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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

Technology Innovation News Survey

Entries for July 16-31, 2022

Market/Commercialization Information
SUPERFUND GREAT LAKES A&E SERVICES
Contract Opportunities at SAM.gov, Solicitation 68HE0522R0024, 2022
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 5 Contracting Office, Chicago, IL

This is a full and open competition under NAICS code 562910. EPA Region 5 seeks a contractor that can support remedial response that includes but is not limited to: contaminated sediment evaluation, Remedial Investigation, Feasibility Study, remedial design activities, habitat restoration design/evaluation support, and contaminated sediment remedial oversight under the following authorities: Great Lakes Legacy Reauthorization Act (GLLRA) of 2008; CERCLA as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) and the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act pursuant to the Federal Response Plan and other laws to help address and/or mitigate endangerment to the public health, welfare, or environment, and to support States and communities in preparing for responses to releases of hazardous substances, as well as counter-terrorism. Contract services include performance of site management; remedial investigation and feasibility studies; habitat evaluation and restoration plans; engineering services to design remedial actions; and engineering services in overseeing construction; engineering evaluation; remedial investigations/feasibility studies; remedial design; Non-time critical removal actions; enforcement support; long term response actions and other technical assistance, including community involvement, sampling and analysis support, risk assessment, effectiveness monitoring, and pre-design investigation. Services may include technical and project management services supporting EPA's coordination and oversight of EPA remedial activities where they are performed by a State, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, or the Agency's non-federal sponsor specifically under the GLLRA. EPA anticipates awarding ~2 Indefinite Delivery-Indefinite Quantity single award contracts with a maximum contract value of $450,000,000 and an ordering period of 5 years. The SFGLAES suite of contracts will result in a combined $450M shared capacity amongst all awardees. The guaranteed minimum value of this requirement is $100,000 per contract. Each individual Task Order shall be separately negotiated based on the A-E effort involved. Task Orders will be issued as firm fixed price and/or time and materials. In no event will the value of the total task orders issued under this contract exceed the maximum contract value. Standard Form 330s are due 5:00 PM CDT on September 16, 2022. https://sam.gov/opp/c497d15efb954730851435434290c2f6/view


OPTIMIZED REMEDIATION CONTRACT AT ARNOLD AIR FORCE BASE, TN -- SOURCES SOUGHT - QUESTION & ANSWER
Contract Opportunities at SAM.gov, Solicitation FA8903-22-RFI-ORC_ARNOLD_AFB, 2022
U.S. Department of the Air Force, Air Force Installation and Mission Support Center, Joint Base San Antonio, Lackland, TX

This is a sources sought notice for marketing purposes only under NAICS code FA8903-22-RFI-ORC_ARNOLD_AFB. The U.S. Department of the Air Force seeks to identify qualified small businesses interested in performing environmental remediation activities at Arnold Air Force Base in south-central Tennessee near Manchester. It consists of 3,600 acres of active test facility, 6,553 acres of Tennessee Air National Guard training facility, and 6,000 acres of wildlife management area managed by the state. The scope of this anticipated contract is to perform environmental restoration services, including, but not limited to, developing a Project Management Plan and Quality Assurance Surveillance Plan; performance of Long-term Monitoring and Remedial Actions; and operations and maintenance of all remediation equipment. The contractor shall present results in one Technical Memo/Report per installation documenting the analytical methods and maps depicting sampling locations within the trichloroethene (TCE) plume and sample analysis results. Management and disposal of waste media associated with PFOS/PFOA shall be conducted in accordance with the "AF Guidance Memorandum Establishing Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF)-Related Waste Management Implementation Guidance" dated September 5, 2019. The contractor must ensure that remedial actions do not negatively impact the distribution of any other contaminants and/or emerging contaminants, such as PFOA, PFOS, and 1,4-dioxane. Capability statements are due by 4:00 PM CDT on September 8, 2022. https://sam.gov/opp/2a6fcb9613f54aaf905d90578aae7195/view


