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CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
November 2019
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatContaminated Sediments Virtual Work...

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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatITRC Remediation Management of Comp...

Remediation Management of Complex Sites
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatITRC Characterization and Remediati...

Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatContaminated Sediments Virtual Work...

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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatITRC Long-term Contaminant Manageme...

Long-term Contaminant Management Using Institutional Controls
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatSubstrate Longevity and Long-Term P...

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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatFRTR Presents...Modeling in Support...

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CERCLA 108(b) Financial Responsibility Requirements Proposals for the Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing Industry and the Chemical Manufacturing Industry

On January 11, 2017, the Agency made a determination to proceed with rulemakings that will either develop proposed financial responsibility requirements under CERCLA 108(b), or determine such requirements are not warranted. The second and third of the three industries for which EPA is developing rulemaking proposals are for the Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing Industry and the Chemical Manufacturing Industry. This webinar will provide an overview of the rulemaking proposals.

Contaminated Sediments Virtual Workshop Session 3 - Remediation Technologies

The US EPA Office of Research and Development / Office of Science Policy (ORD/OSP) in cooperation with the Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) is sponsoring a 4-part virtual workshop series to address current challenges at contaminated sediment sites. The aim of the virtual workshop is to provide interactive discussions between subject matter expert panelists and workshop participants. Consequently, each virtual session will feature brief topic introductions by panelists followed by facilitated panelist/participant discussions which will include opportunities for questions and answers, brainstorming, identification of concerns and research needs, and quick spot surveys. If you have a contaminated sediment site, this is the virtual workshop for you!

Update: Based on the high interest in this series and feedback, the event has been extended to allow for more time questions with the presenters. All scheduled presentations with brief Q&A periods will be delivered as planned during the original time from 1 to 3:00pm eastern. Immediately following the scheduled presentations, presenters will remain on the webinar for an additional 30 minutes to address more questions and comments from the participants. If you are unable to stay on for the additional Q&A time, please know the entire event will be recorded and available to playback on demand including the additional Q&A time.

The third session will focus on both innovative and established remediation technologies available for contaminated sediment sites, as well as technology selection criteria. The third session will address the following topics:
  • Remediating mercury-contaminated sediment sites,
  • Selection criteria for sediment remediation technologies,
  • PCB dechlorinating and degrading with bioamended GAC, and
  • Reactive caps for dissolved and non-aqueous phase-liquids (NAPL).

Contaminated Sediments Virtual Workshop Session 4 - Long-Term Monitoring

The US EPA Office of Research and Development / Office of Science Policy (ORD/OSP) in cooperation with the Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) is sponsoring a 4-part virtual workshop series to address current challenges at contaminated sediment sites. The aim of the virtual workshop is to provide interactive discussions between subject matter expert panelists and workshop participants. Consequently, each virtual session will feature brief topic introductions by panelists followed by facilitated panelist/participant discussions which will include opportunities for questions and answers, brainstorming, identification of concerns and research needs, and quick spot surveys. If you have a contaminated sediment site, this is the virtual workshop for you!

Update: Based on the high interest in this series and feedback, the event has been extended to allow for more time questions with the presenters. All scheduled presentations with brief Q&A periods will be delivered as planned during the original time from 1 to 2:30pm eastern. Immediately following the scheduled presentations, presenters will remain on the webinar for an additional 30 minutes to address more questions and comments from the participants. If you are unable to stay on for the additional Q&A time, please know the entire event will be recorded and available to playback on demand including the additional Q&A time.

The fourth session will focus on long-term monitoring to determine the effectiveness of the selected remedy and to assess the ecological recovery of the sediment area. The fourth session will discuss the following topics:
  • Developing and using surface weighted average concentrations (SWAC),
  • Passive sampling to assess remedy effectiveness, and
  • Use of recently developed pore water remedial goals (PWRG) for ecological recovery monitoring at a sediment site.

Substrate Longevity and Long-Term Performance of Biochemical Reactors for Passive Treatment of Mine-Impacted Water

The Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) Denver Post and Philadelphia Post along with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are hosting a series of webinars based on talks given at recent Design and Construction Issues at Hazardous Waste Sites (DCHWS) Symposiums. The mission of the DCHWS symposiums is to facilitate an interactive engagement between professionals from government and the private sector related to relevant and topical issues affecting applications of engineering and science associated with cleaning up hazardous waste sites. The symposiums also serve as a platform to facilitate the exchange of information, encourage dialogue, share experiences, and build and enhance communication among design and construction professionals.

