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CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatMining Webinar Series: Eagle Mine S...

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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatITRC Bioavailability of Contaminant...

Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soil: Considerations for Human Health Risk Assessment
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatProUCL Utilization 2020: Part 1: Pr...

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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatSuperfund Redevelopment Roundtable ...

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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatCERCLA 108(b) Financial Responsibil...

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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatITRC Connecting the Science to Mana...

Connecting the Science to Managing LNAPL Sites a 3 Part Series - Part 3
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CERCLA 108(b) Financial Responsibility Requirements Proposals for the Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing Industry and the Chemical Manufacturing Industry

On January 11, 2017, the Agency made a determination to proceed with rulemakings that will either develop proposed financial responsibility requirements under CERCLA 108(b), or determine such requirements are not warranted. The second and third of the three industries for which EPA is developing rulemaking proposals are for the Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing Industry and the Chemical Manufacturing Industry. This webinar will provide an overview of the rulemaking proposals.

Design, Construction, and Optimization of a Large-Scale Combined In Situ Thermal Treatment and Enhanced Bioremediation Remedy

The Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) Denver Post and Philadelphia Post along with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are hosting a series of webinars based on talks given at recent Design and Construction Issues at Hazardous Waste Sites (DCHWS) Symposiums. The mission of the DCHWS symposiums is to facilitate an interactive engagement between professionals from government and the private sector related to relevant and topical issues affecting applications of engineering and science associated with cleaning up hazardous waste sites. The symposiums also serve as a platform to facilitate the exchange of information, encourage dialogue, share experiences, and build and enhance communication among design and construction professionals.

The presentation in Philadelphia focused on remedial design, construction, and operation of the in situ thermal treatment and enhanced bioremediation remedies. The webinar would provide an update on site progress since the end of 2017 and focus on the technical, contractual, and financial challenges associated with transitioning the project from EPA to the New Mexico Environmental Department after 10 years of RA-O. It will also cover the process of transitioning from ERD to monitored natural attenuation and long-term vapor intrusion mitigation and lessons learned. Finally, the webinar will present the GIS-based dashboard that we're using to integrate operation, VOC, geochemical, and microbial data to support continued system optimization (particularly ahead of the transition of RA-O to the state).

Reducing Cost Risk in Remedial Action Budgets Using Supplemental Analyses

The Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) Denver Post and Philadelphia Post along with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are hosting a series of webinars based on talks given at recent Design and Construction Issues at Hazardous Waste Sites (DCHWS) Symposiums. The mission of the DCHWS symposiums is to facilitate an interactive engagement between professionals from government and the private sector related to relevant and topical issues affecting applications of engineering and science associated with cleaning up hazardous waste sites. The symposiums also serve as a platform to facilitate the exchange of information, encourage dialogue, share experiences, and build and enhance communication among design and construction professionals.

The topic for our prior DCHWS West presentation was reducing cost risk in remedial action budgets using supplemental cost estimating analyses. As discussed during the presentation, the cost estimates for selected remedies in Records of Decision (RODs) that are used for remedial action budgeting often use simplified information (such as scope of work activities and related quantities) as opposed to remedial action (RA) construction cost estimates developed during remedial design. Remedial action budgets developed from the ROD selected remedy cost estimates have inherent limitations due to the use of the estimate (i.e. selecting a remedy through comparisons of alternatives). Due to differing stakeholder perspectives and potential overreliance on the selected remedy cost estimates developed during the ROD, there can be confusion about why the RA cost estimate prepared during Remedial Design is different than the cost estimate in the ROD. Differences between the selected remedy cost estimate in the ROD and the RA cost estimate can lead to difficulties with project execution including the need to request additional funding and/or schedule delays. Based on prior CERCLA project experiences, CDM Smith has developed tools consistent with cost estimating industry standards and EPA guidance that can be used to communicate the reasons for these differences in estimates including Basis of Estimate documents and ROD cost comparison tables. The additional information will focus on case studies and lessons learned from CERCLA projects that led to the development of these tools and explain how they help show the actual differences in remedy scope and related costs as the level of project definition increases during remedial design, for example why cost items that at first glance appear to be similar ("apples to apples") could actually differ ("apples and oranges").