OPTIMIZED REMEDIATION CONTRACT AT MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, AL - SOURCES SOUGHT - QUESTION & ANSWER
Contract Opportunities at SAM.gov, Solicitation FA8903-22-RFI-ORC_MAXWELL_AFB, 2022
U.S. Department of the Air Force, Air Force Installation and Mission Support Center, Joint Base San Antonio, Lackland, TX

This is a sources sought notice for marketing purposes only under NAICS code 562910. The U.S. Department of the Air Force seeks to identify qualified small businesses interested in performing environmental remediation activities at Maxwell AFB in Alabama. The activities include maintenance of established remedies, optimization at applicable sites, and achieving site-specific objectives. The Contractor shall undertake Environmental Remediation activities to achieve Performance Objectives (POs) at eight (8) Installation Restoration Program (IRP) sites and two (2) Military Munitions Response Program (MMRP) sites. The scope of this anticipated contract is to perform environmental restoration services, including, but not limited to, developing a Project Management Plan and Quality Assurance Surveillance Plan; performance of Long-term Monitoring and Remedial Actions; and operations and maintenance of all remediation equipment. The contractor shall present results in one Technical Memo/Report per installation documenting the analytical methods and maps depicting sampling locations within the trichloroethene (TCE) plume and sample analysis results. Management and disposal of waste media associated with PFOS/PFOA shall be conducted in accordance with the "AF Guidance Memorandum Establishing Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF)-Related Waste Management Implementation Guidance" dated September 5, 2019. The contractor must ensure that remedial actions do not negatively impact the distribution of any other contaminants and/or emerging contaminants, such as PFOA, PFOS, and 1,4-dioxane. Capability statements are due by 4:00 PM CDT on September 8, 2022. https://sam.gov/opp/9e05bd2a9336412d892f0f612e01c04c/view



Cleanup News
FULL-SCALE APPLICATION OF EHC® LIQUID TECHNOLOGY FOR THE ISCR AND ERD TREATMENT OF AN AQUIFER CONTAMINATED WITH TETRACHLOROMETHANE AND CHLOROFORM
Mueller, M., F. Lakhwala, and D. Leigh. Twelfth International Conference on the Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds, 22-26 May, abstract only, 2022

Anaerobic remediation of an aquifer historically contaminated with tetrachloromethane and chloroform was successfully performed in Italy using EHC® Liquid reagent. EHC is an engineered slow-release compound of electrolyte donors in the subsurface. Less than 12 months after completing the injection phase in the saturated zone, a rapid decrease in the concentrations of carbon tetrachloride (CT) and chloroform (CF) in solution equal to ~95% was observed in all monitoring piezometers in the treatment area. Simultaneously, a temporary increase in dichloromethane and chloromethane was detected and monitored. Subsequently, these values were rapidly degraded below detection limits in all piezometers except in several downstream points. No new increases in CT and CF concentrations were observed, demonstrating a successful dechlorination process. Hexavalent chromium was completely reduced at all monitoring sites in the treatment area. See poster from previous conference: https://www.uee.uliege.be/upload/docs/application/pdf/2019-10/114_pxc168_gq2019_conference_poster_fnl.pdf

CLIMATE ADAPTATION PROFILE: CONTINENTAL STEEL CORP.
EPA website, August 2022

EPA recently released a climate adaptation profile describing measures taken at the 183-acre Continental Steel Corp. Superfund site in Kokomo, Indiana. Remedial actions currently focus on extracting contaminated groundwater to be treated by the municipal wastewater treatment plant. The site is vulnerable to flooding and associated soil and sediment erosion; approximately half of the site is located within a 100-year floodplain associated with either of two on-site creeks. Measures to assure the remedy's resilience to flooding involved weatherproofing the buildings and equipment used for groundwater extraction, using nature-based techniques to minimize stormwater runoff and associated erosion, and converting the site's former quarry pond to a four-acre stormwater basin capable of storing 58,000 yd3 of stormwater. On-site measures also were taken to contribute to climate change mitigation. Operating three grid-tied wind turbines in the former quarry area offset up to 60% of the grid electricity required for groundwater extraction. A 20-year power purchase agreement enables the operation of a 7.2-megawatt solar energy farm above the site's constructed soil cap. https://www.epa.gov/superfund/climate-adaptation-profile-continental-steel-corp

