mechanisms behind PCB interference with lipid metabolism, define the specific environments that contribute to inhalation exposure and its importance compared to dietary exposure, and develop cost-effective strategies to remove or reduce emissions.

The Louisiana State University SRP Center, "Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals (EPFRs)," studies an emerging class of contaminants which are produced during thermal treatment of hazardous wastes and have been shown to induce cardiac and pulmonary dysfunction in exposed populations. They are investigating mechanisms of EPFR-induced health impacts, determining how EPFRs form, stabilize, and decay, and demonstrating a link between EPFR exposure and poor respiratory health in children. The research goal is to understand how to attenuate EPFR formation, facilitate EPFR decay, and limit exposure to EPFRs.
Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Characterization and remediation of contaminated groundwater in fractured rock has not been conducted or studied as broadly as groundwater at unconsolidated porous media sites. This unfamiliarity and lack of experience can make fractured rock sites perplexing. This situation is especially true in portions of the U.S. where bedrock aquifers are a primary source of drinking and process water, and demands on water are increasing. As a result, remedial activities often default to containment of contaminant plumes, point of use treatment and long-term monitoring rather than active reduction of risk. However, this attitude does not incorporate recent advances in the science and technology of fractured rock site characterization and remediation.
The basis for this training course is the ITRC guidance: Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock. The purpose of this guidance is to dispel the belief that fractured rock sites are too complex to characterize and remediate. The physical, chemical and contaminant transport concepts in fractured rock have similarities to unconsolidated porous media, yet there are important differences. These differences are the focus of this guidance.

By participating in this training class, you should learn to:
  • Use ITRC's Fractured Rock Document to guide your decision making so you can:
  • Develop quality Conceptual Site Models (CSMs) for fractured rock sites
  • Set realistic remedial objectives
  • Select the best remedial options
  • Monitor remedial progress and assess results
  • Value an interdisciplinary site team approach to bring collective expertise to improve decision making and to have confidence when going beyond containment and monitoring - - to actually remediating fractured rock sites.
Case studies of successful fractured rock remediation are presented to provide examples of how fractured rock sites can be evaluated and available tools applied to characterization and remediation.
Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock prior to attending the class.

Geospatial Analysis for Optimization at Environmental Sites

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Optimization activities can improve performance, increase monitoring efficiency, and support contaminated site decisions. Project managers can use geospatial analysis for evaluation of optimization opportunities. Unlike traditional statistical analysis, geospatial methods incorporate the spatial and temporal dependence between nearby data points, which is an important feature of almost all data collected as part of an environmental investigation. The results of geospatial analyses add additional lines of evidence to decision making in optimization opportunities in environmental sites across all project life cycle stages (release detection, site characterization, remediation, monitoring and closure) in soil, groundwater or sediment remediation projects for different sizes and types of sites.

The purpose of ITRC's Geospatial Analysis for Optimization at Environmental Sites (GRO-1) guidance document and this associated training is to explain, educate, and train state regulators and other practitioners in understanding and using geospatial analyses to evaluate optimization opportunities at environmental sites. With the ITRC GRO-1 web-based guidance document and this associated training class, project managers will be able to:
  • Evaluate available data and site needs to determine if geospatial analyses are appropriate for a given site
  • For a project and specific lifecycle stage, identify optimization questions where geospatial methods can contribute to better decision making
  • For a project and optimization question(s), select appropriate geospatial method(s) and software using the geospatial analysis work flow, tables and flow charts in the guidance document
  • With geospatial analyses results (note: some geospatial analyses may be performed by the project manager, but many geospatial analyses will be performed by technical experts), explain what the results mean and appropriately apply in decision making
  • Use the project manager's tool box, interactive flow charts for choosing geospatial methods and review checklist to use geospatial analyses confidently in decision making

Groundwater Statistics for Environmental Project Managers

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Statistical techniques may be used throughout the process of cleaning up contaminated groundwater. It is challenging for practitioners, who are not experts in statistics, to interpret, and use statistical techniques. ITRC developed the Technical and Regulatory Web-based Guidance on Groundwater Statistics and Monitoring Compliance (GSMC-1, 2013, http://www.itrcweb.org/gsmc-1/) and this associated training specifically for environmental project managers who review or use statistical calculations for reports, who make recommendations or decisions based on statistics, or who need to demonstrate compliance for groundwater projects. The training class will encourage and support project managers and others who are not statisticians to:

ITRC's Technical and Regulatory Web-based Guidance on Groundwater Statistics and Monitoring Compliance (GSMC-1, 2013) and this associated training bring clarity to the planning, implementation, and communication of groundwater statistical methods and should lead to greater confidence and transparency in the use of groundwater statistics for site management.

