U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


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U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

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CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatHarnessing Natural River Processes ...

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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatFRTR Presents...Per- and Polyfluoro...

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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatSuperfund Redevelopment Initiative ...

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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatBioremediation - Expanding the Tool...

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Contaminated Sediments Virtual Workshop Session 1 - Site Characterization

The US EPA Office of Research and Development / Office of Science Policy (ORD/OSP) in cooperation with the Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) is sponsoring a 4-part virtual workshop series to address current challenges at contaminated sediment sites. The aim of the virtual workshop is to provide interactive discussions between subject matter expert panelists and workshop participants. Consequently, each virtual session will feature brief topic introductions by panelists followed by facilitated panelist/participant discussions which will include opportunities for questions and answers, brainstorming, identification of concerns and research needs, and quick spot surveys. If you have a contaminated sediment site, this is the virtual workshop for you!

Proper characterization of a contaminated sediment site is crucial to the success of future actions taken at the site. The first session will address the following topics:
  • Selection of appropriate models and estimated model level of effort,
  • Use of the incremental sampling (IS) method at sediment sites, and
  • Passive sampling of pore water and a discussion of its limitations.

Contaminated Sediments Virtual Workshop Session 2 - Risk Assessment

The US EPA Office of Research and Development / Office of Science Policy (ORD/OSP) in cooperation with the Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) is sponsoring a 4-part virtual workshop series to address current challenges at contaminated sediment sites. The aim of the virtual workshop is to provide interactive discussions between subject matter expert panelists and workshop participants. Consequently, each virtual session will feature brief topic introductions by panelists followed by facilitated panelist/participant discussions which will include opportunities for questions and answers, brainstorming, identification of concerns and research needs, and quick spot surveys. If you have a contaminated sediment site, this is the virtual workshop for you!

Risk assessment is essential for the development and selection of appropriate cleanup goals at sites. The second session will address the following topics:
  • An overview of toxicity assessments,
  • Ecological considerations with a focus on bioaccumulation, and
  • Benchmark use in screening level human health and ecological risk assessments and updates regarding benchmark gaps and recent advances.

Contaminated Sediments Virtual Workshop Session 3 - Remediation Technologies

The US EPA Office of Research and Development / Office of Science Policy (ORD/OSP) in cooperation with the Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) is sponsoring a 4-part virtual workshop series to address current challenges at contaminated sediment sites. The aim of the virtual workshop is to provide interactive discussions between subject matter expert panelists and workshop participants. Consequently, each virtual session will feature brief topic introductions by panelists followed by facilitated panelist/participant discussions which will include opportunities for questions and answers, brainstorming, identification of concerns and research needs, and quick spot surveys. If you have a contaminated sediment site, this is the virtual workshop for you!

The third session will focus on both innovative and established remediation technologies available for contaminated sediment sites, as well as technology selection criteria. The third session will address the following topics:
  • Remediating mercury-contaminated sediment sites,
  • Selection criteria for sediment remediation technologies,
  • PCB dechlorinating and degrading with bioamended GAC, and
  • Reactive caps for dissolved and non-aqueous phase-liquids (NAPL).

Contaminated Sediments Virtual Workshop Session 4 - Long-Term Monitoring

The US EPA Office of Research and Development / Office of Science Policy (ORD/OSP) in cooperation with the Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) is sponsoring a 4-part virtual workshop series to address current challenges at contaminated sediment sites. The aim of the virtual workshop is to provide interactive discussions between subject matter expert panelists and workshop participants. Consequently, each virtual session will feature brief topic introductions by panelists followed by facilitated panelist/participant discussions which will include opportunities for questions and answers, brainstorming, identification of concerns and research needs, and quick spot surveys. If you have a contaminated sediment site, this is the virtual workshop for you!

The fourth session will focus on long-term monitoring to determine the effectiveness of the selected remedy and to assess the ecological recovery of the sediment area. The fourth session will discuss the following topics:
  • Developing and using surface weighted average concentrations (SWAC),
  • Passive sampling to assess remedy effectiveness, and
  • Use of recently developed pore water remedial goals (PWRG) for ecological recovery monitoring at a sediment site.