IN-SITU CHEMICAL INJECTION TO TREAT CHLORINATED SOLVENTS IN GROUNDWATER
Matsueda, T. ǀ Remediation Technologies Symposium East, 1-3 June, Niagara Falls, Ontario, 48 slides, 2022

PCE and degradation products were identified in soil, groundwater, and soil vapor at a former dry cleaner site. Concentrations were above the British Columbia Contaminated Sites Regulation standards on-site and off-site beneath roads, residences, and a school. Excavation removed ~6,000 m3 of PCE-impacted soil in the source area and off-site. However, post-remedial investigations identified remaining contaminated soil, groundwater, and soil vapor. The objectives were to replace the groundwater treatment system, reduce PCE concentrations, complete a human health and ecological risk assessment, and revitalize the site. An in-situ chemical injection program of BOS 100® was implemented to treat PCE in groundwater. Based on the success of a pilot study conducted on-site in a groundwater hot spot, a large-scale injection program was implemented. Each injection point was pre-drilled using a sonic rig and then backfilled with a grout mixture due to the presence of dense silt till and heaving sand. Injections were completed using Geoprobe® technology through the pre-drilled boreholes and injecting BOS 100® mixed with water at set vertical intervals throughout the subsurface. After the injection program, the groundwater treatment system was shut down, and groundwater wells were sampled. PCE concentrations decreased in most wells within the injection area but increased in select wells, which may be attributed to shutting down the groundwater treatment system. The plan is to continue groundwater sampling quarterly until the plume is stable or shrinking, then complete a risk assessment and apply for risk-based closure. https://esaa.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/RTE22Matsueda.pdf

GOWANUS CANAL SUPERFUND SITE. IV: DELINEATION OF POTENTIALLY MIGRATING NAPL LAYERS FOR ISS TREATMENT
Gee, G.L., D.G. Grubb, J.L. Gentry, C.D. Tsiamis, and J. Hess.
Journal of Hazardous, Toxic, and Radioactive Waste 26(3)(2022)

This paper presents the decision-making strategy applied to select areas to implement ISS to a depth of 5 ft into the native sediments at the Gowanus Canal Superfund site after dredging the overlying soft sediments in remedial target areas (RTAs)-1 and -2. Historic operation of three manufactured gas plants resulted in NAPL impacts. ISS target areas were developed primarily from in-canal Tar-specific Green Optical Screening Tool (TarGOST) analysis of sediments at a 2-in. (5 cm) layer resolution and an empirical correlation relating the TarGOST percent reference emitter response to the NAPL pore fluid saturation (PFS) in the cores, and the measured NAPL PFS threshold above which NAPL was potentially mobile. A volume accommodation model (VAM) evaluated the ability of various individual NAPL PFS exceedances and their associated layer thicknesses in the sediment to trigger a PFS exceedance above the threshold value of the entire overlying horizon, resulting in NAPL breakthrough from as deep as 10 ft into the native sediment. The output from the VAM was integrated with ArcGIS spatial mapping and visualization tools to generate Thiessen polygons that indicated the areas having overall NAPL exceedances. Mobile NAPL areas were identified and effectively targeted for ISS, totaling 82,798 and 227,297 ft2 (7,692 and 21,117 m2) in RTA-1 and -2, respectively, or 15,227 and 49,843 yd3 (11,642 and 38,128 m3) based on the ISS mass thickness.