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Federal Facility Five-Year Review

Federal Facility Five-Year Review Webinar is a two-hour webinar course that provides an overview of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) five-year reviews. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Understand Five-Year Review purpose and regulatory context
  • Learn how to prepare and conduct a five-year review
  • Identify the information and data needed to support a protectiveness statement
  • Address emerging contaminants and options available to ensure that the federal agencies address these contaminants
  • Identify the different scenarios when EPA makes an independent finding of the protectiveness of the remedy
  • Learn about similarities and differences between federal and private site five-year reviews

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, case studies, and quizzes. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course are federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding the CERCLA process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Military Munitions Policy

Military Munitions Policy Webinar is a two-hour webinar course that provides an overview of the Department of Defense (DoD) Military Munitions Response Program (MMRP), munitions policies, and how the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) is applied to munitions sites. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Learn about DoD MMRP;
  • Understand the CERCLA process as applied to a munitions site;
  • Understand munitions policies; and,
  • Explore EPA Munitions Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, case studies, and quizzes. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course are federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of munitions and the CERCLA process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: RCRA and CERCLA Integration at Federal Facilities

RCRA and CERCLA Integration at Federal Facilities is a two-hour webinar course that will provide an overview of how the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) can be integrated at Federal Facilities through use of Federal Facility Agreements, regulator coordination, and lead regulator approach. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Learn about Federal Facility Agreements and how they identify RCRA and CERCLA roles and responsibilities;
  • Explore relevant memos and policies addressing RCRA and CERCLA coordination; and,
  • Become familiar with some RCRA policies that apply to CERCLA wastes.

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, case studies, and quizzes. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of RCRA and CERCLA. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Resolving Issues Before Formal Dispute

Resolving Issues Before Formal Dispute is a two-hour webinar course that identifies less formal options to address conflict before going to dispute under a federal facility agreement. This webinar provides project management tips and techniques to address disagreements early in the process. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Identify factors that contribute to conflict when working with team members from different agencies;
  • Learn how to prepare a team to handle conflict;
  • Explore tips and techniques to improve communication and come to resolution; and,
  • Understand when formal dispute should be considered.

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, group discussions, case studies, and quizzes. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Role of Superfund Performance Measures

Role of Superfund Performance Measures is a two-hour webinar course that will identify the role of performance measures, including environmental indicators, how to justify their status, and how to achieve an under-control status at Superfund sites. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Discover the origin and role of Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) Measures;
  • Explore the different types of internal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) planning targets reported through the Superfund Enterprise Management System (SEMs) database; and,
  • Learn about Environmental Indicators for Human Exposure and Groundwater Migration and how they are determined.

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, group discussion, and quizzes. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Determining ARARs at Federal Facility Sites

Determining ARARs at Federal Facility Sites is a two-hour webinar course that will highlight how to determine Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) in decision-documents based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance, identify commonly used ARARs, and when to involve partners. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Understand the general procedures for ARAR identification, analysis, and documentation;
  • Learn about ARARs under Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Section 121(d) and associated EPA guidance;
  • Identify the three types of ARARs and how they are determined; and,
  • Explore CERCLA ARAR waiver criteria and the six waivers identified under CERCLA 121(d).

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture and quizzes. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of ARARs and the CERCLA process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

Federal Facilities Online Academy: Groundwater Policy and Federal Facilities Overview

Groundwater Policy and Federal Facilities Overview is a two-hour webinar course that provides an overview of U.S Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater policies and guidance with emphasis on cleanups at federal facilities. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Identify EPA groundwater policies;
  • Understand groundwater classification and beneficial use in restoration objectives;
  • Understand nature and extent considerations from groundwater contaminant plumes;
  • Explore applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) commonly associated with groundwater remedies;
  • Identify groundwater considerations for monitored natural attenuation (MNA), institutional controls, and technical impracticability waivers; and,

  • Discover information on major groundwater policies from other federal agencies, such as Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Energy (DoE).

The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture and quizzes. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).

