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CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatUnlocking Brightfields Potential: S...

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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatITRC 1,4-Dioxane: Science, Characte...

1,4-Dioxane: Science, Characterization & Analysis, and Remediation
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatSite Redevelopment? There's an App ...

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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatITRC Vapor Intrusion Mitigation (VI...

Vapor Intrusion Mitigation (VIM-1) - A Two Part Series
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Federal Facilities Online Academy: Federal Facility Five-Year Review

Federal Facility Five-Year Review Webinar is a two-hour webinar course that provides an overview of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) five-year reviews. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:
  • Understand Five-Year Review purpose and regulatory context
  • Learn how to prepare and conduct a five-year review
  • Identify the information and data needed to support a protectiveness statement
  • Address emerging contaminants and options available to ensure that the federal agencies address these contaminants
  • Identify the different scenarios when EPA makes an independent finding of the protectiveness of the remedy
  • Learn about similarities and differences between federal and private site five-year reviews

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, case studies, and quizzes. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course are federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding the CERCLA process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Coordinating with Tribes at Federal Facilities

Coordinating with Tribes at Federal Facilities is a two-hour webinar course that will provide an overview of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) policy on consultation and coordination with Indian Tribes at federal facilities. This webinar will also provide tips on how to work more collaboratively during this process. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:
  • Identify EPA processes and policies for interacting with the Tribes;
  • Understand the roles of EPA and tribal governments in Federal Facility clean ups;
  • Learn about the Federal Facilities Restoration and Reuse Office (FFRRO); and,
  • Discover EPA resources and tools available to assist Federal Facilities in building partnerships with the Tribes;

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, group discussions, and case studies. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Determining Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) in RODs

Determining ARARs at Federal Facility Sites is a two-hour webinar course that will highlight how to determine Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) in decision-documents based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance, identify commonly used ARARs, and when to involve partners. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:
  • Understand the general procedures for ARAR identification, analysis, and documentation;
  • Learn about ARARs under Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Section 121(d) and associated EPA guidance;
  • Identify the three types of ARARs and how they are determined; and,
  • Explore CERCLA ARAR waiver criteria and the six waivers identified under CERCLA 121(d).

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture and quizzes. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of ARARs and the CERCLA process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Record of Decision (RODs) and More at Federal Facilities

RODs [Records of Decision] and More at Federal Facilities is a two-hour webinar course that will provide an overview of how early and interim actions, adaptive management, RODs, Explanations of Significant Differences (ESDs), and ROD Amendments are used at Federal Facilities. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:
  • Understand how removal actions, sampling and analysis plans, and decision documents are used at Federal Facilities;
  • Learn about the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Department of Energy (DoE) Joint Policy Memo;
  • Identify how Interim Actions can be used as part of an overall cleanup strategy; and,
  • Learn the process for changing remedies after a ROD is issued.

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, group discussions, case studies, and quizzes. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Military Munitions Policy Overview

Military Munitions Policy Webinar is a two-hour webinar course that provides an overview of the Department of Defense (DoD) Military Munitions Response Program (MMRP), munitions policies, and how the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) is applied to munitions sites. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:
  • Learn about DoD MMRP;
  • Understand the CERCLA process as applied to a munitions site;
  • Understand munitions policies; and,
  • Explore EPA Munitions Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, case studies, and quizzes. The target audience for this course are federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of munitions and the CERCLA process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Land Use and Onsite/Offsite Determinations

Determining Land Use and Onsite/Offsite Determinations is a two-hour webinar course that provides an overview of land use determinations under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). Reasonably anticipated future land use at CERCLA sites is important in determining the appropriate extent of remediation. Onsite and offsite determinations impact the need for permits and offsite transfer of CERCLA wastes. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:
  • Identify factors that influence land use determinations under CERCLA;
  • Explore Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance and policy related to land use determinations;
  • Learn about onsite permit requirements and exemptions at Federal Facilities; and,
  • Understand off-site determinations and the Off-Site Rule and how these differ from on-site determinations.