Optimizing Injection Strategies and In situ Remediation Performance

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council In situ remediation technologies using amendment injections have advanced to mainstream acceptance and offer a competitive advantage over many forms of ex situ treatment of soil and groundwater. Developing a detailed site-specific strategy is absolutely critical to the success of such in situ remedies. These strategies include conducting a thorough site characterization that will allow development of a detailed Conceptual Site Model (CSM) to guide critical analysis of subsurface features and improving remediation effectiveness. In the interest of developing expedited solutions, many past in situ remediation projects have been executed based on an incomplete understanding of the hydrogeology, geology, and contaminant distribution and mass. Some of these sites have undergone multiple rounds of in situ injections but have not advanced to closure. Better strategies and minimum design standards are required to decrease uncertainty and improve remedy effectiveness.

In an effort to overcome these challenges and improve the effectiveness of in situ remediation using injected amendments, ITRC developed the guidance: Optimizing Injection Strategies and In Situ Remediation Performance (OIS-ISRP-1). The guidance and this associated training course identify challenges that may impede or limit remedy effectiveness and discuss the potential optimization strategies, and specific actions that can be pursued, to improve the performance of in situ remediation by:
  • Refining and evaluating remedial design site characterization data;
  • Selecting the correct amendment;
  • Choosing delivery methods for site-specific conditions;
  • Creating design specifications;
  • Conducting performance evaluations, and
  • Optimizing underperforming in situ remedies.
The target audience for this guidance and training course is: environmental consultants, responsible parties, federal and state regulators, as well as community and tribal stakeholders. This training will support users in efficiently and confidently applying the guidance at their remediation sites. An optimization case study is shared to illustrate the use of the associated guidance document.

Prior to attending the training class, participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, Optimizing Injection Strategies and In Situ Remediation Performance (OIS-ISRP-1) as well as to be familiar with the characterization process described in Integrated DNAPL Site Strategy (ITRC 2011c).

Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Chemical contaminants in soil and groundwater can volatilize into soil gas and migrate through unsaturated soils of the vadose zone. Vapor intrusion (VI) occurs when these vapors migrate upward into overlying buildings through cracks and gaps in the building floors, foundations, and utility conduits, and contaminate indoor air. If present at sufficiently high concentrations, these vapors may present a threat to the health and safety of building occupants. Petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) is a subset of VI and is the process by which volatile petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) released as vapors from light nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPL), petroleum-contaminated soils, or petroleum-contaminated groundwater migrate through the vadose zone and into overlying buildings. Fortunately, in the case of PHC vapors, this migration is often limited by microorganisms that are normally present in soil. The organisms consume these chemicals, reducing them to nontoxic end products through the process of biodegradation. The extent and rate to which this natural biodegradation process occurs is strongly influenced by the concentration of the vapor source, the distance the vapors must travel through soil from the source to potential receptors, and the presence of oxygen (O2) in the subsurface environment between the source and potential receptors.

The ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance Web-Based Document, Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management (PVI-1, 2014) and this associated Internet-based training provides regulators and practitioners with consensus information based on empirical data and recent research to support PVI decision making under different regulatory frameworks. The PVI assessment strategy described in this guidance document enables confident decision making that protects human health for various types of petroleum sites and multiple PHC compounds. This guidance provides a comprehensive methodology for screening, investigating, and managing potential PVI sites and is intended to promote the efficient use of resources and increase confidence in decision making when evaluating the potential for vapor intrusion at petroleum-contaminated sites. By using the ITRC guidance document, the vapor intrusion pathway can be eliminated from further investigation at many sites where soil or groundwater is contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons or where LNAPL is present.

After attending this ITRC Internet-based training, participants should be able to:
  • Determine when and how to use the ITRC PVI document at their sites
  • Describe the important role of biodegradation impacts on the PVI pathway (in contrast to chlorinated solvent contaminated sites)
  • Value a PVI conceptual site model (CSM) and list its key components
  • Apply the ITRC PVI 8 step decision process to screen sites for the PVI pathway and determine actions to take if a site does not initially screen out, (e.g., site investigation, modeling, and vapor control and site management)
  • Access fact sheets to support community engagement activities at each step in the process
For reference during the training class, participants should have a copy of the flowcharts, Figures 1-2, 3-2, and 4-1 from the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance Web-Based Document, Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management (PVI-1, 2014) and are available as a 3-page PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/PVI/ITRC-PVI-FlowCharts.pdf


ITRC also offers a 2-day PVI focused classroom training at locations across the US. The classroom training provides participants the opportunity to learn more in-depth information about the PVI pathway and practice applying the ITRC PVI guidance document with a diverse group of environmental professionals. Learn more at the ITRC PVI classroom training page.

