U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

Technology Innovation News Survey

Entries for July 16-31, 2019

Market/Commercialization Information
DECOMMISSIONING AND DISPOSAL ACTIVITIES FOR THE SM-1 REACTOR FACILITY, FORT BELVOIR, VA
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, USACE District, Baltimore, MD.
Federal Business Opportunities, Solicitation W912DR18R0021, 2019

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Baltimore District has a requirement for a remediation contractor to support decommissioning and disposal activities for the SM-1 reactor facility located at Fort Belvoir, Virginia, on the western shore of the Potomac River. The work will encompass a broad range of planning, engineering design, construction, demolition, and support activities related to the decommissioning and disposal of the deactivated SM-1 nuclear power plant and reactor facilities. The NAICS code is 562910. A detailed work statement is attached to the FedBizOpps notice. Decommissioning and reporting work must be completed by September 30, 2026. Offers are due by 11:00 AM ET on November 4, 2019. https://www.fbo.gov/spg/USA/COE/DACA31/W912DR18R0021/listing.html


MECHANISM FOR TIME-SENSITIVE RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES IN ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES
DHHS, National Institutes of Health, Funding Opportunity RFA-ES-19-011, 2019

This funding opportunity is intended to support novel environmental health research in which an unpredictable event or policy change provides a limited window of opportunity to collect human biological samples or environmental exposure data. The primary motivation is to understand the consequences of natural and human-made disasters, emerging environmental public health threats, and policy changes in the U.S. and abroad. A distinguishing feature of an appropriate study is the need for rapid review and funding, substantially shorter than the typical NIH grant review/award cycle, for the research question to be addressed and swiftly implemented. See additional details at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-ES-19-011.html. The closing date for applications is October 3, 2022. http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=318986


CONTAMINATED SITES, NATURAL DISASTERS, CHANGING ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS & VULNERABLE COMMUNITIES: RESEARCH TO BUILD RESILIENCE
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Funding Opportunity EPA-G2019-STAR-E1, 2019

EPA's Science to Achieve Results (STAR) program is asking the scientific community to propose transdisciplinary research with an approach that integrates the following research questions: (1) How may certain natural disasters (e.g., wildfires, severe storms, flooding, hurricanes, tornadoes, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes or tsunamis) or changing environmental conditions (e.g., rising sea levels, higher average temperature or heat index) cause specific chemical contaminants to migrate from certain contaminated or containment sites (e.g., hazardous waste sites, landfills, solid waste or wastewater storage or treatment facilities, industrial sites such as mines or refineries) to nearby communities and pose elevated exposure risks to vulnerable groups, especially the elderly and/or children under the age of five years? (2) What are the major contributing factors or effect modifiers (in addition to the contaminants and natural disasters or changing environmental conditions) that might exacerbate the impacts to these vulnerable groups in impacted communities? (3) How can scientific research results specifically help communities build better resilience against the problems and issues identified above? This RFA is supported by EPA's Sustainable and Healthy Communities Program. Up to 5 awards are anticipated out of an estimated total program funding of $4M. Closing date for applications is September 17, 2019. http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=318927 More information: https://www.epa.gov/research-grants/contaminated-sites-natural-disasters-changing-environmental-conditions-and.


CBFO TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE CONTRACT - REQUEST FOR INFORMATION (RFI)
Department of Energy, EM Consolidated Business Center, Cincinnati, OH
Federal Business Opportunities, Solicitation 89303319NEM000022, 2019

DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) is planning a new Technical Assistance Contract to perform support services on behalf of DOE-EM's Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) in southeastern New Mexico. This RFI/Sources Sought solicits input from interested parties with the specialized capabilities necessary to perform all or part of the requirements. The CBFO requires a contractor to provide expert technical advice and assistance in the following areas: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance; chemical compatibility and acceptable knowledge; audits and assessments; security; program management; WIPP site operations; environmental and regulatory compliance; nuclear and industrial safety; scientific and international programs; transuranic (TRU) waste characterization and certification; TRU waste transportation and packaging; general business operations; information technology; document control; and executive management support. Responses to the details found in the attachment to the FedBizOpps notice will assist DOE with identifying interested and capable sources for developing its acquisition strategy. Capability statements must be submitted via email by 7:30 AM ET on Monday, September 16, 2019. https://www.fbo.gov/spg/DOE/PAM/HQ/89303319NEM000022/listing.html