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture and group discussion. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of land use and the CERCLA process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Resolving Issues before Formal Dispute

Resolving Issues Before Formal Dispute is a two-hour webinar course that identifies less formal options to address conflict before going to dispute under a federal facility agreement. This webinar provides project management tips and techniques to address disagreements early in the process . By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:
  • Identify factors that contribute to conflict when working with team members from different agencies;
  • Learn how to prepare a team to handle conflict;
  • Explore tips and techniques to improve communication and come to resolution; and,
  • Understand when formal dispute should be considered.

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, group discussions, case studies, and quizzes. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: RCRA/CERCLA Integration

RCRA and CERCLA Integration at Federal Facilities is a two-hour webinar course that will provide an overview of how the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) can be integrated at Federal Facilities through use of Federal Facility Agreements, regulator coordination, and lead regulator approach. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:
  • Learn about Federal Facility Agreements and how they identify RCRA and CERCLA roles and responsibilities;
  • Explore relevant memos and policies addressing RCRA and CERCLA coordination; and,
  • Become familiar with some RCRA policies that apply to CERCLA wastes.

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, case studies, and quizzes. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of RCRA and CERCLA. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Groundwater Policy Overview

Groundwater Policy and Federal Facilities Overview is a two-hour webinar course that provides an overview of U.S Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater policies and guidance with emphasis on cleanups at federal facilities. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:
  • Identify EPA groundwater policies;
  • Understand groundwater classification and beneficial use in restoration objectives;
  • Understand nature and extent considerations from groundwater contaminant plumes;
  • Explore applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) commonly associated with groundwater remedies;
  • Identify groundwater considerations for monitored natural attenuation (MNA), institutional controls, and technical impracticability waivers; and,
  • Discover information on major groundwater policies from other federal agencies, such as Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Energy (DoE).

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture and quizzes. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Community Involvement at Federal Facilities

Community Involvement at Federal Facilities is a two-hour webinar course that focuses on community involvement requirements, resources, and techniques available for Federal Facilities being cleaned up at National Priorities List (NPL) sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). By taking the course, participants will achieve the following objectives:
  • Learn about community involvement requirements under CERCLA;
  • Understand the roles of the lead federal agency and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in public involvement at Federal Facilities;
  • Discover resources and tools available for community involvement activities;
  • Explore community involvement techniques and approaches that can be used at Superfund sites; and,
  • Identify community involvement opportunities throughout the Superfund process at Federal Facilities.

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, case studies, and group discussions. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of the CERCLA process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Role of Superfund Performance Measures

Role of Superfund Performance Measures is a two-hour webinar course that will identify the role of performance measures, including environmental indicators, how to justify their status, and how to achieve an under-control status at Superfund sites. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:
  • Discover the origin and role of Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) Measures;
  • Explore the different types of internal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) planning targets reported through the Superfund Enterprise Management System (SEMs) database; and,
  • Learn about Environmental Indicators for Human Exposure and Groundwater Migration and how they are determined.

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, group discussion, and quizzes. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Introduction to Groundwater High-Resolution Site Characterization

Introduction to Groundwater High-Resolution Site Characterization (HRSC): This live two-part webinar series is an introduction to HRSC. The introductory sessions address the following technical content:

  • Defining HRSC and how it is implemented
  • Explaining the need for and benefits of HRSC
  • Reviewing the eight components of the CSM and how HRSC informs the CSM
  • Refresher of basic hydrologic properties and how these properties vary within geologic systems
  • Refresher of the principles of contaminant fate and transport and how these characteristics affect the distribution of contaminants in the aquifer
  • Conceptual site models of fate and transport in unconsolidated and fractured rock
  • Introduction to the challenges of characterizing contaminant distribution in fractured rock

After taking this webinar series, participants will be prepared to dig deeper into the uncertainties created by traditional sampling approaches and learn how HRSC can address these challenges in the in-person HRSC course.

Each webinar will be 2.5 hours long. The recommended audience includes EPA, federal, state, tribal and private industry technical project managers, practitioners and other stakeholders involved in groundwater investigation and remediation.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS FOR THOSE TAKING THE THREE DAY IN PERSON CEC GROUNDWATER HRSC COURSE: This live two-part webinar series is a prerequisite for those wanting to attend the three-day in-person CERCLA Education Center (CEC) Groundwater HRSC course. If you are not able to attend the live webinar series, it will be recorded and a link to the recording will be provided to those registered to attend the classroom training that will allow you to listen at your convenience prior to the classroom delivery. If you have any questions regarding the webinars, please feel free to contact Jodi McCarty, ICF at jodi.mccarty@icf.com.