OSC Academy Presents...Stand and Deliver Effective Presentations

This webinar will provide participants with guidelines on how to make better presentations to the public, their peers, or management. The webinar will help to improve your presentation skills and provide you with tools and techniques to be an interesting and effective presenter.

What is in it for you:

  • More polished platform skills.
  • Improved ability to manage content.
  • Greater skill using a variety of training methods.
  • Enhanced ability to create and use visual aids.
  • Ability to manage your audience.

The webinar is intended to help participants increase their comfort in public speaking, control and connect with their audience, handle audience participation, and ultimately deliver the message and take-away points of training courses they are planning to instruct. The webinar will teach participants how to manage nerves, voice, gestures, transitions, visual aids, and content. The webinar also addresses how to manage the audience to include difficult participants, the solicitation of questions, and the response to questions and will include techniques for adapting to diverse audiences.

ProUCL Utilization 2020: Part 1: ProUCL A to Z

ProUCL version 5.1.002 (5.1) is the latest update of the ProUCL statistical software package for analysis of environmental data sets with and without nondetect (ND) observations. The ProUCL software is available at https://www.epa.gov/land-research/proucl-software. In this first installment of a three part ProUCL e-learning seminar series, instructors will present the live interactive use of ProUCL v5.1 from initial data loading, all the way through the major steps of statistical data analysis in ProUCL. General talking points will include

  • Data management
  • DQO based sample size estimation
  • ProUCL options for dealing with non-detects
  • Graphical displays
  • Data based statistical testing
  • UTL/UCL observation and comparison


A modified version of the Iris flower dataset (XLS) will be used as an example throughout the presentation. This dataset is provided here and it is encouraged for attendees to follow along on their local machine.

ProUCL Utilization 2020: Part 2: Trend Analysis

ProUCL version 5.1.002 (5.1) is the latest update of the ProUCL statistical software package for analysis of environmental data sets with and without nondetect (ND) observations. The ProUCL software is available at https://www.epa.gov/land-research/proucl-software. This second installment of the three part ProUCL e-learning seminars will be presenting live interactive use of ProUCL v5.1 focussing specifically on the finer points of regression and trend analysis within the ProUCL software. General discussion points will include

  • Data Management
  • OLS Regression
  • Mann-Kendall Trend Test
  • Theil-Sen Line Test
  • Time Series Analysis

A ProUCL provided trend dataset (XLS) as well as the recon dataset (XLS) will be used as an example throughout the presentation. This datasets are provided here and it is encouraged for attendees to follow along on their local machine.

ProUCL Utilization 2020: Part 3: Background Level Calculations

ProUCL version 5.1.002 (5.1) is the latest update of the ProUCL statistical software package for analysis of environmental data sets with and without nondetect (ND) observations. The ProUCL software is available at https://www.epa.gov/land-research/proucl-software. This final installment of the three part ProUCL e-learning seminar will focus mainly on background dataset analysis and associated background threshold value (BTV) comparisons within the ProUCL software. General discussion points will include

  • Background dataset analysis
  • Appropriate sample size selection
  • UTLs and background threshold values
  • Comparison of BTVs to site data

A ProUCL provided background environmental dataset (XLS) will be used as an example throughout the presentation. This dataset is provided here and it is encouraged for attendees to follow along on their local machine.

Superfund Redevelopment Roundtable Webinar Series: The Brilliant & Profitable Role of Conservation Easements in Superfund Site Redevelopment

Lucrative projects, public benefit and happy communities - land conservation easements can play a brilliant and profitable role in the redevelopment of Superfund sites and brownfield properties. Part of Superfund Redevelopment's roundtable webinar series, this training will focus on opportunities, benefits, strategies, liability protections and risk management for partnerships between developers, local and state governments and land trusts. This interactive session will include robust Q&A as well as an opportunity for participants to share their perspectives on how to encourage more and faster Superfund site redevelopment across the country. Speakers will answer questions about available resources and support, share best practices and update participants on the latest tools and guidance.

Superfund Redevelopment Roundtable Webinar Series: Session 2

The second part of a two-part webinar series for developers and local governments interested in redeveloping Superfund sites and putting them back into productive use.