US EPA REGION 8, SUPERFUND TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT & RESPONSE TEAM
Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Acquisition Solutions, Region VIII, Denver, CO.
Federal Business Opportunities, Solicitation 68HE0819R0014, 2019

U.S. EPA Region 8 anticipates issuing a full and open competition RFP for the Superfund Technical Assessment and Response Team V after August 2019 for emergency response, removal, site assessment, training, data management, and related technical and administrative services. Monitor FedConnect for updates at https://www.fedconnect.net/FedConnect/?doc=68HE0819R0014&agency=EPA. The contractor will support response and site assessment activities related to the release or threat of release of oil, petroleum products, hazardous substances, weapons of mass destruction, or pollutants and contaminants that pose an actual or potential threat to human health and welfare or to the environment. Region 8 intends to award one fixed-rate IDIQ contract for a one-year base period of performance with six one-year option periods. Work will be ordered through the issuance of task orders. The NAICS code for this procurement is 541620 (Environmental Consulting Services), size standard $15M. https://www.fbo.gov/spg/EPA/OAM/8TMS-G/68HE0819R0014/listing.html



Cleanup News
TREES CAN DO THE DIRTY WORK OF WASTE CLEANUP
Banegas, D. | USDA Forest Service Blog, 2019

With the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, the Forest Service works in partnership with cities, counties, and corporations to install phytoremediation sites. The initiative is in its fourth year of annual funding, and altogether, about 20,000 trees have been planted at 16 phytoremediation sites in the Lake Michigan and Lake Superior watersheds. The trees are mostly fast-growing willows and poplars, which are ideal for phytoremediation because they grow quickly and have deep and extensive root systems. https://www.usda.gov/media/blog/2019/08/30/trees-can-do-dirty-work-waste-cleanup

STATE SUPERFUND SITE RECLASSIFICATION NOTICE: CLASS 02 TO CLASS 04
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC), 2 pp, 2019

The Jackson Steel manufacturing plant, located in the Village of Mineola, New York, has been officially downgraded from a Class 02 to a Class 04, meaning the vacant U.S. EPA Superfund site is no longer a significant threat to the public's health or the environment. Manufacturing of roll-form metal shapes was conducted at the facility 1970-1991, where spills of degreasers, including PCE, TCE, and 1,1,1-TCA, at the waste storage area contributed to contamination of the soil and groundwater. The site-wide remedy implemented at Jackson Steel included excavation of contaminated soil, installation, and operation of a soil vapor extraction system and groundwater treatment via in situ chemical oxidation. Any remaining contamination will be addressed under the site management plan, which consists of a vapor intrusion management plan and institutional control implementation and assurance plan. http://www.dec.ny.gov/data/der/factsheet/130095reclass.pdf See additional details in the EPA site closeout report at https://semspub.epa.gov/work/02/436119.pdf.


Demonstrations / Feasibility Studies
A RIGOROUS DEMONSTRATION OF PERMEABILITY ENHANCEMENT TECHNOLOGY FOR IN SITU REMEDIATION OF LOW PERMEABILITY MEDIA
Sorenson, K., D. Nguyen, R. Wymore, and N. Smith.
ESTCP Project ER-201430, 651 pp, 2019

A hybrid pneumatic permeability enhancement technology was pilot tested to facilitate amendment delivery and distribution at 3 sites with low-permeability lithologies: Marine Corps Base-Camp Pendleton (MCB-CP), Lake City Army Ammunition Plant (LCAAP) Site 17D, and the Grand Forks Air Force Base (GFAFB) site TU594. The overall objective was to compare the performance and cost benefits of hydraulic and hybrid pneumatic permeability enhancement for in situ treatment at low-permeability sites. Advanced geophysics monitoring tools evaluated the vertical and horizontal extent of amendment distribution, and measurements were validated by conventional soil confirmation and groundwater performance monitoring. The technology achieved 99-100% of the target injection within the treatment areas at MCB-CP and GFAFB, and 70% at LCAAP despite challenging subsurface conditions. A cost comparison exercise indicated that permeability enhancement techniques can be more or significantly more competitive than conventional injection techniques. https://www.serdp-estcp.org/content/download/49513/472045/file/ER-201430%20Final%20Report.pdf