Introduction to Groundwater High-Resolution Site Characterization

Introduction to Groundwater High-Resolution Site Characterization (HRSC): This live two-part webinar series is an introduction to HRSC. The introductory sessions address the following technical content:

  • Defining HRSC and how it is implemented
  • Explaining the need for and benefits of HRSC
  • Reviewing the eight components of the CSM and how HRSC informs the CSM
  • Refresher of basic hydrologic properties and how these properties vary within geologic systems
  • Refresher of the principles of contaminant fate and transport and how these characteristics affect the distribution of contaminants in the aquifer
  • Conceptual site models of fate and transport in unconsolidated and fractured rock
  • Introduction to the challenges of characterizing contaminant distribution in fractured rock

After taking this webinar series, participants will be prepared to dig deeper into the uncertainties created by traditional sampling approaches and learn how HRSC can address these challenges in the in-person HRSC course.

Each webinar will be 2.5 hours long. The recommended audience includes EPA, federal, state, tribal and private industry technical project managers, practitioners and other stakeholders involved in groundwater investigation and remediation.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS FOR THOSE TAKING THE THREE DAY IN PERSON CEC GROUNDWATER HRSC COURSE: This live two-part webinar series is a prerequisite for those wanting to attend the three-day in-person CERCLA Education Center (CEC) Groundwater HRSC course. If you are not able to attend the live webinar series, it will be recorded and a link to the recording will be provided to those registered to attend the classroom training that will allow you to listen at your convenience prior to the classroom delivery. If you have any questions regarding the webinars, please feel free to contact Jodi McCarty, ICF at jodi.mccarty@icf.com.

Toward Sustainability of Passive Treatment in Legacy Mining Watersheds: Operational Performance and System Maintenance

For 40 years, passive treatment systems (PTS) have been the preferred option at many abandoned mining sites, in part due to presumptions of continuous water quality improvement performance and limited operation and maintenance commitments. However, documentation to support these presumptions is typically lacking. Long-term regular performance evaluation (12 years) was conducted for a large, multi-process unit PTS receiving artesian-flowing lead-zinc mine waters (≈1000 m3/day) at the Tar Creek Superfund site, Tri-State Mining District, USA. Since 2008, the Mayer Ranch PTS has consistently retained >95% of targeted metal mass. The webinar will share how PTS life can be extended if the system is properly designed, sized and preserved with regular, periodic and rehabilitative maintenance and monitoring. The webinar will also highlight how the project was managed by Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality, and how project administration and building partnerships has been essential to the success of the PTS on the site.

Unlocking Brightfields Potential: State Programs to Encourage Renewable Energy Siting on Contaminated Lands - RE-Powering America's Land Initiative

Do you have a need to find suitable sites for renewable energy projects in your state? Are you interested in learning more about best practices for states that have used landfills, brownfields, mines, and other contaminated lands to site renewable energy? Almost without exception, states with the most renewable project development on contaminated lands, landfills, and mine sites have designed and implemented longstanding, state-specific programs targeted at such sites. These states continue to adapt programs to support environmental, land reuse, and economic policy goals in their jurisdictions. Many other states, as well as local communities and utilities, are considering similar programs to expand contaminated site reuse and steer renewable development away from greenfield sites and agricultural lands.

EPA's RE-Powering America's Land Initiative ("RE-Powering") is hosting a webinar to help you learn about state-based programs to increase renewable energy projects on landfills, brownfields, mines, and other contaminated lands. In the webinar, you will learn about common types of state programs, program impacts, steps to select and design successful programs, and program implementation tips.

The webinar will feature a panel with agency staff from three leading states who will discuss how they have created and managed successful programs and provide tips for success. It will also highlight free RE-Powering resources - a report on how to select and design state programs and a map of relevant programs - where participants can learn much more on the topic.

