U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

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CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatSuperfund Research Program Progress...

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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatVapor Intrusion (VI) Investigation ...

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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatNARPM Presents...Utilizations of th...

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Superfund Task Force - Adaptive Management Pilot Criteria Document Review for Stakeholders

A memorandum entitled "Superfund Task Force Recommendation #3: Broaden the Use of Adaptive Management" was completed by EPA on July 3rd, 2018 which provided Superfund's working definition of Adaptive Management and outlined an implementation plan to expand Adaptive Management’s use at Superfund sites. Per the implementation plan, EPA is in the process of seeking input on the pilot criteria with separate input from EPA, States/Tribes, and other stakeholders. This webinar is to provide stakeholders an overview of the Task Force Adaptive Management Implementation Plan and pilot criteria to support their review of the pilot criteria out for comment.

Borehole Geophysics Applied to Bedrock Hydrogeologic Evaluations

This presentation introduces the viewer to borehole geophysical tools commonly used in hydrogeologic investigations. These tools include gamma, temperature, conductivity, caliper, borehole video, acoustic and optical televiewers, heat-pulse flowmeter, and borehole deviation.. Examples and case studies follow illustrating the usefulness of data obtained through the utilization of these tools, especially when used to design packer tests and multi-level discrete-zone sampling strings. In addition, borehole tools commonly used in shallow oil/gas well abandonment are presented.

Chlorinated Solvent Bioremediation: Fundamentals and Practical Application for Remedial Project Managers

This webinar is a result of Recommendation 9 of EPA's Superfund Task Force, which encourages the Superfund program to "utilize state-of-the-art technologies to expedite cleanup." Actions under this recommendation include expanding the use of new remediation technologies and approaches to address contaminated sites.
https://www.epa.gov/superfund/superfund-task-force-public-participation-opportunities#webinar

Anaerobic reductive dechlorination (ARD) can be used to cost-effectively remediate chlorinated solvent sites. In ARD, microbial communities use substrates to sequentially degrade chlorinated solvents such as trichlorethylene (TCE). Depending on conditions at a site, remediation may involve adding substrates (biostimulation) and/or dechlorinating organisms (bioaugmentation). This presentation will discuss the biological and chemical principles of this technology and is geared toward remedial project managers. Key considerations for site specific application will be covered. In addition, case studies will provide examples of data from sites displaying ARD as well as sites with poor performance or insufficient data.

NARPM Presents...Stress and Environmental Contamination: Tips and Tools from ATSDR

Environmental contamination can disrupt life as usual. Community members may feel stress for several reasons, including health and financial concerns. Join this webinar to learn more about stress, how it can affect health, and why environmental contamination can cause it. We’ll offer practical tips and tools for acknowledging stress with community members and helping them cope. The webinar will wrap up with suggestions for dealing with stress you may feel as a professional working with communities affected by environmental contamination.

Attendees may be interested in Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) stress-focused fact sheets and materials. Please see:

NARPM Presents…Tools for Estimating Groundwater Contaminant Flux to Surface Water

Surface water bodies adjacent to sites with contaminated groundwater may receive impacts that impair otherwise functional ecosystems and create new exposure pathways, increasing human health risks. Optimizing site characterization protocols to improve the remedy design effort is best achieved by developing knowledge of the potential extent and magnitude of contaminated groundwater discharge into the surface water body. Through field-based research, EPA’s Office of Research and Development has developed several approaches to more reliably characterize system hydrology and assess contaminant flux. A series of standard methods and spreadsheet-based calculation tools have been developed to facilitate data collection and analysis, and all in an affordable and consistent manner. A case study example will be used to highlight these novel approaches to improve understanding of the spatial and temporal dynamics of contaminant transport across the groundwater-surface water transition zone.

NARPM Presents...Utilizations of the U.S. EPA - Environmental Response Team's Mobile Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer Laboratories to Address Environment Issues

The U.S. EPA Environmental Response Team's (ERT) Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) mobile laboratories have been utilized for numerous and varied monitoring and analysis operations. Over the years, the TAGA laboratories have been employed at traditional emergency responses, including chemical plant explosions, train derailments, pipeline breaks, oil spills, floods, hurricanes, etc., as well as terrorist events involving the World Trade Center attack and the weaponized anthrax assaults of the United States Hart Senate Office Building, United State Post Offices, and the American Media Incorporated Building. Additionally, the TAGA laboratories have been used to perform ambient air monitoring in highly industrial areas of Texas and Louisiana as part of the US EPA's Urban Air Toxic Program. Moreover, the TAGA labs have been implemented to investigate vapor intrusion at over 100 Superfund sites across the country involving hundreds of buildings using the instrumentation to provide analytical results for soil gas, sub-slab vapor, indoor air, and ambient air matrices. Furthermore, the laboratories have been involved in research and development operations for chemical warfare agents' detection and remediation effectiveness of materials, as well as, fumigant detection and containment during building remediation of biological agents.