Harnessing Natural River Processes to Remediate 120 km of the Big River in Jefferson County, Missouri

The Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) Denver Post and Philadelphia Post along with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are hosting a series of webinars based on talks given at recent Design and Construction Issues at Hazardous Waste Sites (DCHWS) Symposiums. The mission of the DCHWS symposiums is to facilitate an interactive engagement between professionals from government and the private sector related to relevant and topical issues affecting applications of engineering and science associated with cleaning up hazardous waste sites. The symposiums also serve as a platform to facilitate the exchange of information, encourage dialogue, share experiences, and build and enhance communication among design and construction professionals.

This session will highlight a talk from the Third Western Symposium Design and Construction Issues at Hazardous Waste Sites (DCHWS) held November 5-7, 2018. The presentation will discuss a project now in the Feasibility Study (FS) stage, which has developed unit costs for key technologies that will be used in the Big River FS. The site team will have draft alternatives (incorporating sediment traps, bank stabilization, and conventional technologies) developed by the end of August 2019 and be ready for discussion. A side-by-side discussion of remedial strategy for Big River watershed and remedial strategy for Spring River watershed will be included. Big River focuses on larger river channel further away from historic sources. Spring River focuses on smaller, more dynamic tributary channels with historic sources distributed around the watershed in close proximity to impacted streams. The comparison will illustrate how the larger strategy can be adapted to site-specific conditions. Also, the site team plans to have multiple pilot tests of innovative technologies. One of the pilots is finished, with two in progress now. The presentation will highlight how the team is applying pilot testing to refine the application of these innovative technologies prior to full scale remediation.

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Federal Facility Five-Year Review

Federal Facility Five-Year Review Webinar is a two-hour webinar course that provides an overview of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) five-year reviews. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Understand Five-Year Review purpose and regulatory context
  • Learn how to prepare and conduct a five-year review
  • Identify the information and data needed to support a protectiveness statement
  • Address emerging contaminants and options available to ensure that the federal agencies address these contaminants
  • Identify the different scenarios when EPA makes an independent finding of the protectiveness of the remedy
  • Learn about similarities and differences between federal and private site five-year reviews

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, case studies, and quizzes. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course are federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding the CERCLA process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Military Munitions Policy

Military Munitions Policy Webinar is a two-hour webinar course that provides an overview of the Department of Defense (DoD) Military Munitions Response Program (MMRP), munitions policies, and how the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) is applied to munitions sites. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Learn about DoD MMRP;
  • Understand the CERCLA process as applied to a munitions site;
  • Understand munitions policies; and,
  • Explore EPA Munitions Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, case studies, and quizzes. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course are federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of munitions and the CERCLA process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Community Involvement at Federal Facilities

Community Involvement at Federal Facilities is a two-hour webinar course that focuses on community involvement requirements, resources, and techniques available for Federal Facilities being cleaned up at National Priorities List (NPL) sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). By taking the course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Learn about community involvement requirements under CERCLA;
  • Understand the roles of the lead federal agency and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in public involvement at Federal Facilities;
  • Discover resources and tools available for community involvement activities;
  • Explore community involvement techniques and approaches that can be used at Superfund sites; and,
  • Identify community involvement opportunities throughout the Superfund process at Federal Facilities.

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, case studies, and group discussions. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of the CERCLA process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: RODs (Records of Decision) and More at Federal Facilities

RODs [Records of Decision] and More at Federal Facilities is a two-hour webinar course that will provide an overview of how early and interim actions, adaptive management, RODs, Explanations of Significant Differences (ESDs), and ROD Amendments are used at Federal Facilities. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Understand how removal actions, sampling and analysis plans, and decision documents are used at Federal Facilities;
  • Learn about the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Department of Energy (DoE) Joint Policy Memo;
  • Identify how Interim Actions can be used as part of an overall cleanup strategy; and,
  • Learn the process for changing remedies after a ROD is issued.