Demonstrations / Feasibility Studies
ELECTROCOAGULATION FOR ARSENIC REMOVAL: FIELD TRIALS IN RURAL WEST BENGAL
Dutta, N., A. Haldar, and A. Gupta.
Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 80:248-258(2021)

Electrocoagulation with iron electrodes was assessed as an effective, affordable, and low-maintenance treatment technology to remove arsenic from groundwater to < 0.01 mg/L (WHO limit). Electrochemically generated iron is converted to hydrated ferric oxide within the contaminated water, which takes up the arsenic from the water. A downstream filtration unit (sand or activated alumina) was applied to remove ferric hydroxide flocs produced during the process. Lab experiments were conducted in a batch reactor using iron plates as electrodes with monopolar configuration to study the effects of initial pH and electro-charge loading (ECL) on arsenic removal. The optimum operating condition was an ECL of 25-30 Coulombs/L at pH 7.0 and an initial arsenic concentration of 0.2 mg/L. After designing the electrocoagulation system, two field trials were implemented in West Bengal. Arsenic removal was significant (75-80%), delivering safe water with arsenic below 0.01 mg/L. Passivation of the electrodes occurred during the operation, and calcium-based (including iron) deposition was observed on the cathodes. Passivation is avoidable after running regular polarity reversal of the electrodes.


A CONTROLLABLE REDUCTION-OXIDATION COUPLING PROCESS FOR CHLORONITROBENZENES REMEDIATION: FROM LAB TO FIELD TRIAL
Wei, K., Y. Wan, M. Liao, S. Cao, H. Zhang, X. Peng, H. Gu, C. Ling, M. Li, Y. Shi, Z. Ai, J. Gong, and L. Zhang. ǀ Water Research 218:118453(2022)

A controllable reduction-oxidation coupling (ROC) process composed of zero-valent iron (ZVI) and H2O2 was designed to effectively remove chloronitrobenzenes (CNBs) from water and soil. In water, ZVI first reduced p-CNB into 4-chloronitrosobenzene and 4-chloroaniline intermediates. Intermediates were then reduced from the subsequent oxidative ring-opening by ·OH generated from the reaction between Fe(II) and H2O2. By controlling the addition time of H2O2, the final mineralization rate of p-CNB reached 6.6×10-1/h, ~74 times that of oxidation alone (9.0×10-3/h). This controllable ROC process was also applicable to remediate CNB-contaminated soil by either ex situ treatment or in situ injection, decreasing the concentrations of p-CNB (1,105 to 3 mg/kg), m-CNB (980 to 1 mg/kg), and o-CNB (94 to <1 mg/kg), and meeting the remediation goals (p-CNB: < 32.35 mg/kg, o-CNB and m-CNB: < 1.98 mg/kg). Lab and field trial results reveal that the ROC strategy may be promising for treating electron-withdrawing groups substituted aromatic contaminants.


A SIMULATION STUDY OF IN-SITU NAPL REMEDIATION TREATMENT BY USING SURFACTANT AND FOAM PROCESSES IN A MILITARY BASE SOUTH KOREA
Cepeda-Salgado, B., H. Fleifel, G.S. Lee, and S.I. Kam.
Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 247:103982(2022)

A study investigated the potential of using surfactant and foam processes to remediate NAPL in situ at a military base in South Korea. The subsurface permeability and net-to-gross values were optimized based on history matching and a machine-learning algorithm. Simulations were performed to predict the surfactant/foam processes applied in the field, then expanded to evaluate different scenarios. A 5 m × 5 m treatment area with a 3 m depth was prepared. The NAPL was a mixture of various oil compounds with an average oil saturation of 5%. Using three injection and three extraction wells, the overall remediation process applied consisted of a 20-day injection of surfactant solution (Tween 80) to mobilize the oleic phase trapped by capillary force and a 3-day injection of foam (i.e., gas and surfactant co-injection) to control the mobility of injected gas and overcome the heterogeneity of the underground system. Results indicate that (i) surfactant/foam processes effectively recovered NAPL from the shallow subsurface, recovering >90% of contaminants, and (ii) computer simulations can be a useful tool for evaluating the in situ treatment and improving the design of similar operations. See the introduction at https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0169772222000304.



