U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

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CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatITRC TPH Risk Evaluation at Petrole...

TPH Risk Evaluation at Petroleum-Contaminated Sites
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatFRTR Presents...Per- and Polyfluoro...

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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatSuperfund Redevelopment Initiative ...

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CERCLA 108(b) Financial Responsibility Requirements Proposal for the Electric Power Generation, Transmission, and Distribution Industry

In a Federal Register notice on January 11, 2017, the Agency made a determination to proceed with rulemakings that will either develop proposed financial responsibility requirements under CERCLA 108(b), or determine such requirements are not warranted. The first of the three industries for which EPA is proposing rulemaking is the Electric Power Generation, Transmission, and Distribution Industry. This webinar will provide an overview of the rulemaking development process and provide an opportunity for the public to provide comment.

FRTR Presents...Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) Emerging Characterization and Remedial Technologies, Session 1

This is part of a webinar series featuring presentations delivered at the Fall 2018 FRTR Meeting and related material. The meeting's objective was to identify and discuss the emerging science behind PFAS characterization and remedial technologies. This session will include the following topics:
  • What are PFAS, and What are the Issues with Them?
  • Treatment Technologies for PFAS Site Management

NARPM Presents...Stand and Deliver Effective Presentations

This webinar will provide participants with guidelines on how to make better presentations to the public, their peers, or management. The webinar will help to improve your presentation skills and provide you with tools and techniques to be an interesting and effective presenter.

What is in it for you:

  • More polished platform skills.
  • Improved ability to manage content.
  • Greater skill using a variety of training methods.
  • Enhanced ability to create and use visual aids.
  • Ability to manage your audience.

The webinar is intended to help participants increase their comfort in public speaking, control and connect with their audience, handle audience participation, and ultimately deliver the message and take-away points of training courses they are planning to instruct. The webinar will teach participants how to manage nerves, voice, gestures, transitions, visual aids, and content. The webinar also addresses how to manage the audience to include difficult participants, the solicitation of questions, and the response to questions and will include techniques for adapting to diverse audiences.

The webinar is open to all interested, but strongly recommended for those EPA staff scheduled to instruct at the 2019 NARPM Training Program and 2020 OSC Academy Training Program.

Superfund Redevelopment Initiative Series: Bona Fide Prospective Purchasers: Liability Protection and Redevelopment

Location, location, location...and liability protection! EPA works with bona fide prospective purchasers to help them understand liability protections and any site use restrictions in order to safely redevelop Superfund sites during and after cleanup. This webinar will provide an overview of liability protections, best practices and specific examples of bona fide prospective purchasers working with EPA to successfully redevelop Superfund sites.
Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Characterization and remediation of contaminated groundwater in fractured rock has not been conducted or studied as broadly as groundwater at unconsolidated porous media sites. This unfamiliarity and lack of experience can make fractured rock sites perplexing. This situation is especially true in portions of the U.S. where bedrock aquifers are a primary source of drinking and process water, and demands on water are increasing. As a result, remedial activities often default to containment of contaminant plumes, point of use treatment and long-term monitoring rather than active reduction of risk. However, this attitude does not incorporate recent advances in the science and technology of fractured rock site characterization and remediation.
The basis for this training course is the ITRC guidance: Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock. The purpose of this guidance is to dispel the belief that fractured rock sites are too complex to characterize and remediate. The physical, chemical and contaminant transport concepts in fractured rock have similarities to unconsolidated porous media, yet there are important differences. These differences are the focus of this guidance.

By participating in this training class, you should learn to:
  • Use ITRC?s Fractured Rock Document to guide your decision making so you can:
  • Develop quality Conceptual Site Models (CSMs) for fractured rock sites
  • Set realistic remedial objectives
  • Select the best remedial options
  • Monitor remedial progress and assess results
  • Value an interdisciplinary site team approach to bring collective expertise to improve decision making and to have confidence when going beyond containment and monitoring - - to actually remediating fractured rock sites.
Case studies of successful fractured rock remediation are presented to provide examples of how fractured rock sites can be evaluated and available tools applied to characterization and remediation.
Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock prior to attending the class.

Long-term Contaminant Management Using Institutional Controls

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Institutional controls (ICs) are administrative or legal restrictions that provide protection from exposure to contaminants on a site. When ICs are jeopardized or fail, direct exposure to human health and the environment can occur. While a variety of guidance and research to date has focused on the implementation of ICs, ITRC's Long-term Contaminant Management Using Institutional Controls (IC-1, 2016) guidance and this associated training class focuses on post-implementation IC management, including monitoring, evaluation, stakeholder communications, enforcement, and termination. The ITRC guidance and training will assist those who are responsible for the management and stewardship of Ics. ITRC has developed a downloadable tool that steps users through the process of planning and designing IC management needs. This tool can help to create a long lasting record of the site that includes the regulatory authority, details of the IC, the responsibilities of all parties, a schedule for monitoring the performance of the IC, and more. The tool generates an editable Long Term Stewardship (LTS) plan in Microsoft Word.