EFFECTIVENESS OF COLLOIDAL ACTIVATED CARBON AS AN IN SITU TREATMENT TO MITIGATE PFAS
Wilson, S., K. Thoreson, and P. Lyman. | The PFAS Management, Mitigation, and Remediation Conference, 19-20 June, Westerville, Ohio, 2019, abstract only

The Michigan Department of Military and Veteran Affairs (DMVA) have been remediating chlorinated solvents in groundwater from historical operations at the Grayling Army Airfield facility since the 1990s. In 2016, the DMVA found PFAS commingled with a PCE plume that was migrating toward the property boundary. The DMVA pilot tested an in situ reactive barrier application of colloidal activated carbon, selected because of the expected rapid reductions of PFAS by removal from the dissolved mobile phase and its cost-effectiveness. After 170 days, PFAS concentrations were reduced from >80 ng/L to <5 ng/L and PCE concentrations were reduced from >5 µg/L to <2 µg /L in downgradient wells. See project slides by P. Lyman and R. Moore: https://static1.squarespace.com/static/584f2c26197aea4b23515113/t/5d02977d06eb890001234fd7/1560450952039/AIPG-Regenesis-MVA-final.pdf Also see https://www.michigan.gov/pfasresponse/0,9038,7-365-86511_82704_84187---,00.html


FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF SOLAR-POWERED ELECTROCOAGULATION WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM FOR PURIFYING GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATED BY BOTH TOTAL COLIFORMS AND ARSENIC
Oh, C., S. Pak, Y.-S. Han, N.T.H. Ha, M. Hong, and S. Ji.
Environmental Technology [Published online 19 June prior to print]

An electrocoagulation reactor water treatment system using Fe electrodes and a filtration tank was designed to treat complex coliform and As-contaminated groundwater near the Red River in Vietnam. The water treatment system reduced 10.3 CFU/mL of total coliform and 376 µg/L of As(III) in the groundwater to 0 CFU/mL and 6.68 µg/L, respectively. Total coliforms were attenuated by Fe(II) infiltration or enmeshed during Fe precipitate formation. Of the total As, 43% formed As(III) complexation with the Fe precipitates and the other 57% was oxidized to As(V) and then adsorbed to Fe precipitates. The Fe precipitates that contained coliforms and As were separated from the discharge water in the filtration tank. The system required 49 W of power to operate, or 423 kWh/year, to continuously purify 0.5 t water/day. This requirement was powered by a 380-750 W solar panel, without external energy supply.


HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES
Korak, J., A. Kennedy, and M. Arias-Paic.
U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Research and Development Office, Final Report ST-2018-9085-01, 105 pp, 2018

The Bureau of Reclamation partnered with two water districts, one in California and one in Oklahoma, to improve treatment process efficiency and reduce the cost for Cr(VI) removal in groundwater used as drinking water, with a treatment goal of 10 µg/L. In California, a pilot-scale strong-base ion exchange (SBA) process was installed at one of the system points of entry. Columns with SBA resin were loaded until exhausted for Cr and then were returned to the Bureau for regeneration and waste minimization process development. A pilot-scale study of stannous chloride reduction-coagulation-filtration was conducted at two wells in California and one well in Oklahoma. All results from this project were published in peer-reviewed journals, and each of the three chapters is a stand-alone study and a reprint of the published article.https://www.usbr.gov/research/projects/download_product.cfm?id=2746.


PFAS SUMMARY
Horsham Water & Sewer Authority, April 2019

Since July 2014, the Horsham Water and Sewer Authority (HWSA) has been responding to the discovery of PFOS and PFOA in local groundwater, sourced from the nearby Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base Willow Grove. In June 2016, HWSA shut down a total of 5 wells exceeding the May 2016 EPA health standard of 70 ng/L and set a goal of reducing PFOA and PFOS to non-detect (ND) level in all drinking water supplied. HSA began installing granular activated carbon (GAC) filters to remediate and return the 5 impacted wells to service. A pilot test evaluated the effectiveness of a newly developed PFAS-selective ion exchange resin placed downstream of the GAC filters on 1 well as a polishing step to obtain ND levels. After several months of operation, the GAC filters were bypassed and the resin continued to operate until the concentration of PFAS rose above the detection level. Upon full transition to a long-term plan by fall 2019, the public water supply will be sourced by 10 wells with PFAS removal filters installed, purchased water from a supplier with a PFAS removal filter installed, and purchased water from a second supplier that has PFAS at or around non-detect levels. https://www.horshamwater-sewer.com/pfas-summary More information https://www.wateronline.com/doc/polishing-pfas-to-non-detect-levels-using-pfas-selective-resin-0001 and https://www.wateronline.com/doc/pilot-study-ion-exchange-and-gac-to-reduce-pfas-to-non-detect-0001