Biochemical reactors (BCR) have become an important treatment unit within passive treatment systems (PTS) designed for mine impacted water; however, operational longevity has remained a persistent concern. This presentation will present an overview on the background, history and principles on the use of BCRs to treat mine-impacted water. This will include a detailed review of the configuration, operation and performance of a typical BCR system and will provide data and observations from two long-term (>8 years) operating BCR systems as examples. This presentation will demonstrate that BCRs are an effective low cost, long term, and sustainable option for meeting water quality targets of mine impacted waters. This presentation will be a continuum of the two presentations previously presented (2018, 2019) in the DCHWS West forums. Both of the previous presentations focused on design, construction, and operation, while this presentation will focus on operation and maintenance, long-term performance, and overall system operational lifespan.

Construction Manager Perspective: Lessons Learned Implementing the Superfund Job Training Initiative (Super JTI)

The Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) Denver Post and Philadelphia Post along with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are hosting a series of webinars based on talks given at recent Design and Construction Issues at Hazardous Waste Sites (DCHWS) Symposiums. The mission of the DCHWS symposiums is to facilitate an interactive engagement between professionals from government and the private sector related to relevant and topical issues affecting applications of engineering and science associated with cleaning up hazardous waste sites. The symposiums also serve as a platform to facilitate the exchange of information, encourage dialogue, share experiences, and build and enhance communication among design and construction professionals.

This presentation will discuss the Superfund Joint Training Initiative (JTI) implementation as part of the remedial action at the Fairfax Street Wood Treating Site in Jacksonville, Florida. The Superfund JTI program is a job readiness and training program that targets areas and citizens that are affected by Superfund sites and tries to involve underemployment or unemployed community members in the Superfund process thru training and potential employment. The process includes participation of community partners in the area to assist in getting the word out for the opportunity, candidates are screened by an evaluation panel (typically including EPA, EPA RA Contractor, Constructor, and local leaders), and then selected to be part of the training program. Upon completing he training program, the graduates are then eligible to be interviewed with the potential to be hired by the RA Constructor. Lessons learned from all stages of the RA implementation (initiation, procurement, planning, communication, and field execution (subcontractor hiring process) will be highlighted in the webinars. Specifically the presentation will discuss identifying certain expectations and objectives of the client, incorporating those objectives of Superfund JTI program into bid documents and developing appropriate subcontractor selection criteria, establishing strong communication and co-operation with the RA subcontractor, synchronizing construction schedule with the Superfund JTI program training schedule, improving screening and assessment processes for the potential candidates selected for the program, recognizing in advance the challenges presented by the candidates limited skill sets and experience as it pertains to the site specific construction needs, and developing creative alternatives, solutions, and/or opportunities for the graduates with their involvement in the RA activities.

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Federal Facility Five-Year Review

Federal Facility Five-Year Review Webinar is a two-hour webinar course that provides an overview of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) five-year reviews. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Understand Five-Year Review purpose and regulatory context
  • Learn how to prepare and conduct a five-year review
  • Identify the information and data needed to support a protectiveness statement
  • Address emerging contaminants and options available to ensure that the federal agencies address these contaminants
  • Identify the different scenarios when EPA makes an independent finding of the protectiveness of the remedy
  • Learn about similarities and differences between federal and private site five-year reviews

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, case studies, and quizzes. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course are federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding the CERCLA process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Military Munitions Policy

Military Munitions Policy Webinar is a two-hour webinar course that provides an overview of the Department of Defense (DoD) Military Munitions Response Program (MMRP), munitions policies, and how the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) is applied to munitions sites. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Learn about DoD MMRP;
  • Understand the CERCLA process as applied to a munitions site;
  • Understand munitions policies; and,
  • Explore EPA Munitions Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, case studies, and quizzes. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course are federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of munitions and the CERCLA process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Coordinating with Tribes at Federal Facilities

Coordinating with Tribes at Federal Facilities is a two-hour webinar course that will provide an overview of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) policy on consultation and coordination with Indian Tribes at federal facilities. This webinar will also provide tips on how to work more collaboratively during this process. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Identify EPA processes and policies for interacting with the Tribes;
  • Understand the roles of EPA and tribal governments in Federal Facility clean ups;
  • Learn about the Federal Facilities Restoration and Reuse Office (FFRRO); and,
  • Discover EPA resources and tools available to assist Federal Facilities in building partnerships with the Tribes;

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, group discussions, and case studies. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: RCRA and CERCLA Integration at Federal Facilities

RCRA and CERCLA Integration at Federal Facilities is a two-hour webinar course that will provide an overview of how the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) can be integrated at Federal Facilities through use of Federal Facility Agreements, regulator coordination, and lead regulator approach. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Learn about Federal Facility Agreements and how they identify RCRA and CERCLA roles and responsibilities;
  • Explore relevant memos and policies addressing RCRA and CERCLA coordination; and,
  • Become familiar with some RCRA policies that apply to CERCLA wastes.