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, group discussions, case studies, and quizzes. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Coordinating with Tribes at Federal Facilities

Coordinating with Tribes at Federal Facilities is a two-hour webinar course that will provide an overview of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) policy on consultation and coordination with Indian Tribes at federal facilities. This webinar will also provide tips on how to work more collaboratively during this process. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Identify EPA processes and policies for interacting with the Tribes;
  • Understand the roles of EPA and tribal governments in Federal Facility clean ups;
  • Learn about the Federal Facilities Restoration and Reuse Office (FFRRO); and,
  • Discover EPA resources and tools available to assist Federal Facilities in building partnerships with the Tribes;

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, group discussions, and case studies. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: RCRA and CERCLA Integration at Federal Facilities

RCRA and CERCLA Integration at Federal Facilities is a two-hour webinar course that will provide an overview of how the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) can be integrated at Federal Facilities through use of Federal Facility Agreements, regulator coordination, and lead regulator approach. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Learn about Federal Facility Agreements and how they identify RCRA and CERCLA roles and responsibilities;
  • Explore relevant memos and policies addressing RCRA and CERCLA coordination; and,
  • Become familiar with some RCRA policies that apply to CERCLA wastes.

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, case studies, and quizzes. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of RCRA and CERCLA. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Resolving Issues Before Formal Dispute

Resolving Issues Before Formal Dispute is a two-hour webinar course that identifies less formal options to address conflict before going to dispute under a federal facility agreement. This webinar provides project management tips and techniques to address disagreements early in the process. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Identify factors that contribute to conflict when working with team members from different agencies;
  • Learn how to prepare a team to handle conflict;
  • Explore tips and techniques to improve communication and come to resolution; and,
  • Understand when formal dispute should be considered.

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, group discussions, case studies, and quizzes. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Role of Superfund Performance Measures

Role of Superfund Performance Measures is a two-hour webinar course that will identify the role of performance measures, including environmental indicators, how to justify their status, and how to achieve an under-control status at Superfund sites. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Discover the origin and role of Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) Measures;
  • Explore the different types of internal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) planning targets reported through the Superfund Enterprise Management System (SEMs) database; and,
  • Learn about Environmental Indicators for Human Exposure and Groundwater Migration and how they are determined.

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, group discussion, and quizzes. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Determining ARARs at Federal Facility Sites

Determining ARARs at Federal Facility Sites is a two-hour webinar course that will highlight how to determine Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) in decision-documents based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance, identify commonly used ARARs, and when to involve partners. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Understand the general procedures for ARAR identification, analysis, and documentation;
  • Learn about ARARs under Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Section 121(d) and associated EPA guidance;
  • Identify the three types of ARARs and how they are determined; and,
  • Explore CERCLA ARAR waiver criteria and the six waivers identified under CERCLA 121(d).

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture and quizzes. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of ARARs and the CERCLA process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Groundwater Policy and Federal Facilities Overview

Groundwater Policy and Federal Facilities Overview is a two-hour webinar course that provides an overview of U.S Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater policies and guidance with emphasis on cleanups at federal facilities. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Identify EPA groundwater policies;
  • Understand groundwater classification and beneficial use in restoration objectives;
  • Understand nature and extent considerations from groundwater contaminant plumes;
  • Explore applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) commonly associated with groundwater remedies;
  • Identify groundwater considerations for monitored natural attenuation (MNA), institutional controls, and technical impracticability waivers; and,

  • Discover information on major groundwater policies from other federal agencies, such as Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Energy (DoE).