Site Redevelopment? There's an App for That - Superfund Redevelopment Mapper Training

EPA's new Superfund Redevelopment Mapper is an interactive tool that provides information related to reuse and redevelopment on and near Superfund sites. This webinar will review how the tool highlights key data stakeholders need to plan for future Superfund site use. Data layers in the tool include key environmental, population and infrastructure data for identifying and analyzing redevelopment opportunities and potential environmental justice concerns at or near Superfund sites. This webinar will include an interactive training on how to use the tool in a variety of scenarios.
Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


1,4-Dioxane: Science, Characterization & Analysis, and Remediation

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council 1,4-Dioxane has seen widespread use as a solvent stabilizer since the 1950s. The widespread use of solvents through the 1980s suggests its presence at thousands of solvent sites in the US; however, it is not always a standard compound in typical analytical suites for hazardous waste sites, so it previously was overlooked. The U.S. EPA has classified 1,4-dioxane as "likely to be carcinogenic to humans." Some states have devised health standards or regulatory guidelines for drinking water and groundwater standards; these are often sub-part per billion values. These low standards present challenges for analysis, characterization, and remediation of 1,4-dioxane. The ITRC team created multiple tools and documents that provide information to assist all interested stakeholders in understanding this contaminate and for making informed, educated decisions.

The 1,4-Dioxane: Science, Characterization & Analysis, and Remediation training is a series of six (6) modules. The six individual modules will be presented together live, and then archived on the ITRC 1,4-Dioxane training webpage for on demand listening.

The modular 1,4-Dioxane training series provides an overview of 1,4-dioxane and presenting six sections from the ITRC guidance document (1,4d-1, 2021):
  • History of Use and Potential Sources (Sect 1)
  • Regulatory Framework (Sect 2)
  • Fate and Transport (Sect 3)
  • Sampling and Analysis (Sect 4)
  • Toxicity and Risk Assessment (Sect 5)
  • Remediation and Treatment Technologies (Sect 6)
After the six-part 1,4-Dioxane: Science, Characterization & Analysis, and Remediation series, you should understand:
  • The history of 1,4-dioxane manufacturing and usage and the potential sources of releases of 1,4-dioxane to the environment.
  • Primary state and U.S. federal regulatory programs of relevance to 1,4-dioxane
  • Key physical/chemical properties, and fate and transport processes that are relevant for 1,4-dioxane
  • Benefits and limitations of the available analytical methods
  • Risk drivers for human health and how ecological risk compares
  • How/when/why different treatment technologies are appropriate

We encourage you to use the ITRC 1,4-Dioxane products (14d-1) and these training modules to learn about 1,4-dioxane and how you can apply these best practices to improve decision-making at your sites.
For regulators and other government agency staff, this understanding of 1,4-dioxane can be incorporated into your own programs. This training summarizes the current understanding of 1,4-dioxane. While the training makes every effort to keep the information accessible to a wide audience, it is assumed that the participants will have some basic technical understanding of chemistry, environmental sciences, and risk assessment. As with other emerging contaminants, our understanding of 1,4-dioxane continues to advance. This training provides the participants with information on areas where the science is evolving and where uncertainty persists.

Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council

Characterization and remediation of contaminated groundwater in fractured rock has not been conducted or studied as broadly as groundwater at unconsolidated porous media sites. This unfamiliarity and lack of experience can make fractured rock sites perplexing. This situation is especially true in portions of the U.S. where bedrock aquifers are a primary source of drinking and process water, and demands on water are increasing. As a result, remedial activities often default to containment of contaminant plumes, point of use treatment and long-term monitoring rather than active reduction of risk. However, this attitude does not incorporate recent advances in the science and technology of fractured rock site characterization and remediation.

The basis for this training course is the ITRC guidance: Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock. The purpose of this guidance is to dispel the belief that fractured rock sites are too complex to characterize and remediate. The physical, chemical and contaminant transport concepts in fractured rock have similarities to unconsolidated porous media, yet there are important differences. These differences are the focus of this guidance.

By participating in this training class, you should learn to:

  • Use ITRC's Fractured Rock Document to guide your decision making so you can:
    • Develop quality Conceptual Site Models (CSMs) for fractured rock sites

    • Set realistic remedial objectives

    • Select the best remedial options

    • Monitor remedial progress and assess results
  • Value an interdisciplinary site team approach to bring collective expertise to improve decision making and to have confidence when going beyond containment and monitoring - - to actually remediating fractured rock sites.

Case studies of successful fractured rock remediation are presented to provide examples of how fractured rock sites can be evaluated and available tools applied to characterization and remediation.

Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock prior to attending the class.

Connecting the Science to Managing LNAPL Sites a 3 Part Series: Part 1

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Connecting the Science to Managing LNAPL Sites - 3-Part Series

The newly updated LNAPLs (Light Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids) 3-part training course series is based on the ITRC guidance: LNAPL Site Management: LCSM Evolution, Decision Process, and Remedial Technologies (LNAPL-3, 2018) and focuses on connecting the science to managing LNAPL sites and helping you:
  • Build upon your Understanding of LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface (Part 1)
  • Develop your LNAPL Conceptual Site Model and LNAPL Remedial Goals (Part 2)
  • Select/Implement LNAPL Technologies (Part 3)

After this training series, the expectation is that you will have the skills and understanding to use ITRC science-based resources to improve decision making at your LNAPL sites. For regulators and other government agency staff, this improved understanding can hopefully be incorporated into your own LNAPL programs.

It is recommended that participants have a general understanding of hydrogeology and some familiarity with petroleum contaminated sites. The courses will build on your existing LNAPL knowledge and outline the framework for making LNAPL remediation and management decisions. It is expected that participants will attend this 3-part training series in sequence.

LNAPL Training Part 1: Understanding LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface
Part 1 teaches how LNAPLs behave in the subsurface and examines what controls their behavior. Part 1:
  • Explains what LNAPL data can tell you about the LNAPL and site conditions
  • Covers how that information is applied to the development of an LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM) (Part 2) and LNAPL technology selection (Part 3)

Relevant and practical examples are used to illustrate key concepts.

LNAPL Training Part 2: LNAPL Conceptual Site Models and the LNAPL Decision Process
Part 2 teaches participants how to develop an LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM) and the overall framework for making LNAPL remediation and management decisions. Part 2:
  • Discusses key LNAPL and site data
  • Explains when and why those data may be important
  • Covers how to effectively organize the data into an LCSM

Part 2 also discusses how to address LNAPL concerns by selecting appropriate goals and objectives, choosing applicable technologies, and assigning remedial performance metrics and endpoints.

LNAPL Training Part 3: Using LNAPL Science, the LCSM, and LNAPL Goals to Select an LNAPL Remedial Technology
Part 3 of the training teaches the importance of informed remedial technology selection and appropriate technology application. Part 3:
  • Discusses remedial technology groups
  • Introduces specific and new remedial technologies
  • Reviews the technology selection process, how technologies can be combined to accelerate cleanup, and how the LCSM informs selection

A case study and examples demonstrate the use of these tools for remedial technology selection, implementation, and demonstration of successful remediation.

Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, LNAPL Site Management: LCSM Evolution, Decision Process, and Remedial Technologies (LNAPL-3, 2018), prior to attending the class.

Optimizing Injection Strategies and In situ Remediation Performance

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council In situ remediation technologies using amendment injections have advanced to mainstream acceptance and offer a competitive advantage over many forms of ex situ treatment of soil and groundwater. Developing a detailed site-specific strategy is absolutely critical to the success of such in situ remedies. These strategies include conducting a thorough site characterization that will allow development of a detailed Conceptual Site Model (CSM) to guide critical analysis of subsurface features and improving remediation effectiveness. In the interest of developing expedited solutions, many past in situ remediation projects have been executed based on an incomplete understanding of the hydrogeology, geology, and contaminant distribution and mass. Some of these sites have undergone multiple rounds of in situ injections but have not advanced to closure. Better strategies and minimum design standards are required to decrease uncertainty and improve remedy effectiveness.

In an effort to overcome these challenges and improve the effectiveness of in situ remediation using injected amendments, ITRC developed the guidance: Optimizing Injection Strategies and In Situ Remediation Performance (OIS-ISRP-1). The guidance and this associated training course identify challenges that may impede or limit remedy effectiveness and discuss the potential optimization strategies, and specific actions that can be pursued, to improve the performance of in situ remediation by:
  • Refining and evaluating remedial design site characterization data;
  • Selecting the correct amendment;
  • Choosing delivery methods for site-specific conditions;
  • Creating design specifications;
  • Conducting performance evaluations, and
  • Optimizing underperforming in situ remedies.