Research
PFAS RESULTS FROM SAMPLING AT BIOSOLIDS SITES
Burns, J. ǀ Northeast Conference on The Science of PFAS: Public Health & The Environment, 5-6 April, Marlborough, MA, 21 slides, 2022

Landfill leachate; wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) influent, effluent, and sludge; WWTF septage, and surface water at facilities were sampled to assess the presence and concentrations of PFAS within landfill leachate and at WWTFs that process that leachate. Results indicated that PFAS were detected in all landfill leachate, WWTF influent, effluent, and sludges/biosolids sampled. Follow-on work was conducted to assess the contribution of landfill leachate to influent and effluent concentrations of PFAS at WWTFs and the potential for PFAS contributions to the environment from WWTFs. A total of 124 influent, 136 effluent, 75 sludge, and five septage samples were collected from three closed landfills, one active landfill, and 30 WWTF facilities. Three sampling events were conducted to collect surface water samples upstream and downstream of the Montpelier WWTF discharge. The samples were analyzed by Alpha Analytical using their proprietary modified EPA 537.1 method, which incorporates isotope dilution to quantify regulated PFAS associated with drinking water quality in Vermont: PFHxS, PFHpA, PFOA, PFOS, and PFNA. Reduced PFAS concentrations between WWTF influent and effluent samples imply that sorption to sludges may be occurring. Sludges analyzed as "solids" showed no significant difference in the average five regulated PFAS concentrations at leachate-accepting facilities compared to facilities that do not accept leachate. The data collected indicated that PFAS was present in all landfill leachate and WWTF influent, effluent, and sludge tested. Relative WWTF influent and effluent PFAS concentrations were greater at facilities handling landfill leachates. The type of PFAS observed included the five regulated PFAS and several unregulated PFAS reported as replacement compounds for PFOA and PFOS. In many cases, non-regulated PFAS concentrations exceeded the five regulated PFAS concentrations.
Slides: https://whova.com/xems/whova_backend/get_event_s3_file_api/?event_id=sopc_202003&file_url=https://d1keuthy5s86c8.cloudfront.net/static/ems/upload/files/zaskk_Burns.VTDEC.Residuals.NEWMOA.2022.pdf&eventkey=ad5b9325b33ddf90075c415919b946b4db 08203e34443e6dc4f9c9107ff2d5bf
Report: https://dec.vermont.gov/sites/dec/files/wmp/SolidWaste/Documents/02.03.20_PFAS%20in%20LF%20and%20WWTF%20Final%20Report.pdf
For all site documents, see https://dec.vermont.gov/pfas


IMPORTANCE OF HYDRAULIC RESIDENCE TIME FOR METHYLMERCURY ACCUMULATION IN SEDIMENT AND FISH FROM ARTIFICIAL RESERVOIRS
Jung, E., H. Kim, D. Yun, M.M. Rahman, J.-H. Lee, S. Kim, C.-K. Kim, and S. Han.
Chemosphere 293:133545(2022)

A study used 2016-2020 monitoring data of five artificial reservoirs to identify the main sources of methylmercury (MeHg) in the water column and the critical factors related to MeHg concentration and methylation rate constant (km) in sediment, and total Hg concentrations in fish. Sediment transport dominated over runoff in the long residence time reservoirs (400-475 days), while runoff dominated over sediment transport in the short residence time reservoirs (10 days). Whereas the sediment km showed a comparable variation with the algal biomass, the sediment MeHg concentration and the length-normalized Hg concentration in barbel steed and bluegill increased in the longer residence time reservoirs with lower algal biomass. As MeHg accumulation in sediment and fish tends to increase in the slowly overturning reservoirs, the hydraulic residence time should be carefully managed to meet the best protection of human health from chronic Hg exposure by fish consumption.