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture and quizzes. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

FRTR Presents...Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) Emerging Characterization and Remedial Technologies, Session 2

This is part of a webinar series featuring presentations delivered at the Fall 2018 FRTR Meeting and related material. The meeting's objective was to identify and discuss the emerging science behind PFAS characterization and remedial technologies. This session will include the following topics:
  • Perfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS)—Insights on the Collection and Analysis of Environmental Samples
  • PFAS Site Characterization

EPA Office of Research and Development's Office of Science Policy Mine and Mineral Processing Virtual Workshop Session 1 - Site Characterization

EPA's Office of Research and Development's Office of Science Policy and Center for Environmental Solutions & Emergency Response is sponsoring a 4-part virtual workshop series to address characterization, remediation, and response challenges at Superfund and legacy mining and mineral processing sites. Each virtual workshop will include a short lecture by various subject matter experts in their respective fields but will also allow ample time for the presenters to interact with the audience, including time for questions and answers as well as brainstorming and identifying concerns from stakeholders participating in each virtual workshop. If you have a mining reclamation or remediation site, this is the virtual workshop for you!

The first session will focus on site characterization. Various tools exist to help properly characterize mining sites. EPA ORD experts will provide perspective on the use of innovative technologies and approaches at mine sites, taking a wide-angle view from satellite imagery down to atomic scale tools.

EPA Office of Research and Development's Office of Science Policy Mine and Mineral Processing Virtual Workshop Session 2 - Emergency Management

EPA's Office of Research and Development's Office of Science Policy and Center for Environmental Solutions & Emergency Response is sponsoring a 4-part virtual workshop series to address characterization, remediation, and response challenges at Superfund and legacy mining and mineral processing sites. Each virtual workshop will include a short lecture by various subject matter experts in their respective fields but will also allow ample time for the presenters to interact with the audience, including time for questions and answers as well as brainstorming and identifying concerns from stakeholders participating in each virtual workshop. If you have a mining reclamation or remediation site, this is the virtual workshop for you!

The second session will focus on emergency management and response actions at mine and mineral processing sites including: wildfire response and impacts to mine treatment infrastructure, response activities at Bonita Peak Mining District, uranium impacts on Navajo lands, and response elements at mineral processing sites (Mississippi Phosphates). The session will explore potential impacts in assessing risk to both human health and the environment. Speakers from various EPA Regions will discuss emergency management activities at both time-critical and non-time-critical response actions sites.

EPA Office of Research and Development's Office of Science Policy Mine and Mineral Processing Virtual Workshop Session 3 - Innovative Technologies and Strategies

EPA's Office of Research and Development's Office of Science Policy and Center for Environmental Solutions & Emergency Response is sponsoring a 4-part virtual workshop series to address characterization, remediation, and response challenges at Superfund and legacy mining and mineral processing sites. Each virtual workshop will include a short lecture by various subject matter experts in their respective fields but will also allow ample time for the presenters to interact with the audience, including time for questions and answers as well as brainstorming and identifying concerns from stakeholders participating in each virtual workshop. If you have a mining reclamation or remediation site, this is the virtual workshop for you!

The third session will focus on innovative technologies and strategies available for mining sites. The session will present Superfund pilot sites that have integrated adaptive management approaches at their sites to help optimize the selected remedy and associated lessons learned. The session will also highlight recent technology advances and applications for active and passive treatment technologies at mine sites.

EPA Office of Research and Development's Office of Science Policy Mine and Mineral Processing Virtual Workshop Session 4 - Big Data

EPA's Office of Research and Development's Office of Science Policy and Center for Environmental Solutions & Emergency Response is sponsoring a 4-part virtual workshop series to address characterization, remediation, and response challenges at Superfund and legacy mining and mineral processing sites. Each virtual workshop will include a short lecture by various subject matter experts in their respective fields but will also allow ample time for the presenters to interact with the audience, including time for questions and answers as well as brainstorming and identifying concerns from stakeholders participating in each virtual workshop. If you have a mining reclamation or remediation site, this is the virtual workshop for you!

The fourth session will focus on the use of big data at mining sites. Topics include new 3DVA efforts at Superfund sites; fate and transport at watershed scales; and visualization of mining data.

OBLR RE-Development Academy for Communities Webinar 2: Peering Into the Crystal Ball: How the Market Decides Future Use!