Research
A GIS SOLUTION TO EVALUATING REMEDIAL ALTERNATIVES IN SEDIMENT REMEDIATION AND RECOVERY
Delwiche, L.M. | 2018 Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference, 4-6 April, Seattle, Washington, 16 slides, 2018

A GIS-based sediment remediation/recovery model was designed using ESRI ArcGIS Model Builder that incorporates the SEDCAM sediment attenuation model and analytical results derived from field samples to produce various cleanup scenarios. These scenarios were then further evaluated as remedial alternatives. On a chemical-by-chemical basis, the model determined active remediation footprints required to meet sediment cleanup levels at the end of a defined natural recovery period. Post-remediation natural recovery was incorporated through site-specific parameters such as sedimentation rate, watershed loading chemical concentrations, and the depth of the biologically active zone. The model can also be used to test the site-specific sensitivity to model input parameters. Such information can potentially identify data gaps required for the accurate prediction of future sediment conditions. https://cedar.wwu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2480&context=ssec


PASSIVE SAMPLING OF PFAS: TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATIONS TO SITE AND RISK ASSESSMENT
Kaltenberg, E., K. Dasu, F. Pala, S. Marconetto, B. McDonald, and A. Dindal.
2019 Real Property Institute of Canada (RPIC) Federal Contaminated Sites Regional Workshop, 4-5 June, Halifax, Nova Scotia, 20 slides, 2019

This study aimed to develop passive samplers to detect PFAS in the field. Preliminary tests identified a suitable medium, which was then run through a series of adsorption experiments for 15 PFAS analytes. Equilibrium was achieved in <7 days for most of the analytes. Observed adsorption behavior varied significantly between the analytes, with longer chain compounds and sulfonates demonstrating higher sorption than shorter chains analytes and carboxylates. Sorption of PFAS onto the passive sampler was also affected by the water pH, ionic strength, and dissolved organic matter. The passive samplers will be field-tested on two Canadian sites with historical PFAS contamination in both groundwater and surface water. The presentation included a discussion of benefits, limitations, and future refinement needs of the technology and its applicability in site investigation and risk assessment. http://rpic-ibic.ca/images/2019_FCSRW/presentations/Passive_Sampling_of_PFAS-_Technology_Development_and_Applications_to_Site_and_Risk_Management_.pdf Longer abstract available by clicking on Stream 4a at http://rpic-ibic.ca/en/events/2019-federal-contaminated-sites-fcs-regional-workshops/2019-rpic-fcs-regional-workshop/2019-rpic-fcs-regional-workshop-oral-abstracts/2019-rpic-fcs-regional-workshop-stream-4a-innovation-research-and-development-pfas-assessment


INNOVATIVE TREATMENT OF WOOD WASTE IMPACTED SEDIMENTS USING REACTIVE AMENDMENTS AND DGT PASSIVE POREWATER SULPHIDE TESTING TECHNIQUES
Berlin, D., D. Vlassopoulos, M. Kanematsu, J. Dunay, E. Malczyk, and T. Wang.
2019 Real Property Institute of Canada (RPIC) Federal Contaminated Sites Regional Workshop, 4-5 June, Halifax, Nova Scotia. 20 slides, 2019

Public Services and Procurement Canada is conducting risk management studies on sediments within Esquimalt Harbour that contain wood waste deposits from historical activities. Innovative passive porewater samplers using a diffusive-gradient-in-thin-films (DGT) method were deployed for 30 min-24 hrs to quickly and accurately measure porewater sulfide concentrations. Measured concentrations ranged from <1 mg/L to >200 mg/L. An innovative bench-scale testing program was conducted to assess the effectiveness of sand cover mixed with a range of treatment amendments to reduce bioavailable porewater sulfide concentrations in sediments containing wood wastes. Treatment amendments included mineral-based materials such as iron oxides, manganese oxides, and iron carbonates. Vertical profiles of redox zonation and porewater sulfide were measured with DGTs in the amended cover and underlying wood waste sediments to assess the effectiveness of the reactive amendments. The results are being used to design an in situ field pilot study. http://rpic-ibic.ca/images/2019_FCSRW/presentations/Innovative_Treatment_of_Wood_Waste_Impacted_Sediments_Using_Reactive_Amendments_and_DGT_Passive_Porewater_Sulphide_Testing_Techniques.pdf Longer abstract available by clicking on Stream 6d at http://rpic-ibic.ca/en/events/2019-federal-contaminated-sites-fcs-regional-workshops/2019-rpic-fcs-regional-workshop/2019-rpic-fcs-regional-workshop-oral-abstracts/2019-rpic-fcs-regional-workshop-stream-4a-innovation-research-and-development-pfas-assessment.