OPTIMIZATION AND ANALYSIS OF A SLOW-RELEASE PERMANGANATE GEL FOR TCE PLUME TREATMENT IN GROUNDWATER
Ogundare, O.O. Master's thesis, the College of Arts and Sciences of Ohio University, 101 pp, 2021

Research examined diffusion characteristics, such as lateral dispersion and MnO4- release, of a gel formed by injecting SRP-G solutions into saturated sandy media to treat TCE contamination by oxidation over time. The study determined whether (i) SRP-G solution can create a robust gel in saturated sandy media with groundwater flow consisting of an ideal mixture of colloidal silica and a maximum quantity of KMnO4, (ii) gel formed in saturated sandy media would delay MnO4- release due to decrease permeability, and (iii) whether MnO4 - released from the SRP-G gel would spread through the saturated sandy media with the flow and slowly release MnO4- to potentially treat dissolved TCE plumes. In column tests, KMnO4 concentrations >28 g/L were used for the SRP-G process. A 40 g/L KMnO4 concentration mixed with 20 mL and 10 mL each of 40 wt% and 50 wt% colloidal silica, respectively, had the longest MnO4- release duration up to 6.1 days, suggesting gelation may have occurred in the column. The small flow tank result showed the lateral dispersion and MnO4- release duration up to 15 days after injection of 40 g/L SRP-G solution mixed with 100 mL and 50 mL each of 40 wt% and 50 wt% colloidal silica, respectively. The large flow tank results showed that 40 g/L KMnO4 solution with 200 mL and 100 mL each of 40 wt% and 50 wt% colloidal silica, respectively, injected into saturated sandy media laterally spread through the sandy media. The extent of spreading varied in three layers with a MnO4- release duration up to 30 days in the top, middle and bottom layers. Permanganate release duration results suggested the formation of gels from which MnO4- is slowly released and dispersed migrate to treat dissolved TCE plumes. https://etd.ohiolink.edu/apexprod/rws_etd/send_file/send?accession=ohiou161797021188483&disposition=inline


BENCH-SCALE ELECTROCHEMICAL TREATMENT OF CO-CONTAMINATED CLAYEY SOIL
Pelletier, A., A. Hohner, I.D. Akin, I. Chowdhury, R. Watts, X. Shi, B. Dutmer, and J. Mueller.
Illinois Center for Transportation Project R27-183-HS, 119 pp, 2021

An accelerated in situ electrochemical treatment that augments electrokinetics with H2O2 and is adaptable to use at construction sites was developed to remove high molecular weight (HMW) PAHs and metals from clayey soil cost-effectively. Bench-scale reactors resembling field-scale in situ electrokinetic systems were designed and fabricated to assess treatment. Model contaminants pyrene, chromium, and manganese were spiked into the model clay, kaolinite. Electrokinetics were imposed using a low-intensity electrical field distributed by graphite rods. Electrolytic H2O2 systems distributed electrical current and facilitated contaminant removal. Average contaminant removals of 100%, 42.3%, and 4.5% were achieved for pyrene, manganese, and chromium, respectively. The bench-scale treatment approach can guide future field-scale implementation. Results signify that electrochemical systems that leverage eco-friendly oxidant addition may replace excavation and disposal to address clayey soils co-contaminated with HMW-PAHs and metals. https://apps.ict.illinois.edu/projects/getfile.asp?id=9699


SURFACE-ACTIVE BEHAVIOR OF SELECT PER- AND POLYFLUOROALKYL SUBSTANCES (PFAS) AND THEIR MIXTURES
Chen, J., A. Adegbule, J. Huang, and M. Brooks.
ORISE Meets the World Monthly webinar, 2 December, 15 slides, 2021