If you build it, they might not come. If you dream it, a developer may not be interested. This webinar will cover the basics of real estate market analysis and what drives development. Whether it's a commercial, residential, or industrial development, developers have specific criteria they are looking for. Participants will learn the difference between types of developers, basic criteria to use when evaluating development teams, and what developers look for in real estate deals. Strategies for attracting development in tough markets will be explored. The objective is to develop an understanding of how developers make decisions and how to re-position sites and neighborhoods for private investment. Participants also will learn about the latest market trends and strategies for attracting developers to tough markets.

This is the second webinar in a FREE webinar series for the Office of Brownfields and Land Revitalization's (OBLR) RE-Development Academy for Communities, which also includes a half-day workshop at the 2019 National Brownfields Training Conference. Together, they comprise a single, full Academy program designed to provide community members with a general understanding of real estate and brownfields redevelopment. Each session builds on information and skills covered in each of the previous sessions in the series and a workshop at the conference where you will compete to redevelop a most valuable and complicated brownfields site. Your participation in each session will ensure you get the most out of the training.

This webinar is being offered for community members (including local governments, economic development and environmental protection departments, community nonprofits, brownfield redevelopment agencies & other local stakeholders), technical assistance providers, and state and tribal partners.

OBLR RE-Development Academy for Communities Webinar 3: Pulling Back the Curtain: How Developers Make Money

Why does it cost so much? This webinar focuses on what goes into a real estate development project and how it is financed. We will review a proforma and discuss sources of capital, uses of funds, and expectations for profit. We will introduce how environmental issues impact the finance process and how they are addressed. The objective is to develop an understanding of what it takes to pay for a development project and what investors need to provide funds for redevelopment.

This is the third webinar in a FREE webinar series for the Office of Brownfields and Land Revitalization's (OBLR) RE-Development Academy for Communities, which also includes a half-day workshop at the 2019 National Brownfields Training Conference. Together, they comprise a single, full Academy program designed to provide community members with a general understanding of real estate and brownfields redevelopment. Each session builds on information and skills covered in each of the previous sessions in the series and a workshop at the conference where you will compete to redevelop a most valuable and complicated brownfields site. Your participation in each session will ensure you get the most out of the training.

This webinar is being offered for community members (including local governments, economic development and environmental protection departments, community nonprofits, brownfield redevelopment agencies & other local stakeholders), technical assistance providers, and state and tribal partners.

Bioremediation - Expanding the Toolbox: Session I - The Microbiome

The NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) is hosting a Risk e-Learning webinar series emphasizing new approaches to elucidate mechanisms responsible for bioremediation. The series will feature innovative molecular, biochemical, cellular, and/or engineering tools to advance our understanding of the structural and functional properties of microorganisms or plants involved in the bioremediation of hazardous substances.

The first session will serve as an introduction to the series and will touch on opportunities to build linkages with other microbiome fields of study, such as the human microbiome.

SRP Director William A. Suk, Ph.D., will introduce the series, highlighting SRP grantees' contribution to innovation in bioremediation. The SRP funds multidisciplinary research to address the complex and evolving challenges associated with Superfund and related hazardous waste sites, including the development of new remediation technologies. Dr. Suk will provide an overview of the findings from past SRP bioremediation research, from basic discoveries to cost-saving field applications, and will introduce potential opportunities to expand the bioremediation toolbox.

James Tiedje, Ph.D., from the Michigan State University SRP Center, will discuss the past and future of microbiome science, which transcends habitats. The major questions, methods, and underlying biology of microbiome science are very similar, so much is transferable among studies in the soil, gut, ocean, and other systems. There are important differences in the details, but the details are not the starting point. In this talk, Tiedje will summarize what we have learned from the past in microbial ecology that helps us project the future and then will speculate on that future and how it may impact and likely facilitate SRP-relevant microbiome research.

Microbial communities mediate important transformations of environmental arsenic. These biotransformations dictate the bioavailability and toxicity of arsenic in environments ranging from soil to the human gut. Raina Maier, Ph.D., and Paul Carini, Ph.D., from the University of Arizona SRP Center, will discuss new integrative tools that combine plant transcriptomics, microbial meta(genomics), and high throughput microbial culturing to link key taxa to specific arsenic biotransformations important to both phytoremediation processes and human health.