BIODEGRADATION OF 1,4-DIOXANE IN CO-CONTAMINANT MIXTURES
Zhang, S., Master's Thesis, University of California Los Angeles, 109 pp, 2017

This research aimed to measure and model the effects of chlorinated solvents on 1,4-dioxane metabolic biodegradation, elucidate the mechanisms of the inhibition, and test the effects of mixtures of co-contaminants in samples collected from actual 1,4-dioxane contaminated sites. Individual solvents inhibited biodegradation of 1,4-dioxane in the following order: 1,1-DCE >cDCE >TCE>TCA. Genes for catalytic enzymes, dioxane monooxygenase (dxmB) and alcohol dehydrogenase (aldH) were reduced in the presence of chlorinated solvents. Results are useful to understand the fundamentals of enzymatic processes that catalyze biological degradation of hazardous compounds and provide quantitative data for the development of in situ bioremediation approaches for contaminant mixtures. https://escholarship.org/content/qt1526m401/qt1526m401.pdf?t=oq1src


ARSENIC RELEASE AND ATTENUATION PROCESSES IN A GROUNDWATER AQUIFER DURING ANAEROBIC REMEDIATION OF TCE WITH BIOSTIMULATION
Smith, S., R.R. Dupont, and J.E. McLean.
Groundwater Monitoring & Remediation 39(3):61-70(2019)

Lab tests were conducted to measure the amount of naturally occurring As released as a result of anthropogenic inputs of carbon used for TCE remediation. Large laboratory columns packed with TCE-contaminated aquifer solids from a site near Hill Air Force Base were fed with TCE-contaminated groundwater and biostimulated, bioaugmented, and monitored over 7.5 years. Columns were fed with either whey or 2 formulations of Newman Zone® emulsified oil, and a no-carbon addition control, to evaluate the biogeochemical changes that affect As solubilization. Columns were analyzed in 10.16-cm sections for pore water and sediment quality parameters. The whey treatment resulted in 52.9% of the total As in the solids leaching from the columns. The oil treatments promoted loss of 20.9% of the total As. Arsenic solubility was associated with strongly reducing conditions developed with whey addition, leading to the dissolution of crystalline Fe oxides and release of As. Arsenic was attenuated within the oil-treated columns and was associated with carbonates in the lower layers. A consequence of adding whey, resulting in the desired full dechlorination of TCE in this aquifer, is the mobilization of As in groundwater.


MODIFIED CLAY AS AN EFFECTIVE SOIL AMENDMENT TO REDUCE LEACHING OF CATIONIC, ANIONIC AND NEUTRAL PFAS FROM CONTAMINATED SANDY SOILS
Wang, C., B. Yan, and J. Liu.
2019 Real Property Institute of Canada (RPIC) Federal Contaminated Sites Regional Workshop, 4-5 June, Halifax, Nova Scotia. 26 slides, 2019

Modified clays were evaluated as a soil amendment to reduce PFAS mobility and/or leachability in contaminated soils. PFAS-contaminated sandy soils were characterized for the presence of anionic, cationic and neutral PFAS. A modified batch test determined the effect of sorbent dosage, equilibration time, and potential microbial activities using heavily contaminated soil. A significant reduction (95~99%) of anionic PFAS from the soil leachate, including PFOS, PFHxS, and PFOA, was achieved in 1-3 days with a dosage as low as 0.5% wet weight. Reduction of several cationic and neutral PFAS was observed with a higher dose of clay. The presentation covers a comparative assessment conducted between the modified clay, natural clay, granular activated carbon, and biochar. Future testing involves assessing the modified clay's performance using a long-term unsaturated soil setup to simulate field conditions. http://rpic-ibic.ca/images/2019_FCSRW/presentations/Modified_Clay_as_an_Effective_Soil_Amendment_to_Reduce_Leaching_of_Cationic_Anionic_and_Neutral_PFAS_from_Contaminated_Sandy_Soils_.pdf Longer abstract available by clicking on Stream 4a at http://rpic-ibic.ca/en/events/2019-federal-contaminated-sites-fcs-regional-workshops/2019-rpic-fcs-regional-workshop/2019-rpic-fcs-regional-workshop-oral-abstracts/2019-rpic-fcs-regional-workshop-stream-4a-innovation-research-and-development-pfas-assessment