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, case studies, and quizzes. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of RCRA and CERCLA. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Resolving Issues Before Formal Dispute

Resolving Issues Before Formal Dispute is a two-hour webinar course that identifies less formal options to address conflict before going to dispute under a federal facility agreement. This webinar provides project management tips and techniques to address disagreements early in the process. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Identify factors that contribute to conflict when working with team members from different agencies;
  • Learn how to prepare a team to handle conflict;
  • Explore tips and techniques to improve communication and come to resolution; and,
  • Understand when formal dispute should be considered.

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, group discussions, case studies, and quizzes. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Role of Superfund Performance Measures

Role of Superfund Performance Measures is a two-hour webinar course that will identify the role of performance measures, including environmental indicators, how to justify their status, and how to achieve an under-control status at Superfund sites. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Discover the origin and role of Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) Measures;
  • Explore the different types of internal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) planning targets reported through the Superfund Enterprise Management System (SEMs) database; and,
  • Learn about Environmental Indicators for Human Exposure and Groundwater Migration and how they are determined.

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, group discussion, and quizzes. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Determining ARARs at Federal Facility Sites

Determining ARARs at Federal Facility Sites is a two-hour webinar course that will highlight how to determine Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) in decision-documents based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance, identify commonly used ARARs, and when to involve partners. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Understand the general procedures for ARAR identification, analysis, and documentation;
  • Learn about ARARs under Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Section 121(d) and associated EPA guidance;
  • Identify the three types of ARARs and how they are determined; and,
  • Explore CERCLA ARAR waiver criteria and the six waivers identified under CERCLA 121(d).

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture and quizzes. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of ARARs and the CERCLA process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Groundwater Policy and Federal Facilities Overview

Groundwater Policy and Federal Facilities Overview is a two-hour webinar course that provides an overview of U.S Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater policies and guidance with emphasis on cleanups at federal facilities. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Identify EPA groundwater policies;
  • Understand groundwater classification and beneficial use in restoration objectives;
  • Understand nature and extent considerations from groundwater contaminant plumes;
  • Explore applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) commonly associated with groundwater remedies;
  • Identify groundwater considerations for monitored natural attenuation (MNA), institutional controls, and technical impracticability waivers; and,

  • Discover information on major groundwater policies from other federal agencies, such as Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Energy (DoE).

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture and quizzes. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

FRTR Presents...Modeling in Support of Site Remediation, Session 1

This is part of a webinar series featuring presentations delivered at the Spring 2019 FRTR Meeting and related material. This session will include the following topics:
  • Recognizing Critical Processes and Scales in Conceptual Site Models for Developing Decision Support Tools at Sites of Groundwater Contamination
  • Simple vs. Complex Modeling: Choosing the Appropriate Level of Complexity When Using Groundwater Modeling in Remediation
  • Developing Long-Term Monitoring Strategies for Radiological Contamination Thru Modeling & Machine Learning — Demonstrations at Fukushima and Savannah River Site

FRTR Presents...Modeling in Support of Site Remediation, Session 2

This is part of a webinar series featuring presentations delivered at the Spring 2019 FRTR Meeting and related material. This session will include the following topics:
  • U.S. EPA Experience in Using Models to Support Remediation
  • Role of Modeling in the Remediation of the WP14/LF15 Chlorinated Solvent Plume at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware
  • Tooele Army Ordnance Depot — Continuous Improvement of a Groundwater Model for Remedy Decision-Making over a 25-Year Period
Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Characterization and remediation of contaminated groundwater in fractured rock has not been conducted or studied as broadly as groundwater at unconsolidated porous media sites. This unfamiliarity and lack of experience can make fractured rock sites perplexing. This situation is especially true in portions of the U.S. where bedrock aquifers are a primary source of drinking and process water, and demands on water are increasing. As a result, remedial activities often default to containment of contaminant plumes, point of use treatment and long-term monitoring rather than active reduction of risk. However, this attitude does not incorporate recent advances in the science and technology of fractured rock site characterization and remediation.
The basis for this training course is the ITRC guidance: Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock. The purpose of this guidance is to dispel the belief that fractured rock sites are too complex to characterize and remediate. The physical, chemical and contaminant transport concepts in fractured rock have similarities to unconsolidated porous media, yet there are important differences. These differences are the focus of this guidance.