Bioremediation - Expanding the Toolbox: Session II - Novel Omics Approaches

The NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) is hosting a Risk e-Learning webinar series emphasizing new approaches to elucidate mechanisms responsible for bioremediation. The series will feature innovative molecular, biochemical, cellular, and/or engineering tools to advance our understanding of the structural and functional properties of microorganisms or plants involved in the bioremediation of hazardous substances.

The second session will highlight innovative genomic approaches to enhance bioremediation by microbes and plants.

At Duke University, Claudia Gunsch, Ph.D., leads a research team developing a framework for precision bioremediation. The team seeks to maximize biodegradation potential by identifying optimal microbial targets for biostimulation, bioaugmentation, and genetic bioaugmentation given a site's microbial and biogeochemical fingerprints. This work includes characterization of several Superfund sites in North Carolina and Virginia.

Julian Schroeder, Ph.D., from the University of California, San Diego SRP Center, will discuss molecular mechanisms of heavy metal detoxification and remediation in plants. Many human diseases have been attributed to environmental contamination by toxic heavy metals, in particular lead, mercury and cadmium, and the metalloid arsenic. Plants play a key role in mediating human exposure to toxic metals and the metalloid arsenic in two ways: 1) people consume toxic metal(loid)-containing plants (diverse foods, tobacco products) and 2) non-crop plants can be used to remove heavy metals and arsenic from the environment for bioremediation. Extensive redundancy in plant genes has been an obstacle to understanding processes mediating toxic heavy metal(loid) accumulation in plants. Newly developed genome-wide artificial microRNA libraries will be presented that can now identify the genes, signal transduction pathways, and mechanisms underlying heavy metal(loid) accumulation in plants. This knowledge is crucial to reducing human exposure to toxic heavy metal(loid)s.

Bioremediation - Expanding the Toolbox: Session III - Emerging Opportunities

The NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) is hosting a Risk e-Learning webinar series emphasizing new approaches to elucidate mechanisms responsible for bioremediation. The series will feature innovative molecular, biochemical, cellular, and/or engineering tools to advance our understanding of the structural and functional properties of microorganisms or plants involved in the bioremediation of hazardous substances.

The third session will highlight new and emerging tools to improve existing bioremediation approaches and improve human health.

Pedro Alvarez, Ph.D., from Rice University, will discuss opportunities for nanotechnology-enabled in situ remediation technologies to address soil and groundwater contamination. Complex subsurface contamination domains and limited efficacy of existing treatment approaches pose significant challenges to site remediation and underscore the need for technological innovation to develop cost-effective remedies. This discussion will cover candidate nanomaterials and their applications to complement existing remediation approaches, as well as potential barriers for implementation and strategies and research needs to overcome these barriers.

Dora Taggart, an SRP Small Business grantee from Microbial Insights, will discuss their work to understand how environmental microbes are protecting our health. Research has consistently shown that human health is deeply intertwined with the gut microbiome, and new studies are illuminating the ways in which environmental contaminants are affecting, and are affected by, those microbes - sometimes even increasing in toxicity throughout the process. Through qPCR, isotopic analyses, metabolomics, and other molecular biological tools, technology advancements and novel approaches are finally allowing scientists to understand the beneficial impacts that active microbial contaminant degraders can have on human microbiomes. This presentation will highlight the information that these tools can provide and will discuss some of the new groundbreaking methods that will soon be common in the industry.

Ameen Razavi, an SRP Small Business grantee from Microvi Biotechnologies, will discuss microenvironmental impacts on the induction kinetics of cometabolism for the bioremediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons. The effectiveness of aerobic cometabolism-based bioremediation strategies for chlorinated hydrocarbons is tightly linked to the sustained induction of specific enzyme classes using primary metabolites, or inducers. This presentation provides an overview of aerobic cometabolism with an emphasis on emerging concepts for enhancing induction kinetics. Data from laboratory-scale and field pilot systems will be presented to illustrate translational applications and identify continuing research and knowledge gaps.