TPH Risk Evaluation at Petroleum-Contaminated Sites

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Remediation at petroleum release sites is often infeasible for technical or cost reasons. Many of these sites could be depleted in typical indicator compounds, such as BTEXN, but still heavily contaminated in terms of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH). The traditional indicator compound approach for managing petroleum contaminants may not fully identify short- and long-term potential environmental concerns, can create delays in project schedules and cost overages for sub-surface utility work or redevelopment. It is important to consider a comprehensive cumulative risk-based approach to more effectively incorporate TPH data in addition to traditional BTEXN data for cleanup and long-term management decisions.

The basis for this training course is the ITRC guidance: TPH Risk Evaluation at Petroleum-Contaminated Sites (TPHRisk-1, 2018). The guidance builds on long-standing and current research and experience, and presents the current science for evaluating TPH risk at petroleum-contaminated sites. The methods and procedures to evaluate human and ecological risk and establish cleanup requirements in the various media at petroleum release sites will assist decision makers in developing and implementing a technically defensible approach. In addition, the guidance provides information and supplemental references to assist practitioners and project managers in the assessment of fate, transport, exposure, and toxicity of TPH. The guidance users will also gain information that may be used in conjunction with classic tiered approaches for risk-based decision making (ASTM 2015b, ITRC Risk 3 2015), including modifications in the assessment and remedial-decision and regulatory framework for TPH impacts through direct comparison to screening levels, site-specific modification of screening levels, and complete site-specific risk assessment for sources, receptors, and pathways, where appropriate.

The target audience for this guidance and training course is:
  • Regulators and Program Managers interested in knowing how site management decisions can influence the TPH risk evaluation process.
  • Risk assessors new to TPH data or those who want additional knowledge and training in the current methods and common practices for collecting and using TPH data in assessments to more accurately determine human health and/or ecological risks at petroleum-contaminated sites.
  • Stakeholders who are either engaged in redevelopment at former petroleum release sites or folks who are involved in community engagement and revitalization activities.
As a participant in this training you should learn to:
  • Recognize the ITRC document as a go-to resource for evaluating TPH risk at petroleum-contaminated sites
  • Recognize how TPH -impacted media interacts with the environment and changes over time
  • Select appropriate analytic method(s) to match site objectives
  • Apply the decision framework to determine when a site-specific target level may be more appropriate than a generic screening level for TPH
Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, TPH Risk Evaluation at Petroleum-Contaminated Sites (TPHRisk-1, 2018) prior to attending the class.

Issues and Options in Human Health Risk Assessment - A Resource When Alternatives to Default Parameters and Scenarios are Proposed

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Many state and local regulatory agencies responsible for the cleanup of chemicals released to the environment have adopted regulations, guidance and policies that define default approaches, scenarios, and parameters as a starting point for risk assessment and the development of risk-based screening values. Regulatory project managers and decision makers, however, may not have specific guidance when alternative approaches, scenarios, and parameters are proposed for site-specific risk assessments, and are faced with difficult technical issues when evaluating these site-specific risk assessments. This ITRC web-based document is a resource for project managers and decision makers to help evaluate alternatives to risk assessment default approaches, scenarios and parameters.

ITRC's Decision Making at Contaminated Sites: Issues and Options in Human Health Risk Assessment (RISK-3, 2015) guidance document is different from existing ITRC Risk Assessment guidance and other state and federal resources because it identifies commonly encountered issues and discusses options in risk assessment when applying site-specific alternatives to defaults. In addition, the document includes links to resources and tools that provide even more detailed information on the specific issues and potential options. The ITRC Risk Assessment Team believes that state regulatory agencies and other organizations can use the RISK-3 document as a resource or reference to supplement their existing guidance. Community members and other stakeholders also may find this document helpful in understanding and using risk assessment information.

After participating in this ITRC training course, the learner will be able to apply ITRC's Decision Making at Contaminated Sites: Issues and Options in Human Health Risk (RISK-3, 2015) document when developing or reviewing site-specific risk assessments by:
  • Identifying common issues encountered when alternatives to default parameters and scenarios are proposed during the planning, data evaluation, toxicity, exposure assessment, and risk characterization and providing possible options for addressing these issues
  • Recognizing the value of proper planning and the role of stakeholders in the development and review of risk assessments
  • Providing information (that includes links to additional resources and tools) to support decision making when alternatives to default approaches, scenarios and parameters are proposed
ITRC offers additional documents and training on risk management. ITRC's Use of Risk Assessment in Management of Contaminated Sites (RISK-2, 2008) and associated Internet-based training archive highlight variation of risk-based site management and describes how to improve the use of risk assessment for making better risk management decisions. ITRC's Examination of Risk-Based Screening Values and Approaches of Selected States (RISK-1, 2005) and associated Internet-based training archive focus on the process by which risk-based levels are derived in different states.