The TAGA mobile laboratories are currently comprised of analytical instrumentation, which includes but is not limited to a PE Sciex 365 triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS/MS) with a low pressure chemical ionization (LPCI) source and an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source, an Agilent Gas Chromatograph (GC) 7890 and Mass Spectrometer (MS) 5975C with a loop injection system, and an Agilent MicroGC. Additionally, the TAGA laboratories are equipped with a global positioning system (GPS) and a geographic information system (GIS). The stated equipment was incorporated to perform the above analytical services.

Superfund Research Program Progress in Research Webinar Part 1: Duke University and University of Arizona

This Superfund Research Program (SRP) Progress in Research webinar series highlights promising research from SRP Centers awarded grants in 2017. In this session, awardees from Duke University and University of Arizona will describe their research projects, accomplishments, and next steps.

The Duke University SRP Center focuses on early, low-dose exposures to toxicants and developmental impacts, which are usually evident only later in life. They conduct research to characterize these outcomes following exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organophosphate pesticides and flame retardants, halogenated phenolic compounds, and some metals. They are also investigating mechanisms and approaches to remove these chemicals from the environment.

The University of Arizona SRP Center is addressing the risk and remediation of metal mining wastes in arid and semi-arid environments, focusing on Arizona mines as examples that can apply to other hard-rock mines around the world. Center scientists focus on finding innovative and cost-effective methods for remediating airborne and waterborne mine waste and on evaluating the effect of dusts that contain arsenic on lung development and health.

Superfund Research Program Progress in Research Webinar Part 2: University of Louisville, University of New Mexico, and University of Washington

This Superfund Research Program (SRP) Progress in Research webinar series highlights promising research from SRP Centers awarded grants in 2017. In this session, awardees from University of Louisville, University of New Mexico, and University of Washington will describe their research projects, accomplishments, and next steps.

The University of Louisville SRP Center studies the cardiometabolic effects of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) that are of high relevance to human health. Center researchers are conducting studies to unravel critical pathways of toxicity of VOCs found at Superfund and related sites. Center researchers are also creating new technologies to detect VOCs at low levels in air to enable future exposure assessment activities.

The University of New Mexico Metal Exposure and Toxicity Assessment on Tribal Lands in the Southwest SRP Center (UNM METALS) focuses on risk reduction for Native Americans exposed to hazardous metals mixtures from abandoned uranium mine waste. UNM METALS emphasizes site-specific physical, mineralogic, and biogeochemical properties of the waste that alter immune function and DNA repair in tribal populations. They are also developing and testing novel cost-effective metals immobilization and removal strategies to reduce exposure risks in ways compatible with tribal culture.

The University of Washington SRP Center is investigating the mechanisms and ramifications of metal neurotoxicity in humans and aquatic species. They are developing biological markers predictive of exposure, neurotoxic injury, and genetic determinants that underlie susceptibility to cadmium and manganese. They are also exploring the biogeochemical factors that govern the fate of metals, such as arsenic, in the environment.

Superfund Research Program Progress in Research Webinar Part 3: Columbia University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and University of Rhode Island

This Superfund Research Program (SRP) Progress in Research webinar series highlights promising research from SRP Centers awarded grants in 2017. In this session, awardees from Columbia University,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and University of Rhode Island will describe their research projects, accomplishments, and next steps.

The Columbia University SRP Center conducts research that aims to understand and reduce arsenic exposure and toxicity in humans exposed to arsenic in the U.S. and Bangladesh. The projects focus on exposure to arsenic, including from private well water, potential health effects of exposure, and ways to optimize and implement remediation methods to remove arsenic from groundwater.

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology SRP Center brings engineering and scientific innovation to bear on issues related to hazardous substances that are relevant to people in Maine and Massachusetts. Their research focuses on two pervasive contaminants, N-nitrosamines and polycyclic
aromatic hydrocarbons, and centers around development and application of novel technologies to detect and map contaminants, and to reveal their biological effects.

The University of Rhode Island Sources, Transport, Exposure and Effects of PFASs (STEEP) SRP Center is addressing the emerging and expanding problem of poly- and perfluorinated alkyl substances (PFASs) contamination. STEEP aims to better understand the pathways of PFAS contamination in groundwater, and the effects and exposure pathways to vulnerable human populations and rodent models during early development. They are also supporting the development and deployment of passive sampling techniques for PFAS and their precursors in water and air.

Superfund Research Program Progress in Research Webinar Part 4: Boston University, Texas A&M University, and University of California, Davis

This Superfund Research Program (SRP) Progress in Research webinar series highlights promising research from SRP Centers awarded grants in 2017. In this session, awardees Boston University, Texas A&M University, and University of California, Davis, will describe their research projects, accomplishments, and next steps.