Superfund Redevelopment Initiative Series: Successful Superfund Redevelopment & the Prospective Purchaser Inquiry Tool: Solitron Microwave Site Case Study

Location, location, location...and liability protection! EPA works with bona fide prospective purchasers to help them understand liability protections and any site use restrictions in order to successfully develop Superfund sites during and after cleanup. This webinar will use the real world example of the Solitron Microwave Superfund site to provide an overview of liability protections and best practices to successfully redevelop Superfund sites across the nation.
Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soil: Considerations for Human Health Risk Assessment

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Risk-based cleanup goals are often calculated assuming that chemicals present in soil are absorbed by humans as efficiently as the chemicals dosed during the toxicity tests used to determine regulatory toxicity values (such as the Reference Dose or Cancer Slope Factor). This assumption can result in inaccurate exposure estimates and associated risks for some contaminated sites because the amount of a chemical absorbed (the chemical's bioavailability) from contaminated soil can be a fraction of the total amount present. Properly accounting for soil-chemical interactions on the bioavailability of chemicals from soil can lead to more accurate estimates of exposures to soil contaminants and improve risk assessments by decreasing uncertainty.
The basis for this training course is the ITRC guidance: Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soil: Considerations for Human Health Risk Assessment (BCS-1). This guidance describes the general concepts of the bioavailability of contaminants in soil, reviews the state of the science, and discusses how to incorporate bioavailability into the human health risk assessment process. This guidance addresses lead, arsenic, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) because evaluating bioavailability is better understood for these chemicals than for others, particularly for the incidental ingestion of soil.
The target audience for this guidance and training course are:
  • Project managers interested in decreasing uncertainty in the risk assessment which may lead to reduced remedial action costs.
  • Risk assessors new to bioavailability or those who want additional confidence and training in the current methods and common practices for using bioavailability assessment to more accurately determine human health risk at a contaminated site.
As a participant in this training you should learn to:
  • Value the ITRC document as a "go-to" resource for soil bioavailability
  • Apply the decision process to determine when a site-specific bioavailability assessment may be appropriate
  • Use the ITRC Review Checklist to develop or review a risk assessment that includes soil bioavailability
  • Consider factors that affect arsenic, lead and PAH bioavailability
  • Select appropriate methods to evaluate soil bioavailability
  • Use tools to develop site-specific soil bioavailability estimates and incorporate them into human health risk assessment
Learners can envision themselves implementing the ITRC guidance through case study applications. Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soil: Considerations for Human Health Risk Assessment (BCS-1) prior to attending the class.

Connecting the Science to Managing LNAPL Sites a 3 Part Series

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Connecting the Science to Managing LNAPL Sites - 3-Part Series

The newly updated LNAPLs (Light Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids) 3-part training course series is based on the ITRC guidance: LNAPL Site Management: LCSM Evolution, Decision Process, and Remedial Technologies (LNAPL-3, 2018) and focuses on connecting the science to managing LNAPL sites and helping you:
  • Build upon your Understanding of LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface (Part 1)
  • Develop your LNAPL Conceptual Site Model and LNAPL Remedial Goals (Part 2)
  • Select/Implement LNAPL Technologies (Part 3)
After this training series, the expectation is that you will have the skills and understanding to use ITRC science-based resources to improve decision making at your LNAPL sites. For regulators and other government agency staff, this improved understanding can hopefully be incorporated into your own LNAPL programs.

It is recommended that participants have a general understanding of hydrogeology and some familiarity with petroleum contaminated sites. The courses will build on your existing LNAPL knowledge and outline the framework for making LNAPL remediation and management decisions. It is expected that participants will attend this 3-part training series in sequence.

LNAPL Training Part 1: Understanding LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface
Part 1 teaches how LNAPLs behave in the subsurface and examines what controls their behavior. Part 1:
  • Explains what LNAPL data can tell you about the LNAPL and site conditions
  • Covers how that information is applied to the development of an LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM) (Part 2) and LNAPL technology selection (Part 3)
Relevant and practical examples are used to illustrate key concepts.