The target audience for this guidance and training course is: environmental consultants, responsible parties, federal and state regulators, as well as community and tribal stakeholders. This training will support users in efficiently and confidently applying the guidance at their remediation sites. An optimization case study is shared to illustrate the use of the associated guidance document.

Prior to attending the training class, participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, Optimizing Injection Strategies and In Situ Remediation Performance (OIS-ISRP-1) as well as to be familiar with the characterization process described in Integrated DNAPL Site Strategy (ITRC 2011c).

Sustainable Resilient Remediation (SRR)

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council

Extreme weather events and wildfires are increasing and impacting hazardous waste sites. The primary goal of cleanups, which is protecting human health and the environment, is undermined. Confronted with these risks, environmental professionals should assess, and design remedies that are sustainable and resilient. Sustainable resilient remediation (SRR) is an optimized solution to cleaning up and reusing a hazardous waste site that limits negative environmental impacts, maximizes social and economic benefits, and creates resilience against increasing threats.

The objective of the ITRC Sustainable Resilient Remediation (SRR-1) is to provide resources and tools for regulators, stakeholders, consultants, and responsible parties to help integrate sustainable and resilient practices into remediation projects. This guidance updates the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council's (ITRC) Technical and Regulatory Guidance: Green and Sustainable Remediation: A Practical Framework (ITRC 2011a) and includes a strong resilience component to address the increasing threat of extreme weather events and wildfires. Recommendations for careful and continuous consideration of the social and economic costs and benefits of a cleanup project are included.

Training Objectives


  • Educate participants about available SRR resources and tools
  • Impart evolution from Green and Sustainable Remediation (GSR) to SRR
  • Provide guidance on practical application and implementation of SRR
  • Provide participants with information necessary to navigate the SRR guidance and tools

Training Goals

  • Provide information and resources for the social and economic dimensions of sustainability, including state-of-the-art social and economic evaluation tools
  • Provide a framework illustrating how and why sustainability and resilience should be integrated throughout the remedial project life cycle
  • Offer checklists of key sustainable best management practices to address resilience based on specific vulnerabilities at a site, as well as resources for additional information
  • Present interactive maps with links to available state and federal resources to quickly find examples and best practices from your state or other states and federal agencies
  • Reference case studies illustrating the application of SRR considerations

After the SRR Training, a user will have the tools necessary to understand what SRR is and how it can be used to achieve a sustainable and resilient remediation outcome. This can be accomplished by remediation practitioners applying the principles and practices to a contaminated site and by providing SRR resources to help regulators and stakeholders in the development and review of project documents or submittals.

The intended users of this guidance and training course are those individuals responsible for managing contaminated sites. Users of this training and the associated documents will develop an understanding of SRR and its importance in achieving sustainability and resilience for site remediation. Principals, best practices, resources, and trainer insights will help users conduct SRR tailored to the needs of the sites under their care.

Recommended Reading: Participants are strongly encouraged to review the ITRC Sustainable Resilient Remediation, (SRR-1) document prior to participating in the training class. Also, because SRR-1 is an expansion and update of the concepts developed in Green and Sustainable Remediation: A Practical Framework, GSR-2, review of this document is recommended but is not a prerequisite.

TPH Risk Evaluation at Petroleum-Contaminated Sites

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Remediation at petroleum release sites is often infeasible for technical or cost reasons. Many of these sites could be depleted in typical indicator compounds, such as BTEXN, but still heavily contaminated in terms of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH). The traditional indicator compound approach for managing petroleum contaminants may not fully identify short- and long-term potential environmental concerns, can create delays in project schedules and cost overages for sub-surface utility work or redevelopment. It is important to consider a comprehensive cumulative risk-based approach to more effectively incorporate TPH data in addition to traditional BTEXN data for cleanup and long-term management decisions.

The basis for this training course is the ITRC guidance: TPH Risk Evaluation at Petroleum-Contaminated Sites (TPHRisk-1, 2018). The guidance builds on long-standing and current research and experience, and presents the current science for evaluating TPH risk at petroleum-contaminated sites. The methods and procedures to evaluate human and ecological risk and establish cleanup requirements in the various media at petroleum release sites will assist decision makers in developing and implementing a technically defensible approach. In addition, the guidance provides information and supplemental references to assist practitioners and project managers in the assessment of fate, transport, exposure, and toxicity of TPH. The guidance users will also gain information that may be used in conjunction with classic tiered approaches for risk-based decision making (ASTM 2015b, ITRC Risk 3 2015), including modifications in the assessment and remedial-decision and regulatory framework for TPH impacts through direct comparison to screening levels, site-specific modification of screening levels, and complete site-specific risk assessment for sources, receptors, and pathways, where appropriate.