Surface tension of seven PFAS compounds with different carbon chain lengths (n = 4, 6, and 8) and functional groups (COO- and SO3-) was measured as a function of concentration for individual compounds and their mixtures. Six PFAS showed a sharp decline in surface tension with increasing concentration with no evidence of micelle formation. The PFAS compounds showed different surface activities which may relate to carbon chain length and functional groups. All mixtures showed surface tension measurements intermediate to individual compounds. https://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_file_download.cfm?p_download_id=544340&Lab=CESER


ENHANCED ELECTROKINETICALLY-DELIVERED PERSULFATE AND ALTERNATING ELECTRIC FIELD INDUCED THERMAL EFFECT ACTIVATED PERSULFATE IN SITU FOR REMEDIATION OF PHENANTHRENE CONTAMINATED CLAY
Wen, D., X. Guo, Q. Li, and R. Fu. ǀ Journal of Hazardous Materials 423(Part B):127199(2022)

A strategy is proposed to deliver persulfate (PS) into clay electrokinetically. PS was used to flush a cathode to continuously inhibit water electrolysis. A novel approach of heating soil by alternating current (AC) was applied to thermally activate PS in situ. The mass transfer efficiency of PS by electroosmotic flow is about 20 times that by electromigration. When PS was added to the anode chamber, the PS solution continuously flushed the cathode creating relatively balanced influent and effluent flow rates, and significantly improving the mass transfer efficiency of PS. Compared to using NaNO3 solution flushing, an increase of 51.7% was achieved, reaching an average phenanthrene degradation rate of 78.8% in the soil cell. The highest overall PHE removal rate was 87.8%, using a cycle strategy of enhanced electrokinetically-delivered PS followed by AC heating. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis showed oxidative radicals (SO4·-/·OH) were the major species responsible for enhanced PHE degradation. Results demonstrate that this cycle strategy is a viable method for remediation of PAHs in clay.



General News
PROPOSED DESIGNATION OF PERFLUOROOCTANOIC ACID (PFOA) AND PERFLUOROOCTANESULFONIC ACID (PFOS) AS CERCLA HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES
EPA Website, Updated September 1, 2022

EPA is proposing to designate two per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) -- PFOA and PFOS, including their salts and structural isomers -- as hazardous substances under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), also known as Superfund. This proposed rulemaking would increase transparency around releases of these harmful chemicals and help to hold polluters accountable for cleaning up their contamination. The rulemaking would require entities to immediately report releases of PFOA and PFOS that meet or exceed the reportable quantity to the National Response Center, state or Tribal emergency response commission, and the local or Tribal emergency planning committee (local emergency responders). https://www.epa.gov/superfund/proposed-designation-perfluorooctanoic-acid-pfoa-and-perfluorooctanesulfonic-acid-pfos


USING A FISH-BASED METRIC TO TRACK REMEDIATION AND RESTORATION EFFECTIVENESS IN PICKLE PONDS AND PONDS BEHIND ERIE PIER
Gordon, M., G. Ankley, A. Balz, G. Beaubien, J. Hoffman, D. Krabbenhoft, S. Janssen, Jim Lazorchak, T. Luxton, M. Mills, T. Newcomer-Johnson, M. Pearson, G. Peterson, D. White, and R. Yeardley. ǀ St. Louis River Summit, virtual, 7-9 March, poster, 2022