LNAPL Training Part 2: LNAPL Conceptual Site Models and the LNAPL Decision Process
Part 2 teaches participants how to develop an LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM) and the overall framework for making LNAPL remediation and management decisions. Part 2:
  • Discusses key LNAPL and site data
  • Explains when and why those data may be important
  • Covers how to effectively organize the data into an LCSM
Part 2 also discusses how to address LNAPL concerns by selecting appropriate goals and objectives, choosing applicable technologies, and assigning remedial performance metrics and endpoints.

LNAPL Training Part 3: Using LNAPL Science, the LCSM, and LNAPL Goals to Select an LNAPL Remedial Technology
Part 3 of the training teaches the importance of informed remedial technology selection and appropriate technology application. Part 3:
  • Discusses remedial technology groups
  • Introduces specific and new remedial technologies
  • Reviews the technology selection process, how technologies can be combined to accelerate cleanup, and how the LCSM informs selection
A case study and examples demonstrate the use of these tools for remedial technology selection, implementation, and demonstration of successful remediation.
Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, LNAPL Site Management: LCSM Evolution, Decision Process, and Remedial Technologies (LNAPL-3, 2018), prior to attending the class.

Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Chemical contaminants in soil and groundwater can volatilize into soil gas and migrate through unsaturated soils of the vadose zone. Vapor intrusion (VI) occurs when these vapors migrate upward into overlying buildings through cracks and gaps in the building floors, foundations, and utility conduits, and contaminate indoor air. If present at sufficiently high concentrations, these vapors may present a threat to the health and safety of building occupants. Petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) is a subset of VI and is the process by which volatile petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) released as vapors from light nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPL), petroleum-contaminated soils, or petroleum-contaminated groundwater migrate through the vadose zone and into overlying buildings. Fortunately, in the case of PHC vapors, this migration is often limited by microorganisms that are normally present in soil. The organisms consume these chemicals, reducing them to nontoxic end products through the process of biodegradation. The extent and rate to which this natural biodegradation process occurs is strongly influenced by the concentration of the vapor source, the distance the vapors must travel through soil from the source to potential receptors, and the presence of oxygen (O2) in the subsurface environment between the source and potential receptors.

The ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance Web-Based Document, Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management (PVI-1, 2014) and this associated Internet-based training provides regulators and practitioners with consensus information based on empirical data and recent research to support PVI decision making under different regulatory frameworks. The PVI assessment strategy described in this guidance document enables confident decision making that protects human health for various types of petroleum sites and multiple PHC compounds. This guidance provides a comprehensive methodology for screening, investigating, and managing potential PVI sites and is intended to promote the efficient use of resources and increase confidence in decision making when evaluating the potential for vapor intrusion at petroleum-contaminated sites. By using the ITRC guidance document, the vapor intrusion pathway can be eliminated from further investigation at many sites where soil or groundwater is contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons or where LNAPL is present.

After attending this ITRC Internet-based training, participants should be able to:
  • Determine when and how to use the ITRC PVI document at their sites
  • Describe the important role of biodegradation impacts on the PVI pathway (in contrast to chlorinated solvent contaminated sites)
  • Value a PVI conceptual site model (CSM) and list its key components
  • Apply the ITRC PVI 8 step decision process to screen sites for the PVI pathway and determine actions to take if a site does not initially screen out, (e.g., site investigation, modeling, and vapor control and site management)
  • Access fact sheets to support community engagement activities at each step in the process
For reference during the training class, participants should have a copy of the flowcharts, Figures 1-2, 3-2, and 4-1 from the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance Web-Based Document, Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management (PVI-1, 2014) and are available as a 3-page PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/PVI/ITRC-PVI-FlowCharts.pdf


ITRC also offers a 2-day PVI focused classroom training at locations across the US. The classroom training provides participants the opportunity to learn more in-depth information about the PVI pathway and practice applying the ITRC PVI guidance document with a diverse group of environmental professionals. Learn more at the ITRC PVI classroom training page.