  • Hear best practices and lessons learned from developers and local governments who have gone through the process.
  • Hear from U.S. EPA, who will answer questions, provide information on available resources and support, and update participants on the latest tools and guidance.
  • Share your thoughts and experiences on how U.S. EPA can better support reuse of sites in your community and across the nation.

Mining Webinar Series: Eagle Mine Superfund Site Case Study

The Eagle Mine Superfund Site near Minturn, Colorado is a prime example of successful EPA and State collaboration overseeing a Potentially Responsible Party conducting cleanup of an abandoned mining and milling complex. Listed on the National Priorities List in 1986, the Site began in 1983 when the State filed for natural resource damages against a PRP pursuant to CERCLA. This case study will present on the Site's technical background, robust remedy, complex regulatory framework and complicated enforcement history. Eagle Mine is a good example of a site nearing completion in the Superfund process; this case study will showcase considerations for a site approaching the finish line.

Items covered will include:

  • Transition from an NPDES permit to a CERCLA Permit Equivalent Document
  • Nexus of CERCLA and Clean Water Act
  • Impacts of an unenforceable Consent Decree
  • Site strategy for completion
Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soil: Considerations for Human Health Risk Assessment

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Risk-based cleanup goals are often calculated assuming that chemicals present in soil are absorbed by humans as efficiently as the chemicals dosed during the toxicity tests used to determine regulatory toxicity values (such as the Reference Dose or Cancer Slope Factor). This assumption can result in inaccurate exposure estimates and associated risks for some contaminated sites because the amount of a chemical absorbed (the chemical's bioavailability) from contaminated soil can be a fraction of the total amount present. Properly accounting for soil-chemical interactions on the bioavailability of chemicals from soil can lead to more accurate estimates of exposures to soil contaminants and improve risk assessments by decreasing uncertainty.
The basis for this training course is the ITRC guidance: Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soil: Considerations for Human Health Risk Assessment (BCS-1). This guidance describes the general concepts of the bioavailability of contaminants in soil, reviews the state of the science, and discusses how to incorporate bioavailability into the human health risk assessment process. This guidance addresses lead, arsenic, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) because evaluating bioavailability is better understood for these chemicals than for others, particularly for the incidental ingestion of soil.
The target audience for this guidance and training course are:
  • Project managers interested in decreasing uncertainty in the risk assessment which may lead to reduced remedial action costs.
  • Risk assessors new to bioavailability or those who want additional confidence and training in the current methods and common practices for using bioavailability assessment to more accurately determine human health risk at a contaminated site.
As a participant in this training you should learn to:
  • Value the ITRC document as a "go-to" resource for soil bioavailability
  • Apply the decision process to determine when a site-specific bioavailability assessment may be appropriate
  • Use the ITRC Review Checklist to develop or review a risk assessment that includes soil bioavailability
  • Consider factors that affect arsenic, lead and PAH bioavailability
  • Select appropriate methods to evaluate soil bioavailability
  • Use tools to develop site-specific soil bioavailability estimates and incorporate them into human health risk assessment
Learners can envision themselves implementing the ITRC guidance through case study applications. Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soil: Considerations for Human Health Risk Assessment (BCS-1) prior to attending the class.

Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Characterization and remediation of contaminated groundwater in fractured rock has not been conducted or studied as broadly as groundwater at unconsolidated porous media sites. This unfamiliarity and lack of experience can make fractured rock sites perplexing. This situation is especially true in portions of the U.S. where bedrock aquifers are a primary source of drinking and process water, and demands on water are increasing. As a result, remedial activities often default to containment of contaminant plumes, point of use treatment and long-term monitoring rather than active reduction of risk. However, this attitude does not incorporate recent advances in the science and technology of fractured rock site characterization and remediation.
The basis for this training course is the ITRC guidance: Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock. The purpose of this guidance is to dispel the belief that fractured rock sites are too complex to characterize and remediate. The physical, chemical and contaminant transport concepts in fractured rock have similarities to unconsolidated porous media, yet there are important differences. These differences are the focus of this guidance.