ASSESSMENT OF PUMP-AND-TREAT SYSTEM IMPACTS ON 200 WEST AQUIFER CONDITIONS: INTERIM STATUS REPORT
Demirkanli, D.I., N.P. Qafoku, D.L. Saunders, A.R. Lawter, M.M. Snyder, C. Bagwell, et al.
PNNL-28063, 107 pp, 2018

The 200 West Area pump-and-treat (P&T) system is a key component of the final remedy selected for the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit (OU), and the interim remedial action selected for the 200-UP-1 OU at the Hanford Site. The facility also receives perched water, groundwater, and leachate from several other contaminated areas within the Hanford Site. Since the use of the P&T system evolved to support remediation activities in other OUs, a study was conducted to determine impacts on the 200 West aquifer where the treated water is injected. A baseline assessment using 20 samples from 3 injection wells measured important parameters such as particle size distribution, moisture content, mineral phase abundancies, pH, extractable elements and contaminants, carbon content, and bacterial types and abundance. Batch experiments were conducted using P&T effluent and representative Hanover groundwater to measure potential geochemical reactions occurring in the aquifer with the injection of P&T effluent. Planned future testing includes column experiments and reactive transport modeling to quantitatively assess aquifer impacts and system performance under the current and predicted future conditions. https://www.pnnl.gov/main/publications/external/technical_reports/PNNL-28063.pdf



General News
PFAS AND OTHER EMERGING CONTAMINANTS CONFERENCE
American Council of Engineering Companies and Ground Water Professionals of North Carolina, 23-24 April, Raleigh, NC, 2019

The 2-day workshop featured presentations on PFAS chemistry, occurrence, fate, remediation, toxicology, and risk assessment and communication as well as emerging contaminants, including 1,4-dioxane. See day 1 presentations at http://gwpnc.org/PFAS_Day1_Conference_Presentations.pdf. See day 2 presentations at http://gwpnc.org/PFAS_Day2_Conference_Presentations.pdf.


GREEN REMEDIATION BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES: SITES WITH LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS
U.S. EPA Office of Land and Emergency Management, EPA 542-F-19-001, 4 pp, 2019

This fact sheet covers the concepts and tools for using best management practices to reduce the environmental footprint of activities associated with assessing and remediating contaminated sites. https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2019-08/documents/ust_gr_fact_sheet.pdf


PERFLUOROALKYL AND POLYFLUOROALKYL SUBSTANCES (PFAS) METHODS AND GUIDANCE FOR SAMPLING AND ANALYZING WATER AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL MEDIA
U.S. EPA Technical Brief, EPA 600-F-17-022f, 2 pp, 2019

EPA is working to develop and validate analytical methods for PFAS chemicals in groundwater, surface water, wastewater, and solids, including soils, sediments, and biosolids. This updated fact sheet summarizes progress made in this effort since 2017.https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2019-02/documents/pfas_methods_tech_brief_28feb19_update.pdf


GEOPHYSICAL METHODS FOR CHARACTERIZATION AND MONITORING AT GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION SITES
Naval Facilities Engineering Command, 8 pp, 2018

Geophysical methods have the potential to improve characterization and monitoring at sites where groundwater remediation is planned or underway. This fact sheet focuses on the application of geophysical tools in support of environmental remediation. The following topics are discussed: Why use geophysics? What geophysical methods are available? When/where do different geophysical methods work? https://www.navfac.navy.mil/content/dam/navfac/Specialty%20Centers/Engineering%20and%20Expeditionary%20Warfare%20Center/Environmental/Restoration/er_pdfs/g/navfacexwc-ev-geophysical-groundwater-201808.pdf


ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS OF ELECTROCHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY. WHAT IS NEEDED TO ENABLE FULL-SCALE APPLICATIONS?
Lacasa, E., S. Cotillas, C. Saez, J. Lobato, P. Canizares, and M.A. Rodrigo.
Current Opinion in Electrochemistry 1:149-156(2019)

A short review is provided that includes a brief description of the current state of electrochemical technologies at a low technology readiness level, highlighting barriers that must be removed to achieve full-scale applications in industry.