After attending the training, participants will be able to:
  • Describe best practices and evolving trends for IC management at individual sites and across state agency programs
  • Use this guidance to
    • Improve IC reliability and prevent IC failures
    • Improve existing, or develop new, IC Management programs
    • Identify the pros and cons about differing IC management approaches
  • Use the tools to establish an LTS plan for specific sites
  • Use the elements in the tools to understand the information that should populate an IC registry or data management system.

The target audience for this guidance includes environmental regulators at all levels of government, private and public responsible or obligated parties (Ops), current site owners and operators, environmental consultants, and prospective purchasers of property and their agents. Other stakeholders who have an interest in a property can also use this guidance to help understand how to manage Ics.

Remediation Management of Complex Sites

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council At some sites, complex site-specific conditions make it difficult to fully remediate environmental contamination. Both technical and nontechnical challenges can impede remediation and may prevent a site from achieving federal- and state-mandated regulatory cleanup goals within a reasonable time frame. For example, technical challenges may include geologic, hydrogeologic, geochemical, and contaminant-related conditions as well as large-scale or surface conditions. In addition, nontechnical challenges may also play a role such as managing changes that occur over long time frames, overlapping regulatory and financial responsibilities between agencies, setting achievable site objectives, maintaining effective institutional controls, redevelopment and changes in land use, and funding considerations.
This training course and associated ITRC guidance: Remediation Management of Complex Sites (RMCS-1, 2017), provide a recommended holistic process for management of challenging sites, termed "adaptive site management." This process is a comprehensive, flexible, and iterative process that is well-suited for sites where there is significant uncertainty in remedy performance predictions. Adaptive site management includes the establishment of interim objectives and long-term site objectives that consider both technical and nontechnical challenges. Periodic adjustment of the remedial approach may involve multiple technologies at any one time and changes in technologies over time. Comprehensive planning and scheduled evaluations of remedy performance help decision makers track remedy progress and improve the timeliness of remedy optimization, reevaluations, or transition to other technologies/contingency actions.
By participating in this training course we expect you will learn to apply the ITRC guidance document to:
  • Identify and integrate technical and nontechnical challenges into a holistic approach to remediation
  • Use the Remediation Potential Assessment to identify whether adaptive site management is warranted due to site complexity
  • Understand and apply adaptive site management principles
  • Develop a long-term performance-based action plan
  • Apply well-demonstrated techniques for effective stakeholder engagement
  • Access additional resources, tools, and case studies most relevant for complex sites
  • Communicate the value of the guidance to regulators, practitioners, community members, and others
Ultimately, using the guidance that can lead to better decision making and remediation management at complex sites. The guidance is intended to benefit a variety of site decision makers, including regulators, responsible parties and their consultants, and public and tribal stakeholders.
Case studies are used to describe real-world applications of remediation and remediation management at complex sites. Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance Remediation Management of Complex Sites (RMCS-1, 2017) prior to attending the class.

TPH Risk Evaluation at Petroleum-Contaminated Sites

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Remediation at petroleum release sites is often infeasible for technical or cost reasons. Many of these sites could be depleted in typical indicator compounds, such as BTEXN, but still heavily contaminated in terms of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH). The traditional indicator compound approach for managing petroleum contaminants may not fully identify short- and long-term potential environmental concerns, can create delays in project schedules and cost overages for sub-surface utility work or redevelopment. It is important to consider a comprehensive cumulative risk-based approach to more effectively incorporate TPH data in addition to traditional BTEXN data for cleanup and long-term management decisions.

The basis for this training course is the ITRC guidance: TPH Risk Evaluation at Petroleum-Contaminated Sites (TPHRisk-1, 2018). The guidance builds on long-standing and current research and experience, and presents the current science for evaluating TPH risk at petroleum-contaminated sites. The methods and procedures to evaluate human and ecological risk and establish cleanup requirements in the various media at petroleum release sites will assist decision makers in developing and implementing a technically defensible approach. In addition, the guidance provides information and supplemental references to assist practitioners and project managers in the assessment of fate, transport, exposure, and toxicity of TPH. The guidance users will also gain information that may be used in conjunction with classic tiered approaches for risk-based decision making (ASTM 2015b, ITRC Risk 3 2015), including modifications in the assessment and remedial-decision and regulatory framework for TPH impacts through direct comparison to screening levels, site-specific modification of screening levels, and complete site-specific risk assessment for sources, receptors, and pathways, where appropriate.

The target audience for this guidance and training course is:
  • Regulators and Program Managers interested in knowing how site management decisions can influence the TPH risk evaluation process.
  • Risk assessors new to TPH data or those who want additional knowledge and training in the current methods and common practices for collecting and using TPH data in assessments to more accurately determine human health and/or ecological risks at petroleum-contaminated sites.
  • Stakeholders who are either engaged in redevelopment at former petroleum release sites or folks who are involved in community engagement and revitalization activities.
As a participant in this training you should learn to:
  • Recognize the ITRC document as a go-to resource for evaluating TPH risk at petroleum-contaminated sites
  • Recognize how TPH -impacted media interacts with the environment and changes over time
  • Select appropriate analytic method(s) to match site objectives
  • Apply the decision framework to determine when a site-specific target level may be more appropriate than a generic screening level for TPH
Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, TPH Risk Evaluation at Petroleum-Contaminated Sites (TPHRisk-1, 2018) prior to attending the class.