The Boston University SRP Center explores the long-term impacts of early life exposure to Superfund chemicals in humans and wildlife. Their work focuses on contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyls and tetrachloroethylene found in and around the New Bedford Harbor Superfund site and in drinking water of nearby communities.

The Texas A&M University SRP Center focuses on developing comprehensive tools and models for addressing exposure to mixtures during emergency-related environmental contamination events. The researchers are evaluating the complexities of hazardous chemical exposures, potential adverse health impacts, and potential hazards of exposures to complex mixtures through projects that derive from a case study utilizing the Texas Galveston Bay area.

The University of California, Davis SRP Center uses integrated chromatographic, biosensor, and cell-based technologies to detect and identify contaminants and develop innovative approaches for bioremediation. The Center is expanding the use of transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and integrated bioinformatics technologies to discover new mechanisms of action of hazardous materials and biological markers for their action and to connect hazardous substance exposures to organism level effects.

Vapor Intrusion (VI) Investigation using the Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) Mobile Laboratories

Vapor intrusion has been a topic of intense interest in the United States for the recent past. The concern that the vapor intrusion pathway poses is whether an unacceptable risk exists for the occupants. To determine the risk associated with the vapor intrusion pathway, confounding factors due to the presence of these chemical from other sources need to be qualitatively and quantitatively identified so that the contributions from the vapor intrusion alone can be assessed. Because risk is compound specific and many compounds have unacceptable chronic risk levels at extremely low concentrations, an analytical technique is needed that has high selectivity and sensitivity, as well as, continuous real-time analytical updates to accurately and economically assess vapor intrusion sites. This presentation addresses a technology and practice that meets these requirements.

This webinar is a result of Recommendation 9 of EPA's Superfund Task Force, which encourages the Superfund program to "utilize state-of-the-art technologies to expedite cleanup." Actions under this recommendation include expanding the use of new remediation technologies and approaches to address contaminated sites.
https://www.epa.gov/superfund/superfund-task-force-public-participation-opportunities#webinar
Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


Geophysical Classification for Munitions Response

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council For decades, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) has produced and used military munitions for live-fire testing and training to prepare the U.S. military for combat operations. As a result, unexploded ordnance (UXO) and discarded military munitions may be present at over 5,200 former ranges and former munitions operating facilities throughout the United States. With the traditional technique to identify munitions for removal at these sites, DOD and its contractors have used various types of detection instruments to simply detect buried metal objects then excavation and examination of most of the detected items, to determine whether or not they are military munitions. Even highly trained UXO-qualified personnel typically excavate hundreds of metal items for each one munition recovered. Nearly half of these sites require a munitions response, at an estimated cost to complete of $14 billion and with a completion date of 2100. To improve the efficiency of munitions response, DOD’s Environmental Security Technology Certification Program and its research partners in academia and industry have developed a new approach: geophysical classification. Geophysical classification is the process of using advanced data to make principled decisions as to whether buried metal objects are potentially hazardous munitions (that is targets of interest) that should be excavated, or items such as metal clutter and debris (non-targets of interest) that can be left in the ground.

ITRC’s Geophysical Classification for Munitions Response (GCMR-2, 2015) and training class explain the process of geophysical classification, describe its benefits and limitations, and discuss the information and data needed by regulators to monitor and evaluate the use of the technology. This document and training also emphasize using a systematic planning process to develop data acquisition and decision strategies at the outset of a munitions response effort, as well as quality considerations throughout the project. Stakeholder issues that are unique to munitions response are also discussed. After this training class, participants will:
  • Understand the technology and terminology
  • Be ready to engage in the planning process to address quality considerations throughout a project
  • Find tools to transfer knowledge within organizations and to stakeholders
  • Start to transition mindset to decisions that leave non-hazardous items in the ground
An audience who understand current munitions response tools and procedures (for example, geophysical surveys, sensors, data analysis) will benefit most from this document and training. For federal and state environmental regulators, scientists, and engineers, as well as contractors, munitions response managers, technical staff, geophysicists, and stakeholders, this document explains how geophysical classification can be used in munitions response. Stakeholders with an interest in a particular munitions response site (MRS) at which classification has been or may be proposed will also benefit from this document and training.

For use during this training class, we created a reference with the Terminology and Acronyms used in ITRC “Geophysical Classification for Munitions Response” Training.

Geospatial Analysis for Optimization at Environmental Sites

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Optimization activities can improve performance, increase monitoring efficiency, and support contaminated site decisions. Project managers can use geospatial analysis for evaluation of optimization opportunities. Unlike traditional statistical analysis, geospatial methods incorporate the spatial and temporal dependence between nearby data points, which is an important feature of almost all data collected as part of an environmental investigation. The results of geospatial analyses add additional lines of evidence to decision making in optimization opportunities in environmental sites across all project life cycle stages (release detection, site characterization, remediation, monitoring and closure) in soil, groundwater or sediment remediation projects for different sizes and types of sites.

