U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

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CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
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Military Munitions Support Services - MR-QAPP Module 1 RI/FS: How to Document Your Investigation and an Overview of Data Usability Assessment

The Intergovernmental Data Quality Task Force (IDQTF) has developed the Munitions Response Quality Assurance Project Plan (MR-QAPP) Toolkit to assist project teams in planning for the characterization and remediation of buried munitions and explosives of concern (MEC) at Department of Defense (DoD) installations and formerly used defense sites (FUDS). MR-QAPP Module 1 illustrates approaches for planning and implementing the Remedial Investigation (RI)/Feasibility Study (FS) phase of investigation. This webinar will provide an review of the document and provides overview of the data usability assessment for an example site.
Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Characterization and remediation of contaminated groundwater in fractured rock has not been conducted or studied as broadly as groundwater at unconsolidated porous media sites. This unfamiliarity and lack of experience can make fractured rock sites perplexing. This situation is especially true in portions of the U.S. where bedrock aquifers are a primary source of drinking and process water, and demands on water are increasing. As a result, remedial activities often default to containment of contaminant plumes, point of use treatment and long-term monitoring rather than active reduction of risk. However, this attitude does not incorporate recent advances in the science and technology of fractured rock site characterization and remediation.
The basis for this training course is the ITRC guidance: Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock. The purpose of this guidance is to dispel the belief that fractured rock sites are too complex to characterize and remediate. The physical, chemical and contaminant transport concepts in fractured rock have similarities to unconsolidated porous media, yet there are important differences. These differences are the focus of this guidance.

By participating in this training class, you should learn to:
  • Use ITRCís Fractured Rock Document to guide your decision making so you can:
  • Develop quality Conceptual Site Models (CSMs) for fractured rock sites
  • Set realistic remedial objectives
  • Select the best remedial options
  • Monitor remedial progress and assess results
  • Value an interdisciplinary site team approach to bring collective expertise to improve decision making and to have confidence when going beyond containment and monitoring - - to actually remediating fractured rock sites.
Case studies of successful fractured rock remediation are presented to provide examples of how fractured rock sites can be evaluated and available tools applied to characterization and remediation.
Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock prior to attending the class.

Geospatial Analysis for Optimization at Environmental Sites

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Optimization activities can improve performance, increase monitoring efficiency, and support contaminated site decisions. Project managers can use geospatial analysis for evaluation of optimization opportunities. Unlike traditional statistical analysis, geospatial methods incorporate the spatial and temporal dependence between nearby data points, which is an important feature of almost all data collected as part of an environmental investigation. The results of geospatial analyses add additional lines of evidence to decision making in optimization opportunities in environmental sites across all project life cycle stages (release detection, site characterization, remediation, monitoring and closure) in soil, groundwater or sediment remediation projects for different sizes and types of sites.

The purpose of ITRC's Geospatial Analysis for Optimization at Environmental Sites (GRO-1) guidance document and this associated training is to explain, educate, and train state regulators and other practitioners in understanding and using geospatial analyses to evaluate optimization opportunities at environmental sites. With the ITRC GRO-1 web-based guidance document and this associated training class, project managers will be able to:
  • Evaluate available data and site needs to determine if geospatial analyses are appropriate for a given site
  • For a project and specific lifecycle stage, identify optimization questions where geospatial methods can contribute to better decision making
  • For a project and optimization question(s), select appropriate geospatial method(s) and software using the geospatial analysis work flow, tables and flow charts in the guidance document
  • With geospatial analyses results (note: some geospatial analyses may be performed by the project manager, but many geospatial analyses will be performed by technical experts), explain what the results mean and appropriately apply in decision making
  • Use the project managerís tool box, interactive flow charts for choosing geospatial methods and review checklist to use geospatial analyses confidently in decision making

Connecting the Science to Managing LNAPL Sites a 3 Part Series

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Connecting the Science to Managing LNAPL Sites Ė 3-Part Series

The newly updated LNAPLs (Light Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids) 3-part training course series is based on the ITRC guidance: LNAPL Site Management: LCSM Evolution, Decision Process, and Remedial Technologies (LNAPL-3, 2018) and focuses on connecting the science to managing LNAPL sites and helping you:
  • Build upon your Understanding of LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface (Part 1)
  • Develop your LNAPL Conceptual Site Model and LNAPL Remedial Goals (Part 2)
  • Select/Implement LNAPL Technologies (Part 3)
After this training series, the expectation is that you will have the skills and understanding to use ITRC science-based resources to improve decision making at your LNAPL sites. For regulators and other government agency staff, this improved understanding can hopefully be incorporated into your own LNAPL programs.

It is recommended that participants have a general understanding of hydrogeology and some familiarity with petroleum contaminated sites. The courses will build on your existing LNAPL knowledge and outline the framework for making LNAPL remediation and management decisions. It is expected that participants will attend this 3-part training series in sequence.

LNAPL Training Part 1: Understanding LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface
Part 1 teaches how LNAPLs behave in the subsurface and examines what controls their behavior. Part 1:
  • Explains what LNAPL data can tell you about the LNAPL and site conditions
  • Covers how that information is applied to the development of an LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM) (Part 2) and LNAPL technology selection (Part 3)
Relevant and practical examples are used to illustrate key concepts.

LNAPL Training Part 2: LNAPL Conceptual Site Models and the LNAPL Decision Process
Part 2 teaches participants how to develop an LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM) and the overall framework for making LNAPL remediation and management decisions. Part 2:
  • Discusses key LNAPL and site data
  • Explains when and why those data may be important
  • Covers how to effectively organize the data into an LCSM
Part 2 also discusses how to address LNAPL concerns by selecting appropriate goals and objectives, choosing applicable technologies, and assigning remedial performance metrics and endpoints.

LNAPL Training Part 3: Using LNAPL Science, the LCSM, and LNAPL Goals to Select an LNAPL Remedial Technology
Part 3 of the training teaches the importance of informed remedial technology selection and appropriate technology application. Part 3:
  • Discusses remedial technology groups
  • Introduces specific and new remedial technologies
  • Reviews the technology selection process, how technologies can be combined to accelerate cleanup, and how the LCSM informs selection
A case study and examples demonstrate the use of these tools for remedial technology selection, implementation, and demonstration of successful remediation.
Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, LNAPL Site Management: LCSM Evolution, Decision Process, and Remedial Technologies (LNAPL-3, 2018), prior to attending the class.