By participating in this training class, you should learn to:
  • Use ITRC's Fractured Rock Document to guide your decision making so you can:
  • Develop quality Conceptual Site Models (CSMs) for fractured rock sites
  • Set realistic remedial objectives
  • Select the best remedial options
  • Monitor remedial progress and assess results
  • Value an interdisciplinary site team approach to bring collective expertise to improve decision making and to have confidence when going beyond containment and monitoring - - to actually remediating fractured rock sites.
Case studies of successful fractured rock remediation are presented to provide examples of how fractured rock sites can be evaluated and available tools applied to characterization and remediation.
Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock prior to attending the class.

Long-term Contaminant Management Using Institutional Controls

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Institutional controls (ICs) are administrative or legal restrictions that provide protection from exposure to contaminants on a site. When ICs are jeopardized or fail, direct exposure to human health and the environment can occur. While a variety of guidance and research to date has focused on the implementation of ICs, ITRC's Long-term Contaminant Management Using Institutional Controls (IC-1, 2016) guidance and this associated training class focuses on post-implementation IC management, including monitoring, evaluation, stakeholder communications, enforcement, and termination. The ITRC guidance and training will assist those who are responsible for the management and stewardship of Ics. ITRC has developed a downloadable tool that steps users through the process of planning and designing IC management needs. This tool can help to create a long lasting record of the site that includes the regulatory authority, details of the IC, the responsibilities of all parties, a schedule for monitoring the performance of the IC, and more. The tool generates an editable Long Term Stewardship (LTS) plan in Microsoft Word.

After attending the training, participants will be able to:
  • Describe best practices and evolving trends for IC management at individual sites and across state agency programs
  • Use this guidance to
    • Improve IC reliability and prevent IC failures
    • Improve existing, or develop new, IC Management programs
    • Identify the pros and cons about differing IC management approaches
  • Use the tools to establish an LTS plan for specific sites
  • Use the elements in the tools to understand the information that should populate an IC registry or data management system.

The target audience for this guidance includes environmental regulators at all levels of government, private and public responsible or obligated parties (Ops), current site owners and operators, environmental consultants, and prospective purchasers of property and their agents. Other stakeholders who have an interest in a property can also use this guidance to help understand how to manage Ics.

Remediation Management of Complex Sites

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council At some sites, complex site-specific conditions make it difficult to fully remediate environmental contamination. Both technical and nontechnical challenges can impede remediation and may prevent a site from achieving federal- and state-mandated regulatory cleanup goals within a reasonable time frame. For example, technical challenges may include geologic, hydrogeologic, geochemical, and contaminant-related conditions as well as large-scale or surface conditions. In addition, nontechnical challenges may also play a role such as managing changes that occur over long time frames, overlapping regulatory and financial responsibilities between agencies, setting achievable site objectives, maintaining effective institutional controls, redevelopment and changes in land use, and funding considerations.
This training course and associated ITRC guidance: Remediation Management of Complex Sites (RMCS-1, 2017), provide a recommended holistic process for management of challenging sites, termed "adaptive site management." This process is a comprehensive, flexible, and iterative process that is well-suited for sites where there is significant uncertainty in remedy performance predictions. Adaptive site management includes the establishment of interim objectives and long-term site objectives that consider both technical and nontechnical challenges. Periodic adjustment of the remedial approach may involve multiple technologies at any one time and changes in technologies over time. Comprehensive planning and scheduled evaluations of remedy performance help decision makers track remedy progress and improve the timeliness of remedy optimization, reevaluations, or transition to other technologies/contingency actions.
By participating in this training course we expect you will learn to apply the ITRC guidance document to:
  • Identify and integrate technical and nontechnical challenges into a holistic approach to remediation
  • Use the Remediation Potential Assessment to identify whether adaptive site management is warranted due to site complexity
  • Understand and apply adaptive site management principles
  • Develop a long-term performance-based action plan
  • Apply well-demonstrated techniques for effective stakeholder engagement
  • Access additional resources, tools, and case studies most relevant for complex sites
  • Communicate the value of the guidance to regulators, practitioners, community members, and others
Ultimately, using the guidance that can lead to better decision making and remediation management at complex sites. The guidance is intended to benefit a variety of site decision makers, including regulators, responsible parties and their consultants, and public and tribal stakeholders.
Case studies are used to describe real-world applications of remediation and remediation management at complex sites. Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance Remediation Management of Complex Sites (RMCS-1, 2017) prior to attending the class.