RECENT ADVANCES IN HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM REMOVAL FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY ADSORPTIVE METHODS
Pakade, V.E., N.T. Tavengwa, and L.M. Madikizel.
RCS Advances 9:26142(2019)

Recent advances, insights, and project future directions for adsorbents used for Cr(VI) removal are summarized in this article. It also compares and contrasts the performances achieved by natural adsorbents and their variants. https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlepdf/2019/ra/c9ra05188k


1,4-DIOXANE AS AN EMERGING WATER CONTAMINANT: STATE OF THE SCIENCE AND EVALUATION OF RESEARCH NEEDS
Pollitt, K.J.G., J.-H. Kim, J. Peccia, M. Elimelech, Y. Zhanga, G. Charkoftaki, B. Hodges, et al.
Science of the Total Environment 690: 853-866(2019)

This review highlights the current state of knowledge, key uncertainties, and data needs for future research on 1,4-dioxane.


ADVANCED NANOSTRUCTURED MATERIALS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION
Naushad, M., S. Rajendran, and F. Gracia (eds), Springer International Publishing, ISBN: 978-3-030-04477-0, ISBN: 978-3-030-04476-3, 391 pp, 2019

Within 13 chapters, this book provides a wide-ranging exploration of ongoing research and developmental events in environmental nanotechnology. Included are experimental studies of various nanomaterials along with their design and applications, with specific attention to chemical reactions and their challenges for catalytic systems. View the table of contents and abstracts at https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783030044763?wt_mc=ThirdParty.SpringerLink.3.EPR653.About_eBook#otherversion=9783030044770


INTEGRATED ELECTROKINETIC PROCESSES FOR THE REMEDIATION OF PHTHALATE ESTERS IN RIVER SEDIMENTS: A MINI-REVIEW
Yang, G.C.C. | Science of the Total Environment 659:963-972(2019)

This mini-review introduces 4 recently reported novel integrated electrokinetic (EK) processes for the remediation of phthalate ester contamination in river sediments: the EK/advanced oxidation process and EK/biological process. The article provides a comprehensive summary of these remediation processes including test results and key findings.


IN SITU REMEDIATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINATION: OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY AND ADVANCED MATERIALS
Zhang, T. G.V. Lowry, N.L. Capiro, J. Chen, W. Chen, Y. Chen, D.D. Dionysiou, et al.
Environmental Science: Nano 6:1283-1302(2019)

Opportunities for nanotechnology-enabled in situ remediation technologies to address soil and groundwater contamination are discussed in this publication. The discussion covers candidate nanomaterials, applications of nanomaterials to complement existing remediation approaches and address emerging contaminants, as well as the potential barriers for implementation and strategies and research needs to overcome these barriers.


THE OCCURRENCE AND FATE OF PER- AND POLY-FLUOROALKYL SUBSTANCES (PFAS) IN THE ENVIRONMENT
Brusseau, M.L., University of Arizona, 20 February, Tuczon, Arizona, 50 slides, 2019

This presentation discusses the nature, sources, and properties of PFAS, as well as their transport and fate in the environment. The presentation includes case studies. https://wrrc.arizona.edu/sites/wrrc.arizona.edu/files/PFAS%20Seminar_Feb%202019_Brusseau.pdf


SUSTAINABLE REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Hou, D (ed)., Butterworth-Heinemann Publishing, ISBN 9780128179826, 352 pp, 2019

Within 17 chapters, this book integrates green materials, cleaner processes, and sustainability assessment methods for planning, designing and implementing a more effective remediation process in soil and groundwater projects. The book discusses greener remediation materials that render a smaller environmental footprint, cleaner processes that minimize secondary environmental impact, and sustainability assessment methods that can be used to guide the development of materials and processes. Key features include addressing materials, processes, and assessment needs for implementing a successful sustainable remediation process; providing an integrated approach for the unitization of various green technologies, such as green materials, cleaner processes and sustainability assessment; and case studies based on full-scale commercial soil and groundwater remediation projects. View the table of contents at https://www.elsevier.com/books/sustainable-remediation-of-contaminated-soil-and-groundwater/hou/978-0-12-817982-6.



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