The purpose of ITRC's Geospatial Analysis for Optimization at Environmental Sites (GRO-1) guidance document and this associated training is to explain, educate, and train state regulators and other practitioners in understanding and using geospatial analyses to evaluate optimization opportunities at environmental sites. With the ITRC GRO-1 web-based guidance document and this associated training class, project managers will be able to:
  • Evaluate available data and site needs to determine if geospatial analyses are appropriate for a given site
  • For a project and specific lifecycle stage, identify optimization questions where geospatial methods can contribute to better decision making
  • For a project and optimization question(s), select appropriate geospatial method(s) and software using the geospatial analysis work flow, tables and flow charts in the guidance document
  • With geospatial analyses results (note: some geospatial analyses may be performed by the project manager, but many geospatial analyses will be performed by technical experts), explain what the results mean and appropriately apply in decision making
  • Use the project manager’s tool box, interactive flow charts for choosing geospatial methods and review checklist to use geospatial analyses confidently in decision making

Groundwater Statistics for Environmental Project Managers

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Statistical techniques may be used throughout the process of cleaning up contaminated groundwater. It is challenging for practitioners, who are not experts in statistics, to interpret, and use statistical techniques. ITRC developed the Technical and Regulatory Web-based Guidance on Groundwater Statistics and Monitoring Compliance (GSMC-1, 2013, http://www.itrcweb.org/gsmc-1/) and this associated training specifically for environmental project managers who review or use statistical calculations for reports, who make recommendations or decisions based on statistics, or who need to demonstrate compliance for groundwater projects. The training class will encourage and support project managers and others who are not statisticians to:

ITRC's Technical and Regulatory Web-based Guidance on Groundwater Statistics and Monitoring Compliance (GSMC-1, 2013) and this associated training bring clarity to the planning, implementation, and communication of groundwater statistical methods and should lead to greater confidence and transparency in the use of groundwater statistics for site management.

Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Chemical contaminants in soil and groundwater can volatilize into soil gas and migrate through unsaturated soils of the vadose zone. Vapor intrusion (VI) occurs when these vapors migrate upward into overlying buildings through cracks and gaps in the building floors, foundations, and utility conduits, and contaminate indoor air. If present at sufficiently high concentrations, these vapors may present a threat to the health and safety of building occupants. Petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) is a subset of VI and is the process by which volatile petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) released as vapors from light nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPL), petroleum-contaminated soils, or petroleum-contaminated groundwater migrate through the vadose zone and into overlying buildings. Fortunately, in the case of PHC vapors, this migration is often limited by microorganisms that are normally present in soil. The organisms consume these chemicals, reducing them to nontoxic end products through the process of biodegradation. The extent and rate to which this natural biodegradation process occurs is strongly influenced by the concentration of the vapor source, the distance the vapors must travel through soil from the source to potential receptors, and the presence of oxygen (O2) in the subsurface environment between the source and potential receptors.

The ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance Web-Based Document, Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management (PVI-1, 2014) and this associated Internet-based training provides regulators and practitioners with consensus information based on empirical data and recent research to support PVI decision making under different regulatory frameworks. The PVI assessment strategy described in this guidance document enables confident decision making that protects human health for various types of petroleum sites and multiple PHC compounds. This guidance provides a comprehensive methodology for screening, investigating, and managing potential PVI sites and is intended to promote the efficient use of resources and increase confidence in decision making when evaluating the potential for vapor intrusion at petroleum-contaminated sites. By using the ITRC guidance document, the vapor intrusion pathway can be eliminated from further investigation at many sites where soil or groundwater is contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons or where LNAPL is present.

After attending this ITRC Internet-based training, participants should be able to:
  • Determine when and how to use the ITRC PVI document at their sites
  • Describe the important role of biodegradation impacts on the PVI pathway (in contrast to chlorinated solvent contaminated sites)
  • Value a PVI conceptual site model (CSM) and list its key components
  • Apply the ITRC PVI 8 step decision process to screen sites for the PVI pathway and determine actions to take if a site does not initially screen out, (e.g., site investigation, modeling, and vapor control and site management)
  • Access fact sheets to support community engagement activities at each step in the process
For reference during the training class, participants should have a copy of the flowcharts, Figures 1-2, 3-2, and 4-1 from the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance Web-Based Document, Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management (PVI-1, 2014) and are available as a 3-page PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/PVI/ITRC-PVI-FlowCharts.pdf


ITRC also offers a 2-day PVI focused classroom training at locations across the US. The classroom training provides participants the opportunity to learn more in-depth information about the PVI pathway and practice applying the ITRC PVI guidance document with a diverse group of environmental professionals. Learn more at the ITRC PVI classroom training page.