The target audience for this guidance and training course is:
  • Regulators and Program Managers interested in knowing how site management decisions can influence the TPH risk evaluation process.
  • Risk assessors new to TPH data or those who want additional knowledge and training in the current methods and common practices for collecting and using TPH data in assessments to more accurately determine human health and/or ecological risks at petroleum-contaminated sites.
  • Stakeholders who are either engaged in redevelopment at former petroleum release sites or folks who are involved in community engagement and revitalization activities.
As a participant in this training you should learn to:
  • Recognize the ITRC document as a go-to resource for evaluating TPH risk at petroleum-contaminated sites
  • Recognize how TPH -impacted media interacts with the environment and changes over time
  • Select appropriate analytic method(s) to match site objectives
  • Apply the decision framework to determine when a site-specific target level may be more appropriate than a generic screening level for TPH
Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, TPH Risk Evaluation at Petroleum-Contaminated Sites (TPHRisk-1, 2018) prior to attending the class.

Vapor Intrusion Mitigation (VIM-1) - A Two Part Series

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council The Vapor Intrusion Mitigation training is a series of eight (8) modules, presented over two sessions.

The Vapor Intrusion Mitigation training series provides an overview of vapor intrusion mitigation and presenting information from the ITRC fact sheets, technology information sheets, and checklists (VIM-1, 2021):

Session 1:
  • Introduction & Overview of Vapor Intrusion Mitigation Training Team
  • Conceptual Site Models for Vapor Intrusion Mitigation
  • Public Outreach During Vapor Intrusion Mitigation
  • Rapid Response & Ventilation for Vapor Intrusion Mitigation
  • Remediation & Institutional Controls

Session 2:
  • Active Mitigation Approaches
  • Passive Mitigation Approaches
  • System Verification, OM&M, and Exit Strategies


When certain contaminants or hazardous substances are released into the soil or groundwater, they may volatilize into soil gas. Vapor intrusion (VI) occurs when these vapors migrate up into overlying buildings and contaminate indoor air. ITRC has previously released guidance documents focused on VI, including the "Vapor Intrusion Pathway: A Practical Guidance" (VI-1, 2007) and "Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management" (PVI, 2014). However, ITRC has received multiple requests for additional details and training on mitigation strategies for addressing this exposure pathway.

The ITRC Vapor Intrusion Mitigation Team (VIMT) created ten fact sheets, 16 technology information sheets, and 4 checklists with the goal of assisting regulators during review of vapor intrusion mitigation systems, and helping contractors understand the essential elements of planning, design, implementation, and operation, maintenance and monitoring (OM&M) of mitigation systems.

After the Vapor Intrusion Mitigation series, you should understand:
  • How to locate and utilize the VIM-1 fact sheets, technology information sheets, and checklists
  • The importance of a VI mitigation conceptual site model
  • How public outreach for VI mitigation differs from other environmental matters
  • When to implement rapid response for vapor intrusion and applicable methodologies
  • The differences between remediation, mitigation, and institutional controls
  • Available technologies for active and passive mitigation, and design considerations for various approaches
  • How/when/why different mitigation technologies are appropriate
  • How to verify mitigation system success, address underperformance, and develop a plan for discontinuing a mitigation system

We encourage you to use the ITRC Vapor Intrusion Mitigation work products (VIM-1) and these training modules to learn about vapor intrusion mitigation and how you can apply these best practices to improve decision-making at your sites. For regulators and other government agency staff, this understanding of vapor intrusion mitigation can be incorporated into your own programs.

While the training makes every effort to keep the information accessible to a wide audience, it is assumed that the participants will have some basic technical understanding of chemistry, environmental sciences, and risk assessment. As with other emerging contaminants, our understanding of vapor intrusion mitigation continues to advance. This training provides the participants with information on areas where the science is evolving and where uncertainty persists.