This presentation covers fish-based metrics to assess remedy and restoration effectiveness, study designs implemented, and analytical tools that can be leveraged at contaminated sites. Historical sediment contamination from mercury, dioxins, PCBs, and PAHs has resulted in several beneficial use impairments (BUIs), including increased incidence of fish consumption advisory, fish tumors and other abnormalities (removed in 2019), and loss of fish and wildlife habitat in the St. Louis River estuary. The estuary is currently the second largest area of concern (AOC) in the U.S. Remedy and restoration effectiveness research initiatives are developing useful metrics to measure the progress and success of AOC projects. Examples include the Ponds behind Erie Pier (PBEP) and Pickle Ponds, which are small embayments with historical contamination receiving mostly stormwater through hydrological connections on the Minnesota and Wisconsin sides of the estuary, respectively. PBEP is a priority remediation site due to a wide array of contaminants of concern, including organic and metal contaminants. Pickle Pond is a remediation and restoration site that is both contaminated and ecologically degraded. Measuring remedy and restoration effectiveness requires documenting baseline and reference conditions before the start of a project, including contaminant bioaccumulation, industrial mercury contribution indices of biotic integrity based on fish, and other indicators. Once PBEP and Pickle Pond undergo cleanup and environmental monitoring indicates environmental status improvements, BUIs can be removed, and delisting of the St. Louis River estuary as an AOC can begin. https://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_file_download.cfm?p_download_id=544429&Lab=CCTE


UNDERSTANDING PAHS —TABULATION ISN'T INTERPRETATION. A PUBLICLY AVAILABLE TOOL TO DETERMINE THE SOURCE OF PAHS AT YOUR SITE
Fuellbrandt, P. and C.D. Sandau. ǀ REMTECH 2021: The Remediation Technologies Symposium, Banff, AB, Canada, 13-15 October, 13 slides, 2021

A method to determine whether PAHs measured in environmental samples are petrogenic (e.g., the release of a hydrocarbon product) or pyrogenic (e.g., wind-blown ash, burned organic material, creosote) based on widely accepted forensic practices is demonstrated in this presentation. The process of selecting lab analysis, preparing data for interpretation, visualizing data, and determining PAH sources is also discussed.
Slides: https://esaa.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/RT21-Sandau.pdf
Longer abstract: https://esaa.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/RT2021-program-Abstracts-75.pdf


THE ACCELERATING IMPORTANCE OF DATA SCIENCE IN REMEDIATION
Horst, J., S. Burnell, R.J. Stuetzle, L.M. Austrins, and D. Schanze.
Groundwater Monitoring & Remediation 42(3):23-29(2022)

The focus of this article is on how data science can continuously improve remediation portfolio management. One example examines optimizing sampling programs by evaluating regional variability of analytical requirements, the number of duplicates/trip blanks, productivity, scoping standards, and variability. Another example evaluates the effectiveness of various remedy types across large portfolios. See a snip of the article at https://ngwa.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gwmr.12539.


THE CALIFORNIA GEOTRACKER DATABASE: A UNIQUE PUBLIC RESOURCE FOR UNDERSTANDING CONTAMINATED SITES
Beckley, L., S. McMasters, M. Cohen, D. Cordano, S. Rauch, and T. McHugh.
Groundwater Monitoring & Remediation 42(3):105-115(2022)

The California GeoTracker website and database serve as a public repository for a wide variety of information related to the investigation and remediation of cleanup sites in California. Responsible parties must electronically submit lab analytical results for environmental samples along with reports and other information required under California regulations. The GeoTracker website also supports public access to the entire database of lab analytical results, dating back to 2001, and includes ~285,000,000 analytical records for >50,000 contaminated and formerly contaminated sites. Because of the large volume of publicly-available data, GeoTracker has been used as the primary data source for several data mining studies in the last 10 years. This article describes how GeoTracker has evolved to account for changes in regulatory priorities, such as understanding vapor intrusion mechanisms and distribution of PFAS in the environment while maintaining database continuity.



The Technology Innovation News Survey welcomes your comments and suggestions, as well as information about errors for correction. Please contact Michael Adam of the U.S. EPA Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation at adam.michael@epa.gov or (703) 603-9915 with any comments, suggestions, or corrections.

Mention of non-EPA documents, presentations, or papers does not constitute a U.S. EPA endorsement of their contents, only an acknowledgment that they exist and may be relevant to the Technology Innovation News Survey audience.