By participating in this training class, you should learn to:
  • Use ITRC's Fractured Rock Document to guide your decision making so you can:
  • Develop quality Conceptual Site Models (CSMs) for fractured rock sites
  • Set realistic remedial objectives
  • Select the best remedial options
  • Monitor remedial progress and assess results
  • Value an interdisciplinary site team approach to bring collective expertise to improve decision making and to have confidence when going beyond containment and monitoring - - to actually remediating fractured rock sites.
Case studies of successful fractured rock remediation are presented to provide examples of how fractured rock sites can be evaluated and available tools applied to characterization and remediation.
Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock prior to attending the class.

Connecting the Science to Managing LNAPL Sites a 3 Part Series - Part 3

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Connecting the Science to Managing LNAPL Sites - 3-Part Series

The newly updated LNAPLs (Light Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids) 3-part training course series is based on the ITRC guidance: LNAPL Site Management: LCSM Evolution, Decision Process, and Remedial Technologies (LNAPL-3, 2018) and focuses on connecting the science to managing LNAPL sites and helping you:
  • Build upon your Understanding of LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface (Part 1)
  • Develop your LNAPL Conceptual Site Model and LNAPL Remedial Goals (Part 2)
  • Select/Implement LNAPL Technologies (Part 3)
After this training series, the expectation is that you will have the skills and understanding to use ITRC science-based resources to improve decision making at your LNAPL sites. For regulators and other government agency staff, this improved understanding can hopefully be incorporated into your own LNAPL programs.

It is recommended that participants have a general understanding of hydrogeology and some familiarity with petroleum contaminated sites. The courses will build on your existing LNAPL knowledge and outline the framework for making LNAPL remediation and management decisions. It is expected that participants will attend this 3-part training series in sequence.

LNAPL Training Part 1: Understanding LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface
Part 1 teaches how LNAPLs behave in the subsurface and examines what controls their behavior. Part 1:
  • Explains what LNAPL data can tell you about the LNAPL and site conditions
  • Covers how that information is applied to the development of an LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM) (Part 2) and LNAPL technology selection (Part 3)
Relevant and practical examples are used to illustrate key concepts.

LNAPL Training Part 2: LNAPL Conceptual Site Models and the LNAPL Decision Process
Part 2 teaches participants how to develop an LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM) and the overall framework for making LNAPL remediation and management decisions. Part 2:
  • Discusses key LNAPL and site data
  • Explains when and why those data may be important
  • Covers how to effectively organize the data into an LCSM
Part 2 also discusses how to address LNAPL concerns by selecting appropriate goals and objectives, choosing applicable technologies, and assigning remedial performance metrics and endpoints.

LNAPL Training Part 3: Using LNAPL Science, the LCSM, and LNAPL Goals to Select an LNAPL Remedial Technology
Part 3 of the training teaches the importance of informed remedial technology selection and appropriate technology application. Part 3:
  • Discusses remedial technology groups
  • Introduces specific and new remedial technologies
  • Reviews the technology selection process, how technologies can be combined to accelerate cleanup, and how the LCSM informs selection
A case study and examples demonstrate the use of these tools for remedial technology selection, implementation, and demonstration of successful remediation.
Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, LNAPL Site Management: LCSM Evolution, Decision Process, and Remedial Technologies (LNAPL-3, 2018), prior to attending the class.

Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Chemical contaminants in soil and groundwater can volatilize into soil gas and migrate through unsaturated soils of the vadose zone. Vapor intrusion (VI) occurs when these vapors migrate upward into overlying buildings through cracks and gaps in the building floors, foundations, and utility conduits, and contaminate indoor air. If present at sufficiently high concentrations, these vapors may present a threat to the health and safety of building occupants. Petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) is a subset of VI and is the process by which volatile petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) released as vapors from light nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPL), petroleum-contaminated soils, or petroleum-contaminated groundwater migrate through the vadose zone and into overlying buildings. Fortunately, in the case of PHC vapors, this migration is often limited by microorganisms that are normally present in soil. The organisms consume these chemicals, reducing them to nontoxic end products through the process of biodegradation. The extent and rate to which this natural biodegradation process occurs is strongly influenced by the concentration of the vapor source, the distance the vapors must travel through soil from the source to potential receptors, and the presence of oxygen (O2) in the subsurface environment between the source and potential receptors.

The ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance Web-Based Document, Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management (PVI-1, 2014) and this associated Internet-based training provides regulators and practitioners with consensus information based on empirical data and recent research to support PVI decision making under different regulatory frameworks. The PVI assessment strategy described in this guidance document enables confident decision making that protects human health for various types of petroleum sites and multiple PHC compounds. This guidance provides a comprehensive methodology for screening, investigating, and managing potential PVI sites and is intended to promote the efficient use of resources and increase confidence in decision making when evaluating the potential for vapor intrusion at petroleum-contaminated sites. By using the ITRC guidance document, the vapor intrusion pathway can be eliminated from further investigation at many sites where soil or groundwater is contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons or where LNAPL is present.

After attending this ITRC Internet-based training, participants should be able to:
  • Determine when and how to use the ITRC PVI document at their sites
  • Describe the important role of biodegradation impacts on the PVI pathway (in contrast to chlorinated solvent contaminated sites)
  • Value a PVI conceptual site model (CSM) and list its key components
  • Apply the ITRC PVI 8 step decision process to screen sites for the PVI pathway and determine actions to take if a site does not initially screen out, (e.g., site investigation, modeling, and vapor control and site management)
  • Access fact sheets to support community engagement activities at each step in the process
For reference during the training class, participants should have a copy of the flowcharts, Figures 1-2, 3-2, and 4-1 from the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance Web-Based Document, Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management (PVI-1, 2014) and are available as a 3-page PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/PVI/ITRC-PVI-FlowCharts.pdf


ITRC also offers a 2-day PVI focused classroom training at locations across the US. The classroom training provides participants the opportunity to learn more in-depth information about the PVI pathway and practice applying the ITRC PVI guidance document with a diverse group of environmental professionals. Learn more at the ITRC PVI classroom training page.

Remediation Management of Complex Sites

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council At some sites, complex site-specific conditions make it difficult to fully remediate environmental contamination. Both technical and nontechnical challenges can impede remediation and may prevent a site from achieving federal- and state-mandated regulatory cleanup goals within a reasonable time frame. For example, technical challenges may include geologic, hydrogeologic, geochemical, and contaminant-related conditions as well as large-scale or surface conditions. In addition, nontechnical challenges may also play a role such as managing changes that occur over long time frames, overlapping regulatory and financial responsibilities between agencies, setting achievable site objectives, maintaining effective institutional controls, redevelopment and changes in land use, and funding considerations.
This training course and associated ITRC guidance: Remediation Management of Complex Sites (RMCS-1, 2017), provide a recommended holistic process for management of challenging sites, termed "adaptive site management." This process is a comprehensive, flexible, and iterative process that is well-suited for sites where there is significant uncertainty in remedy performance predictions. Adaptive site management includes the establishment of interim objectives and long-term site objectives that consider both technical and nontechnical challenges. Periodic adjustment of the remedial approach may involve multiple technologies at any one time and changes in technologies over time. Comprehensive planning and scheduled evaluations of remedy performance help decision makers track remedy progress and improve the timeliness of remedy optimization, reevaluations, or transition to other technologies/contingency actions.
By participating in this training course we expect you will learn to apply the ITRC guidance document to:
  • Identify and integrate technical and nontechnical challenges into a holistic approach to remediation
  • Use the Remediation Potential Assessment to identify whether adaptive site management is warranted due to site complexity
  • Understand and apply adaptive site management principles
  • Develop a long-term performance-based action plan
  • Apply well-demonstrated techniques for effective stakeholder engagement
  • Access additional resources, tools, and case studies most relevant for complex sites
  • Communicate the value of the guidance to regulators, practitioners, community members, and others
Ultimately, using the guidance that can lead to better decision making and remediation management at complex sites. The guidance is intended to benefit a variety of site decision makers, including regulators, responsible parties and their consultants, and public and tribal stakeholders.
Case studies are used to describe real-world applications of remediation and remediation management at complex sites. Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance Remediation Management of Complex Sites (RMCS-1, 2017) prior to attending the class.