TPH Risk Evaluation at Petroleum-Contaminated Sites

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Remediation at petroleum release sites is often infeasible for technical or cost reasons. Many of these sites could be depleted in typical indicator compounds, such as BTEXN, but still heavily contaminated in terms of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH). The traditional indicator compound approach for managing petroleum contaminants may not fully identify short- and long-term potential environmental concerns, can create delays in project schedules and cost overages for sub-surface utility work or redevelopment. It is important to consider a comprehensive cumulative risk-based approach to more effectively incorporate TPH data in addition to traditional BTEXN data for cleanup and long-term management decisions.

The basis for this training course is the ITRC guidance: TPH Risk Evaluation at Petroleum-Contaminated Sites (TPHRisk-1, 2018). The guidance builds on long-standing and current research and experience, and presents the current science for evaluating TPH risk at petroleum-contaminated sites. The methods and procedures to evaluate human and ecological risk and establish cleanup requirements in the various media at petroleum release sites will assist decision makers in developing and implementing a technically defensible approach. In addition, the guidance provides information and supplemental references to assist practitioners and project managers in the assessment of fate, transport, exposure, and toxicity of TPH. The guidance users will also gain information that may be used in conjunction with classic tiered approaches for risk-based decision making (ASTM 2015b, ITRC Risk 3 2015), including modifications in the assessment and remedial-decision and regulatory framework for TPH impacts through direct comparison to screening levels, site-specific modification of screening levels, and complete site-specific risk assessment for sources, receptors, and pathways, where appropriate.

The target audience for this guidance and training course is:
  • Regulators and Program Managers interested in knowing how site management decisions can influence the TPH risk evaluation process.
  • Risk assessors new to TPH data or those who want additional knowledge and training in the current methods and common practices for collecting and using TPH data in assessments to more accurately determine human health and/or ecological risks at petroleum-contaminated sites.
  • Stakeholders who are either engaged in redevelopment at former petroleum release sites or folks who are involved in community engagement and revitalization activities.
As a participant in this training you should learn to:
  • Recognize the ITRC document as a go-to resource for evaluating TPH risk at petroleum-contaminated sites
  • Recognize how TPH -impacted media interacts with the environment and changes over time
  • Select appropriate analytic method(s) to match site objectives
  • Apply the decision framework to determine when a site-specific target level may be more appropriate than a generic screening level for TPH
Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, TPH Risk Evaluation at Petroleum-Contaminated Sites (TPHRisk-1, 2018) prior to attending the class.

ITRC Panel Event: Stormwater Best Management Practices Performance Evaluation

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Are you interested in improving your stormwater best management practices (BMP) performance? Could you improve your performance evaluations on the front end with publicly available data and throughout the BMP lifecycle? If so, join us for this ITRC (Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council) interactive online panel session showcasing the ITRC Document: Stormwater Best Management Practices (BMP) Performance Evaluation (Stormwater-1) Oct-18. This panel event will provide you with:
  • Access to a centralized resource for information on stormwater BMP effectiveness
  • Guidance to use during post-construction BMP screening, selection, installation, operation, and monitoring and maintenance.
  • Case study examples using the guidance.
  • Answers to your questions about using ITRC's stormwater BMP tool and guidance
PREREQUISITE: BEFORE the event, please view the following videos EACH UNDER 5 MINUTES:
The panel session is intended to be a mix of interactive audience discussion and introductory material. Please come ready to ask questions and interact with the panel technical members.

In addition, panel participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, Stormwater Best Management Practices (BMP) Performance Evaluation (Stormwater-1) Oct-18. This guidance offers the user details on post-construction BMP lifecycle processes including contracting, cost considerations, installation factors including construction challenges, inspection checklists, quality control and record drawings. It goes on to address long-term technology- and performance-based operational strategies, including aspects such as routine and non-routine maintenance. Data and information from existing publicly available BMP performance programs has been incorporated into an online BMP Screening Tool. Using site-specific pollutant treatment requirements and installation considerations, the Tool can assist the user by identifying types of BMPs that may be appropriate for a given site. The Tool also provides users summarized information on the treatment efficiency, installation requirements and maintenance issues regarding the identified BMPs, with links to access more detailed information.

The target audience for this panel event is primarily state and local regulators involved in the process of stormwater BMP screening, selection, design, installation, operation and maintenance and monitoring. Others working on post-construction stormwater management will benefit as well, particularly consultants and new staff in the stormwater industry.

During the panel event registration process you may submit questions that may be addressed by panelist during the upcoming panel event.